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eBook One Memory at a Time: Inspiration Advice for Writing Your Family Story ePub

by D.G. Fulford

eBook One Memory at a Time: Inspiration  Advice for Writing Your Family Story ePub
Author: D.G. Fulford
Language: English
ISBN: 0385498705
ISBN13: 978-0385498708
Publisher: Doubleday; 1 edition (October 17, 2000)
Pages: 160
Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory: Reference
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 924
Formats: rtf mobi lrf doc
ePub file: 1971 kb
Fb2 file: 1517 kb

Debbie Fulford gives you stories from her family storehouse, encouragement, perspective, and tips

Debbie Fulford gives you stories from her family storehouse, encouragement, perspective, and tips. I like the boxed summaries at the end of the chapters. One Memory At a Time" delivers two important gifts: -the sense that writing family stories is important, and -permission to let it all be whatever it is. "Your stories will go this way and that way, too, twisting and turning. Permit yourself to ramble. A family history is a magnet. One thought attracts anohter. In this way, your story gets told.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

One Memory at a Time book. A wonderful companion to the bestselling To Our Children's Children, One Memory at a Time offers advice and encouragement on writing family and personal histories.

A wonderful companion to the bestselling "To Our Children's Children, One Memory at a Time" offers advice and encouragement on writing family and personal histories. If To Our Children's Children is like Family History Writing 101, then this book, by the coauthor of that bestseller is the graduate seminar.

One memory at a Time. Select Format: Hardcover.

A wonderful companion to the best-selling To Our Children's Children, One Memory at a Time offers indispensable guidance and encouragement on writing family an. .One memory at a Time.

Are you sure you want to remove One memory at a time from your list?

One memory at a time. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Genealogy Reading from Julia Soliday.

One Memory at a Time: Inspiration and Advice for Writing Your Family Story by . When you give your stories, you are giving yourself, says Fulford. In this succinct guide-also perfect for gift-giving-you’ll find plenty of warm inspiration and solid ideas for getting your family history stories on paper. 8. Windows on the Past: Identifying, Dating, and Preserving Photographs by Diane VanSkiver Gagel (Heritage Books).

The first time Koch did this, he reread what he had written and allegedly thought This is so good – I’m never . Bill Clegg’s inspiration for his novel Did You Ever Have a Family came while he was writing his memoir and started taking a harder look at his hometown.

The first time Koch did this, he reread what he had written and allegedly thought This is so good – I’m never able to write this well! He got his idea for The Dinner, his breakthrough novel, after having had a few beers on Christmas eve. He says, I just really started looking at this place where I grew up with different eyes and I became interested in it, and during that time I felt this compulsion to write down stuff that would come to me about the place.

Tell your family history one ancestor at a time with the Classic Ancestor Snapshot for Google Docs

Tell your family history one ancestor at a time with the Classic Ancestor Snapshot for Google Docs. Find this Pin and more on Family by Sue Bergeron. Overflowing with questions on a variety of subjects to get you started writing: your family and ancestry, house where you grew up, od, sc. The easiest way to organize that pile of family history photos and documents is into scrapbook binders. To Our Children's Children: Preserving Family Histories For Generations To Come.

A wonderful companion to the best-selling To Our Children's Children, One Memory at a Time offers indispensable guidance and encouragement on writing family and personal histories.Family history isn't hard. We do it every day without thinking about it. Our minds travel in that direction. Our minds are always going home. Family stories are our points of reference in every situation. They are involuntary responses, like sneezes. We see a hat worn by a man on an old movie channel and our minds jump to grandfather; his hat, his chair, his Scottie on his lap. We roll our cart by the butcher case at the grocery store and a passing glimpse at cubes of stew beef transports us momentarily to mother's kitchen, where she reaches for her blue-speckled roasting pan, the one with the lid.When you give your stories, you are giving yourself. You are giving your parents, your grandparents, your great-grandparents to future generations. You are allowing the past and the present to shake hands with one another.Your family history is not meant to be painted in broad brush strokes, summing up the meaning of the millennium. It is a description of your living room, of your grandmother's living room-your life.
MOQ
Sure that it is a useful tutorial...bought it for Bob Greene's foreward; he is a true American writer that is underappreciated.
JOIN
This is really helpful as I teach a class on writing family stories at a regional Family Search Library. The short quotes are memorable and the concept of one memory at a time is great for our students.
Altad
Good advice
Kegal
This tiny little book is complete tripe. After reading it all the way through in 30 minutes, it is apparent that this was nothing more than an attempt to capitalize on the more popular title by Bob Greene. She interjects an ad for his book with each chapter. This book is so off target it glaringly exposes the author's complete lack of understanding of the subject of family history - or worse, a deliberate attempt to re-define this concept to promote the sales of her brother's book - as if that is ALL you need to write your family history - which is a concept reiterated throughout. If she stuck with the title on the cover about your personal story, or even narrative, memoir, etc., it would have been an OK read. But giving people a false impression of family history gives rise to false "histories." While I totally agree that our ancestors' and family members' stories/memories/narratives are priceless pieces of our family history - they are not all that is needed - and sadly, by ignoring research and documentation, folks would be missing the wonderful, enriching, details or additional stories that are hiding in the records!

