lind-peinture
» » Techniques of the Selling Writer

eBook Techniques of the Selling Writer ePub

by Dwight V. Swain

eBook Techniques of the Selling Writer ePub
Author: Dwight V. Swain
Language: English
ISBN: 0806111917
ISBN13: 978-0806111919
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; unknown edition (January 15, 1981)
Pages: 344
Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory: Reference
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 943
Formats: azw doc lit rtf
ePub file: 1113 kb
Fb2 file: 1733 kb

Dwight Vreeland Swain's first published story was "Henry Horn's Super Solvent", which appeared in Fantastic Adventures in 1941.

Dwight Vreeland Swain's first published story was "Henry Horn's Super Solvent", which appeared in Fantastic Adventures in 1941. He contributed stories in the science fiction, mystery, Western, and action adventure genres to a variety of pulp magazines.

Dwight V. Swain spent a lifetime writing newspaper and magazine articles, pulp fiction, and screenplays

Dwight V. Swain spent a lifetime writing newspaper and magazine articles, pulp fiction, and screenplays. For more than twenty years he taught in the Professional Writing Program at the University of Oklahoma. His popular books, Techniques of the Selling Writer and Creating Characters: How to Build Story People are published by the University of Oklahoma Press.

Techniques of the Selling Writer. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Techniques of the Selling Writerprovides solid instruction for people who want to write and sell fiction, not just to talk and study about it. It gives the background, insights, and specific procedures needed by all beginning writers. Here one can learn how to group words into copy that moves, movement into scenes, and scenes into stories; how to develop characters, how to revise and polish, and finally, how to sell the product. No one can teach talent, but the practical skills of the professional writer's craft can certainly be taught

Techniques of the Selling Writer By Dwight V. Swain Topic Category, Writing, Creativity Terms: Motivation Reaction Unit Reading Sections Foreword 1. .They are, in brief, tricks and techniques of the selling writer. They're all this book has to offer

Techniques of the Selling Writer By Dwight V. Fiction and You 2. The Words You Write 3. Plain Facts About Feelings 4. Conflict And How To Build It 5. Fiction Strategy 6. Beginning, Middle, End 7. The People In Your Story 8. Preparation, Planning, Production 9. Selling Your Stories 1. They're all this book has to offer. 1. Fiction and You A story is experience translated into literary process.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads.

Dwight Swain was one of the great fiction writing teachers and Techniques of the Selling Writer is his best work. A friend of mine tipped me off to this book back in about 1990. I read the book and applied it to my writing. Then I read it again and applied it to my writing. If you have the talent, this book can make you a novelist. There is a lot of meat in here. Over the course of a year or so, I learned how to write. If there is any reason I’m published today, it’s because of what I learned in this book. The book was written in the 1960s by a renowned teacher of creative writing, Dwight Swain.

confession writer now moving into the hardback novel field, and Jeanne Williams, author of prize-winning books for young people, are among those with whom Ive had the pleasure of working personally, at one time or another. What do I find when I look back along the road that these writers and hundreds of others like them have followed, as they went through courses with me and various of my colleagues: Foster-Harris, Helen Reagan Smith (in the Universitys Extension Division), and the late Walter S. Campbell?

The selling parts of the book are things I've gotten elsewhere, but learning what makes good sentences, good scenes, balanced . When it comes to the art of writing, put Dwight Swain in the coveted class of Strunk and White

The selling parts of the book are things I've gotten elsewhere, but learning what makes good sentences, good scenes, balanced chapters-it's worth a fortune. This book and Gary Provost's MAKING YOUR WORDS WORK are the two best tools for writers I've found. And I'm saying this as my 1th book is about to come out, and my 500th shorter piece. When it comes to the art of writing, put Dwight Swain in the coveted class of Strunk and White. What that respected duo does for writing style, Swain does for writing technique. With nary a wasted word, he rips away all the mystery, all the obfuscation from everything from character to conflict to complication, plus a lot more.

University of oklahoma press norman. Norman, Oklahoma 73069. Assigned 1973 to the University of Oklahoma Press,Norman, Publishing Division of the University. Manufactured in the . ISBN 978-0-8061-1191-9 (paperback : alk. paper). ISBN 978-0-8061-8657-3 (ebook : mobipocket).

Techniques of the Selling Writer provides solid instruction for people who want to write and sell fiction, not just to talk and study about it. It gives the background, insights, and specific procedures needed by all beginning writers. Here one can learn how to group words into copy that moves, movement into scenes, and scenes into stories; how to develop characters, how to revise and polish, and finally, how to sell the product.

No one can teach talent, but the practical skills of the professional writer's craft can certainly be taught. The correct and imaginative use of these kills can shorten any beginner's apprenticeship by years.

This is the book for writers who want to turn rejection slips into cashable checks.

Zolorn
It isn't that this book will teach you how to write. I don't suppose any book can really ever do that. However, like others yet social in its own way, it will boil down the technical bits into a framework that you can build your unique style from.

Ultimately every writer finds their own way to write. You can plug away mercilessly at that, or do something a bit more productive, and have someone to set you upon on e of the paths. Professor Swain does this rather nicely, and with the delicate touch needed for new writers.

The book does show its age in some of the language, especially with regard to politically correct approaches to race and gender. However, I don't think it does so to its detriment. At least it does it no more than a reading of Shakespeare.

