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eBook Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton of Six Continents ePub

by Jim Malusa

eBook Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton of Six Continents ePub
Author: Jim Malusa
Language: English
ISBN: 157805141X
ISBN13: 978-1578051410
Publisher: Counterpoint (April 28, 2008)
Pages: 336
Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory: Reference
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 307
Formats: doc docx lrf txt
ePub file: 1230 kb
Fb2 file: 1138 kb

His book, Into Thick Air, is equally hard to pass up. People seem to lie in wait for Jim. An Afar man who teaches . My only warning is to think twice about reading Into Thick Air if those close to you already question your grip on reality.

His book, Into Thick Air, is equally hard to pass up. An Afar man who teaches English in Djibouti, an Australian family that lives in a dust bowl shack with whip snakes in the outhouse and a pedal radio for communications, and a Russian wedding party filling the only café in town, all ambush him and force their hospitality, food, water pipes, and drinks on him. The drinks often contain alcohol, which both delays him and slows his progress when he finally wobbles away. Your chuckles, guffaws, and belly laughs will confirm their suspicions.

Where most aim to ascend the heights, writer and botanist Jim Malusa plumbed the depths. 5 people like this topic

Where most aim to ascend the heights, writer and botanist Jim Malusa plumbed the depths. 5 people like this topic.

What are all of these random places. The belly-buttons or Anti-Summits of the world, the lowest depression on each of the 7 continents (except Antarctica-that one can't be reached because it is buried in a mile of ice). he was out there in the desert, the salt, dodging cars, getting lost and finding his ways to these depressions.

Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton of Six Continents

Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton of Six Continents. His journeys took him to Lake Eyre in the arid heart of Australia, along Moses’ route to the Dead Sea, and from Moscow to the Caspian Sea. He pedaled across the Andes to Patagonia, around tiny Djibouti in the Horn of Africa, and from Tucson to Death Valley.

Narración de las expediciones realizadas por el norteamericano Jim Malusa, en su calidad de botánico, a lugares inóspitos o inseguros de diferentes países de América, Africa, Asia, Europa y Oceanía.

Got it. We value your privacy. Narración de las expediciones realizadas por el norteamericano Jim Malusa, en su calidad de botánico, a lugares inóspitos o inseguros de diferentes países de América, Africa, Asia, Europa y Oceanía. La característica peculiar de sus viajes fue la utilización de la bicicleta para llegar a su destino. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

Jim Malusa chronicles his adventures in the book, Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton . For Jim Malusa, it's a race to the bottom. In 1996, Malusa, a botanist, hit the road on his bike seeking the lowest points on the planet. He started in Australia and it’s been downhill ever since

Jim Malusa chronicles his adventures in the book, Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton of Six Continents and spoke with host Bruce Gellerman. He started in Australia and it’s been downhill ever since. Over the next six years he pedaled to Death Valley, the Dead Sea, and the depths in between. Jim Malusa chronicles his adventures in his new book ‘Into Thick Air: Biking to the Bellybutton of Six Continents. Jim, welcome to Living on Earth! MALUSA: Hello! I'm glad to be here. GELLERMAN: Why the belly button?

Bella Coola Gnar Segment (from INTO THE MIND) - Продолжительность: 6:04 Sherpas Cinema Recommended for yo.

Bella Coola Gnar Segment (from INTO THE MIND) - Продолжительность: 6:04 Sherpas Cinema Recommended for you. 6:04. I ride a motorcycle around the city and relax part 4 NewChannel 225 зрителей.

Malusa Jim. Год: 2010. ISBN 13: 978-1-578-05184-7. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Obama's Enforcer: Eric Holder's Justice Department.

With a scientist's eye, Malusa vividly observes local landscapes and creatures. As a lone man, he is overfed by grandmothers, courted by ladies of the night in Volgograd, invited into a mosque by Africa's most feared tribe, chased by sandstorms and hurricanes-yet Malusa keeps riding. His reward: the deep silence of the world's great depressions.

With plenty of sunscreen and a cold beer swaddled in his sleeping bag, writer and botanist Jim Malusa bicycled alone to the lowest point on each of six continents, a six-year series of “anti-expeditions” to the “anti-summits.” His journeys took him to Lake Eyre in the arid heart of Australia, along Moses’ route to the Dead Sea, and from Moscow to the Caspian Sea. He pedaled across the Andes to Patagonia, around tiny Djibouti in the Horn of Africa, and from Tucson to Death Valley. With a scientist’s eye, he vividly observes local landscapes and creatures. As a lone man, he is overfed by grandmothers, courted by ladies of the night in Volgograd, invited into a mosque by Africa’s most feared tribe, chased by sandstorms and hurricanes — yet Malusa keeps riding. His reward: the deep silence of the world’s great depressions. A large-hearted narrative of what happens when a friendly, perceptive American puts himself at the mercy of strange landscapes and their denizens, Into Thick Air presents one of the most talented new voices in contemporary travel writing.
Llanonte
This has to be one of the best travelogs I have ever read. The writing style is very witty and informative. I would put Jim Malusa right up there with Paul Theroux and Bill Bryson. His wit with metaphors is fantastic. Too bad he hasn't written more. As for the two star review because the trips to the lowest places on earth did not constitute a real adventure, you have to be kidding. Most Americans would be scared to death to ride a bike from Moscow to the Caspian Sea or to Djibouti. Most of these places are well off the beaten track, without a lot of services and often interacting with locals that have never seen or a very unaccustomed to tourists. That is not a real adventure? Malusa adds a fair amount of spicy factoids and historical interest items but in a way you are not conscious you are getting a lesson. He did some homework on these places before he left and not just where are the best tourist attractions. The lessons are nicely woven into to the present conditions and culture of the places he visits. Along that line he is also a biologist or naturalist of some sort and his descriptions of natural aspects of the adventures are interesting without being preachy or too academic. He does sometimes use names for species without a lot of description so sometimes if you aren't familiar with the species by name you have a hard time picturing what he is talking about but, not always. If you are tuned into the natural world to that level you will get that much more out of it. But that is a very minor criticism.

