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eBook What Am I Doing Here ePub

by Bruce Chatwin

eBook What Am I Doing Here ePub
Author: Bruce Chatwin
Language: English
ISBN: 0099769816
ISBN13: 978-0099769811
Publisher: Vintage UK (November 29, 2001)
Pages: 384
Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory: Reference
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 734
Formats: lrf mobi txt doc
ePub file: 1752 kb
Fb2 file: 1288 kb

What am I doing here/Bruce Chatwin.

What am I doing here/Bruce Chatwin. What am I doing here? I am flat on my back in a National Health Service hospital hoping, praying, that the rigors and fevers which have racked me for three months will turn out to be malaria – although, after many blood tests, they have not found a single parasite. I have been on quinine tablets for thirteen hours – and my temperature does seem to be sliding down.

Bruce Chatwin (1940–1989) was the author of In Patagonia, The Viceroy of Ouidah, On the Black Hill, The Songlines, and Utz. His other books are What Am I Doing Here and Anatomy of Restlessness, posthumous anthologies o. . His other books are What Am I Doing Here and Anatomy of Restlessness, posthumous anthologies of shorter works, and Far Journeys, a collection of his photographs that also includes selections from his travel notebooks. Start reading What Am I Doing Here? on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

ON YETI TRACKS This April, having spent the hottest part of the year in the Central Australian desert, I felt the urge to get out of that tired red country and clear my head among some mountains.

ON YETI TRACKS This April, having spent the hottest part of the year in the Central Australian desert, I felt the urge to get out of that tired red country and clear my head among some mountains ad always wanted to walk in the valleys around Mount Everest and remember, as a boy, going to a slide-lecture of the Hillary-Tensing climb and forming a very vivid impression of rivers rushing with snowmelt, bamboo bridges, forests of rhododendrons, Sherpa villages and yaks. I wanted to see the Tibetan Buddhist monasteries that lie on the Nepalese side of the frontier.

What Am I Doing Here (1988) is a book by British author Bruce Chatwin containing a collection of essays, profiles and travel stories from his life

What Am I Doing Here (1988) is a book by British author Bruce Chatwin containing a collection of essays, profiles and travel stories from his life. It was the last book published during Chatwin's life and draws on various experiences from it. These experiences include trekking in Nepal, sailing down the Volga, interviewing Madeleine Vionnet and making a film with Werner Herzog.

What Am I Doing Here? book. As an example the following is from Mrs.

Bruce Chatwin's first book In Patagonia (1977) was a landmark in travel writing. Traveler, aesthete and a connoisseur of the exotic, Chatwin was a major British literary voice who also wrote On the Black Hill, The Viceroy of Ouidah, The Songlines and Utz before his death in 1989. Bibliographic information. What Am I Doing Here.

What Am I Doing Here? - infobox Book name What Am I Doing Here? title orig translator.

pseudonym birthname birthdate birth date19400513 birthplace near Sheffield, England deathdate death date and age1989011819400513 deathplace Nice, France occupation Author, Travel Writer. Chatwin was born on 13 May 1940 at his maternal grandparents' house in Dronfield, near Sheffield, England.

In this collection of profiles, essays and travel stories, Chatwin takes us to Benin, where he is arrested as a mercenary during a coup; to Boston to meet an LSD guru who believes he is Christ; to India with Indira Ghandi when she attempted a political comeback in 1978; and to Nepal where he reminds us that 'Man's real home is not.

This is the last of Bruce Chatwin's works to be published while he was still alive (he penned the introduction in 1988, a few . In this text, Bruce Chatwin writes of his father, of his friend Howard Hodgkin, and of his talks with Andre Malraux and Nadezhda Mandelstram.

In this text, Bruce Chatwin writes of his father, of his friend Howard Hodgkin, and of his talks with Andre Malraux and Nadezhda Mandelstram. He also follows unholy grails on his travels, such as the rumour of a "wolf-boy" in India, or the idea of looking for a Yeti.

What am I doing here. by. Chatwin, Bruce, 1940-1989. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger1 on September 27, 2011.