If you are looking to get started and have no idea, this book is for you. If you've been trying to get words to the page, but spend most your time staring at blankness, this book is for you. If you want to, as Mr. King says in a similar genre of book, "fill your toolbox" which is currently empty, this book is for you. Come to think of it, this book is really for everyone. The world could stand a few more good, maybe even great, writers. Good luck.
Gagas
In On Writing, Stephen King said that most books on writing are BS. He said the only book on writing you need is Elements of Style. Then he tells you to read a lot and write a lot. With all due respect to Stephen King, but he's wrong.

Here's why. Writing and storytelling are separate skills. It took me years to figure this out, and I want to spare you the pain. They are separate skills. This is why so many English majors can't write a novel, and creative writing courses don't necessarily produce good writers. They teach writing. Not storytelling. What you ought to do is learn screenwriting, get a MFA, or read this book. Now, to be clear, I already did a lot of research online on the craft of storytelling. The "craft" agents and publishers keep talking about is the craft of storytelling. NOT writing. Do you honestly think people read Dan Brown for the writing? Get real.

This book came out in 1974. It uses outdated examples. For example. it assumes women are homemakers and writers tend to be men, and stuff like that. There are a lot of jokes that'd be considered racist today. And a few times he throws around rape as if it's an expected plot point in action-packed stories. But overall the examples are more humorous than seriously offensive, if you're easily offended.

Anyway, here's the bottom line on how I know it works. Everything in this book--and keep in mind it's from 1974 without any revisions--describes what's good about stories such as the Hunger Games, Twilight, John Grisham, and any other bestseller you can think of. It gives you very concrete lessons on how to tell a good story, as well as WHY certain techniques work.

My only regret is not reading this years ago.

Obviously you must read and write a lot. No shortcut exists there. But to say that you will learn everything you need to know by reading and writing is like saying you will become an expert marksman by shooting and watching other people shoot. Or you will become an excellent painter by painting and watching other people paint. No. You must know the techniques. And these techniques are universal and timeless. If you've read a lot and pay attention to what you are reading, nothing Swain says will seem new or strange to you. For me, about 60% of what he describes I already understood on an intuitive level, just because I pay attention when I watch movies or read books, on why something engages me or turns me off. But when I went through this book it was like having an epiphany. All of a sudden I understood WHY a story is good. Now I have terms to describe my "gut feelings" and intuitions. Swain breaks it down like a science.
Damdyagab
This is probably the single most useful book on writing I've read so far. The skills discussed seem to hold up well and be consistent with what I find in books I enjoy. I'm fond of the way the author reinforces the recurring theme that not all paths are for all people. I would say the single greatest value in this book is how clearly illustrated a knowledge of psychology and sociology can be in character and story development. Everything from high school woes to epic fantasy adventures revolve around the same core elements; understanding how people feel, react, and act in response to external environmental stimuli, other people, and their own thoughts and feelings. As Simon Sinek would put it, "Find Your Why." Not just for every character, but every element. Find a book at the library on human behavior, or go out in the world and observe human behavior, or go out in the world and *experience* human behavior. These are things that will influence your imagination, creativity, and authenticity. What this book does is show you how to structure and organize that information in a simple, practical way, without failing to remind you that it's only a starting point.

The book has it's flaws, perceived or real (not 5 stars, after all). Maybe I was reading too much between the lines, but a few things had me question the character of this author. Apparently, whether a "lone Negro teacher" who's "fresh out of college" can prove she's as competent as the other teachers in a white high school use to be a good story question, but whether "Negroes are as good as whites" is "a question that can't be resolved in fiction." Everything about that rubs me the wrong way. I don't like the way it's worded, and I loathe that our not so distant history could make it possible for anyone to consider that a "debate on anthropological or sociological theory".

I also raise an eyebrow when I read that the "main function" of a heroine is to be "the hero's reward", and that her "prime characteristic is desirability". Women are often indicated as an objective, a prize, or a catalyst to the hero, but rarely *as* the hero. Again, maybe it's out of context or I'm drawing correlations that aren't there, but I'm annoyed by comments like one suggesting... declaring actually, that many men's pent-up aggression and hate is mostly the result of frustrations created by the females in their lives. Are these innocent examples of story elements out of context, or sharp indicators of the total lack of respect and value this author from a different era had in regards to women? These little comments are few and far between, tiny insignificant nuggets contradicting what I would otherwise describe as valuable insight into the human condition.

Other complaints? A coupe chapters have a fair amount of content that feels redundant, possibly attempting to reinforce earlier lessons in new way, but usually in the exact same way. I felt it the most reading Chapter 7, but it wasn't exclusive to that chapter. Also, since it's an older book, countless references (especially to authors and books) were completely irrelevant to me as useful examples.

Overall, the book is long and boring like most other instructional books, but it contains more practical foundation skills on writing in one place than any other book or online article I've read. Though generally not very exciting, I was entertained by the author pointing out, at least as I'd describe it, the flawed arrogance and ego of the editor. Without imagining the practical applications of an internet or the shifting landscape of book publishing, it was nice to know there was still a focus on self and finding your own way back in the day, in spite of some stranger telling you your writing wasn't worth paper. I sort of like that nothing in that regard has changed in 50 years. If an editor thinks they know better than you, and can do something you can't, than an editor can obviously be dead wrong. Again, greatly fond of the recurring theme that your story is *your* story. If you like it, you're probably not the only one that likes it. And they'll like it *for* the story, not for your technically masterful writing technique.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only