Jim Malusa please think up some other wacky adventure on your bike to write about, preferably in some cultures as different as possible from the USA. God willing!
Umi
Jim Malusa is only able to reach escape speeds with a Patagonian breeze at his back or on the last curve down to the Gulf of Aqaba. He presents an irresistible target as he pedals to the lowest points on six continents. His book, Into Thick Air, is equally hard to pass up.

People seem to lie in wait for Jim. An Afar man who teaches English in Djibouti, an Australian family that lives in a “dust bowl shack with whip snakes in the outhouse and a pedal radio for communications,” and a Russian wedding party filling the only café in town, all ambush him and force their hospitality, food, water pipes, and drinks on him. The drinks often contain alcohol, which both delays him and slows his progress when he finally wobbles away. Jim faces many obstacles in his travels--missing his young family, battling headwinds, and struggling up hills--but only fails at one: resisting the temptation to stop and talk. And eat. And drink.

A Jordanian family welcomes the American bicyclist passing their house. They show him every photograph they own, feed him goat soup, dress him in local clothing, entertain him with card games, and give him breakfast after he spends the night. By then, they knew each other’s stories, because, “[g]uest and host knew that they would only have this day, so they had to tell everything about themselves that day.” Jim must have used each of his nine Arabic phrases more than once during the visit.

Other characters that catch the author’s eye and impede his progress include a “four-pound rat-dog with a fogged-over eye;” a Coptic priest who is a Mr. Natural look alike; a hyena, the “slouching prince of poor posture and worse dental hygiene,” that he imagines he hears from his sleeping bag at Wadi Rum; and a Russian musician who “follows the international dress code of accordion players and appears to be from a neighboring planet.”

If you’re looking for a book on bicycle maintenance, this isn’t the book for you. On the other hand, there are useful tips: a good weld on the frame of your bike can hold from Moscow to the Caspian Sea (verified by Jim), and installing a second inner tube, and a second hole in the rim for the valve stem, will let you repair a flat without tools: just pump up the second tube (unverified).

If you want to know the best times to visit the most famous museums in the world, this isn’t the book for you. If you’re looking for a guide book to five star--no, four star-- no…OK, if you require any stars, or hot water, in your hotels, this isn’t the book for you.

If you’re looking for a fact-dense history of the areas Jim pedals through, this isn’t the book for you. On the other hand, he does provide intriguing factoids that could bolster street cred in the right circles: Henry David Thoreau endorsed celibacy, Moscow was twice burned by invaders in the 16th century, and the Las Vegas, NV Yellow Pages devoted 92 of those pages to Entertainment, Adult the day he visited.

This is biologist Jim Malusa’s first book. Several of the journeys originally appeared on Discovery Channel Online. In his quotidian life, he hasn’t strayed far from home. Jim still lives in Tucson, where he grew up and studied writing with Ed Abbey. His story telling skills are no secret in his home town: he is one of Barbara Kingsolver’s favorite writers.

My only warning is to think twice about reading Into Thick Air if those close to you already question your grip on reality. Your chuckles, guffaws, and belly laughs will confirm their suspicions.
Felhalar
I haven't finished this yet, but it is a fairly good read. I had just finished reading "Miles From Nowhere" by Barbara Savage, "Just Ride" by Grant Petersen, and "Two Wheels and a Map" by Bob Neubauer, which were all fantastic reads! I probably blazed through those in about a month, so I may have hit the ceiling in terms of cycling books. I will say that the book is good so far, but as far as world travel cycling literature goes, the book "Miles From Nowhere" is a cut above the fray.
FailCrew
This is a very enjoyable and well-written book about bicycling and culture. If you enjoy cycling this is a must read. If you know nothing about cycling this is still a great book to enjoy. Malusa's wit and perspective are unique and very readable. He has a open personality and shows that by dropping expectations one can remain fully open to the pleasures and lessons available from traveling to unexpected places. I cannot recommend it enough. Pull up a chair and enjoy this excellent book!
Fordregelv
I'm just finishing off reading Into Thick Air,I enjoyed every page of it. Jim's phrasing of his experiences makes you smile frequently, his descriptions of the land and people are lively, almost wished he had written a book per trip so he could write in more detail. I just found the photos he took on these trips on his flicker website, so if you get the book enjoy these pictures as you read along, they add a lot to the story! I think anyone who likes travel stories will enjoy this book.
Gavigamand
I'd like Jim Malusa to write another book. His writing is super, as is his insight into the cultures he immerses himself in. I read this book on my iPad and often jumped to Maps to follow Jim along as he traveled. What amazing travels!
Quinthy
This is a well-written and warm account of several bicycle adventure tours into the lowest points on Earth. It is saved from being just another bike adventure book by Jim Malusa's humor and his deftly woven interplay between his misadventures and his deep knowledge of the geology and ecology of the areas he travels through.
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