In her words: "Family history isn't hard." "Family history can be as easy as writing a letter." "You are creating genealogy no one will have to search for." "Family history involves storytelling rather than the specificities of years." "Family history is enhanced by research, but it does not require it." "Preserving family history is a free-form art..." "We are using memory as reference and resource." "You are creating genealogy that no one will have to search for."

She also manages to give you all the genealogy and oral history advice you'll ever need through 3.5 pages of how to research online, visit a library, and interview someone - oversimplifying with really bad advice (including interviewing lots of community members without a mention of consent forms etc.) - and insulting two entire fields of work.
Ironically, she covers journalism and writing for a newspaper with a long chapter - since this is really her background. She also covers notebooks, pens, three-hole punches in 8 pages - twice as many as the actual study of history - which would require using documentation to corroborate your stories. As an example of how she really confuses the terms - she relates that her mother wrote down her own family memories which, she reiterates, was not genealogy via documents, but family history because her mother remembered it - which included the story of how her father came to this country as a 14 year old boy. I have a journalistic news-flash - that is NOT her mother's story. That would be her grandfather's story - via hearsay. Her mother may be remembering what her father told her (which is important to record), but research into the documentation may reveal an entirely different - or greater - set of events. She may have heard the story wrong, she may be remembering details wrong - much like the telephone game. But the author sees nothing wrong with this - and extoles this reflection as the only thing you need to write your family history. WRONG on so many levels. Yes, this is a personal memory, which should be included in your family history - but if you pass down a memory only, as the family history - you run the risk of passing down the family fiction!
Whatever
Journalist D.G.[Debby Greene] Fulford with her brother--syndicated columnist Bob Greene--wrote "To Our Children's Children: Preserving Family Histories for Generations to Come." In this book, they presented lists of seemingly simple questions to prod memory and discussion to capture family stories.

With the success of that book many readers asked for another helpful tool in writing family histories. "ONE MEMORY AT A TIME: Inspiration and Advice for Writing Your Family Story" is written by D. G. Fulford on her own as an answer to that plea.

Debbie Fulford gives you stories from her family storehouse, encouragement, perspective, and tips. I like the boxed summaries at the end of the chapters.

"One Memory At a Time" delivers two important gifts:
--the sense that writing family stories is important, and
--permission to let it all be whatever it is.

"Your stories will go this way and that way, too, twisting and turning. This is fine. Permit yourself to ramble. A family history is a magnet. One thought attracts anohter." . . In this way, your story gets told."

Her writing is lyrical and declarative by turn, according to her purpose. She sprinkles questions from "To Our Children's Childrn" throughout the book to good effect. These are both items that would seem to be BETTER TOGETHER.

--Janet Grace Riehl, author Sightlines: A Poet's Diary
Zainian
I missed reading Fulford's earlier book (To Our Children's Children), but I'll certainly look for it now. That book has many questions to trigger your memories for writing.
This book (One Memory at a Time) builds on the earlier book but the emphasis is on showing us how easy it is to write a small descriptive memory. The author inspires and reassures us that we can get those onto paper and that our families will thank us for the effort.
I liked her tone in the book and the advice was very encouraging. She says the writing doesn't have to follow a timeline. Just record bits and pieces as they come to you, then later arrange those for your family history.
The book's fairly slim and would be most useful to have both books at the same time.
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