In this collection of profiles, essays and travel stories, Chatwin takes us to Benin, where he is arrested as a mercenary during a coup; to Boston to meet an LSD guru who believes he is Christ; to India with Indira Gandhi when she attempted a political comeback in 1978; and to Nepal where he reminds us that 'Man's real home is not a house, but the Road, and that life itself is a journey to be walked on foot.
Jeronashe
Very good Chatwin. Some flashes of brilliance and superb writing. But it is a collection without much of a connecting thread. Still yet, wonderful to read if you appreciate this fine author.
BlackBerry
some of the essays on thos book are among the best chatwon ever wrote, particularly the East Asian ones. Some of the rssaus are lesser. No matter: Chatwin is a ,aster, amd this is recommended for anyone who wants a glimpse into his elegant, erudite style.
Aiata
I little expected to find a fellow hunter of all things to do with Kalmyk nomads, an inhabitant of the "mythical present", desirous of Marvellian ensnarement. What am I doing here? I stumble, and enraptured, I fall. (Rather a lot of typos, though. Tisk, tisk.)
Na
I thought this would be more of a travel book, but instead, it is a series of essays mostly of people Chatwin found interesting. For this reader, many of the essays were boring -- the subject matter or the person being written about was often too obscure or exotic. Out of loyalty to the author, I forced myself to read them, but, as the book went on, I began worrying more about my loyalty to me, the reader. I started skipping over some of the essays and ultimately, couldn't wait till the book ended. I usually like books like this, but this one only made me drowsy.
Frdi
Too moch Bruce Chatwin.and not so interesting. I liked In Patagonia much better, probably becsuse I live in.South America. And also ha been to Patagonia.
Magis
What if Mozart, Schubert or John Lennon had lived longer? Bruce Chatwin (BC;1940-89) died older, but also still brimming with ideas and material to research and write about for decades to come, about a vast array of topics and persons. Before his death he published five novels, two of which were turned into movies. The year 1988 was busy indeed: his novel “Utz” almost won the Booker prize and he corrected and edited his best stories and wrote a few more for this collection of 35 of what he considered his best pieces. He attributed his early demise to a rare bone marrow disease picked up in China.
He quickly rose from the ranks of auction house Sotheby to a senior position. It gave him plenty of contacts to embark on a travelling & writing career that led him to e.g. Patagonia, West Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and China. Researching “The Viceroy of Ouidah” in Benin during a failed coup, he was mistaken for a white mercenary and narrowly escaped death by firing squad. Other adventures are described in his novels and is this collection.
He always remained an independent author. Only one of the 35 stories in this collection was commissioned. The rest was conceived and researched by himself and were first published in often prestigious papers and journals.
This volume provides some of the background for the novels he composed. It also contains stories from the world of trading in fine art, portrayals of what he considered unique personalities, travel stories, and reviews of expressions of art and artists he found important. Was he an important thinker, writer and essayist? I think he was a quirky thinker whose memory is fortunately kept alive by reprints of his books. This collection is exciting and has never a dull moment.
lets go baby
This is Bruce Chatwin's dying opus. He edited the pieces in What Am I Doing Here (a quote from one of Rimbaud's letters, writing home from Egypt) whilst weak, fevered and dying from AIDS in 1988. It is the first and best of the collections of Chatwin's shorter writings, composed of articles written when writing for the Sunday Times Magazine in the early 1970s, other newspaper articles, Granta contributions and other miscellaneous pieces.

This compendium, arguably more than any of his other travel books and novels, gives a good insight into the complex and fascinating life Chatwin lived, always in pursuit of the bizzare, the exotic, the beautiful and a good story. Chatwin's writings cover themes as dispirate as travel, art, politics, people and literature. Always discussed in a terse, erudite style that became his trademark. The breadth and depth of Chatwin's knowledge is incredible, thus these writings are not the most accessible. Some appreciation of art history, literature and anthropology for example is necessary to comprehend some of the more esoteric pieces in the collection.

Readers who give Chatwin the time will be able to unravel a wealth of brilliantly illuminated stories. From personal tales about family members, meetings with fabulously well connected and artistic people - such as George Costakis the Soviet art collector and Madeline Vionnet the French dressmaker, descriptions of his travels to far flung places - Patagonia, Afghanistan, China, searching for yeti in the Himalayas - the list goes on, one never fails to marvel at the rich tapestry that comprised Chatwin's life. Certainly, he lived a life about as far from the mundane as it is possible to get.

How did Chatwin manage to constantly encounter such fascinating and varied people and draw out their stories? Part of the reason lies in his connections from his days working as Sotheby's, another explanation lies in his innate charm that seduced men and women all over the world. Also it should be remembered that Chatwin was frequently liberal with the truth in order to tell a story that fitted with his own remarkable perception of the world and its inhabitants. At times he put the fictional process to work in odd instances - his biographical piece on the artist Howard Hodgkin for instance has been declared innacurate by Hodgkin himself, and this as explained in the bibliographical note was published as a 'portrait of the artist' to accompany the catalogue for the Tate Gallery exhibition 'Howard Hodgkin's Indian Leaves'! How did Chatwin get away with it? The truth will probably never fully out, but I would recommend Nicholas Shakespeare's excellent biography 'Bruce Chatwin' for readers interested in finding out more about Chatwin's life.

As a final note, I agree with the opinion of Salman Rushdie that the four short pieces at the end of the book 'Tales of the Art World', written in the last year of Chatwin's life are among the best he ever wrote. Four final drops of genius that Chatwin left before departing this world.
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