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eBook Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time ePub

by Michael Shermer

eBook Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time ePub
Author: Michael Shermer
Language: English
ISBN: 1559275138
ISBN13: 978-1559275132
Publisher: Macmillan Audio; Abridged edition (September 1, 1998)
Category: Occult & Paranormal
Subcategory: Religios
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 407
Formats: azw doc mbr docx
ePub file: 1358 kb
Fb2 file: 1854 kb

Michael Shermer is the author of The Believing Brain, Why People Believe Weird Things, The Science of Good and Evil, The Mind Of The Market, Why Darwin Matters, Science Friction, How We Believe and other books on the evolution of human beliefs and behavior.

Michael Shermer is the author of The Believing Brain, Why People Believe Weird Things, The Science of Good and Evil, The Mind Of The Market, Why Darwin Matters, Science Friction, How We Believe and other books on the evolution of human beliefs and behavior. com, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, and an adjunct professor at Claremont Graduate University.

Learn about the strange things people believe in, and why. Superstition and belief in supernatural phenomena are by no means left in the past. Even today, people believe in a wide range of absurd things, such as divination, creationism or alien abductions

Learn about the strange things people believe in, and why. Even today, people believe in a wide range of absurd things, such as divination, creationism or alien abductions. Some of these things may induce nothing worse than weary head shakes, and some can actually be dangerous. Why do these pseudosciences persist? Why do people believe in them? Why People Believe Weird Things attempts to answer these puzzling questions.

Start by marking Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition .

Start by marking Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Shermer, science historian and true crusader, also reveals the more dangerous side of such illogical thinking, including Holocaust denial, the recovered-memory movement, the satanic ritual abuse scare, and other modern crazes.

Why People Believe Weird Things: Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time is a 1997 book by science writer Michael Shermer. The foreword was written by Stephen Jay Gould. In the first section, Shermer discusses the ideas that he has towards skepticism. He also explains his conversion to Deism from New Age mysticism (to which he had converted from being a Fundamentalist Christian Baptist).

Distributed in Canada by H. B. Fenn and Company Ltd. "Science Defended, Science Defined" originally appeared in the journal Science, Technology, and Human Values, 16, no. 4 (Autumn 1991), 517-539. Why people believe weird things: pseudoscience, superstition, and other confusions of our time, Michael Shermer; foreword by Stephen Jay Gould. Includes bibliographical references and Index. ISBN 0-8050-7089-3 (pb. 1. Pseudoscience.

Vanity Fair Why do smart people believe weird things? Why do so many people believe in mind reading, past-life .

Scientific historian, and director of the Skeptics Society, Michael Shermer debunks these extraordinary claims in a no-holds-barred assault on the popular superstitions and confused prejudices of our time. Exploring the very human reasons behind otherworldly phenomena, conspiracy theories and cults Shermer explains why are they are so appealing to so many.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-293) and index. I. Science and skepticism

Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-293) and index. Science and skepticism. I am therefore I think : a skeptic's manifesto - The most precious thing we have : the difference between science and pseudoscience - How thinking goes wrong : twenty-five fallacies that lead us to believe weird things. II. Pseudoscience and superstition

In an entirely new chapter, Why Smart People Believe in Weird Things, Michael Shermer takes on science luminaries like physicist . com/?book 0805070893

com/?book 0805070893.

Believe Weird Things debunks these nonsensical claims and explores the very human reasons peopl. might just be the best business book of the year. Why people believe weird things. 68 MB·3,658 Downloads  . FAST COMPANY Adam Grant 9780143124986 Give. 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don't Do: Take Back Your Power, Embrace Change, Face Your Fears, and Train Your Brain for Happiness and Success. 236 Pages·2014·1000 KB·77,803 Downloads·New!

The message of this book has been that, while there are many different possibilities, not all of these constructed pasts-not all of the possibilities-are equally plausible.

The message of this book has been that, while there are many different possibilities, not all of these constructed pasts-not all of the possibilities-are equally plausible he past we deserve. In every generation, thinkers, writers, scholars, charlatans, and kooks (these are not necessarily mutually exclusive categories) attempt to cast the past in an image either they or the public desire or find comforting. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Argues that the search for meaning and spiritual fulfillment often results in the embracing of extraordinary claims and controversial ideas.
Uriel
There are two things I really liked about this book. First, Shermer raises a much-warranted alarm for all of us when he explains the distorting influence of confirmation bias and intellectual attribution bias on everyone’s development of beliefs; we are all at risk of standing in our own, distorted, self-ingratiating echo chambers. Second, he explains how we can combat the development of distorted beliefs through the use of measured skepticism. That said, with three chapters dedicated to debunking creationism and three chapters dedicated to debunking holocaust denial, a full one third of the book’s 18 chapters deals with these two topics. If you have to contend with anyone who subscribes to these views, this book is a valuable, in-depth resource. If not, you may feel you want to just bust through some sections. I do have to contend with a creationist, so I was pleased with the depth of coverage on that topic, but I don’t have to deal with any holocaust deniers and found myself anxious to get through that section. Regardless, there are many other ‘weird’ beliefs touched on, so it’s a great read. A great book from a great thinker of our time; highly recommended.
The Sphinx of Driz
I didn't have a problem with most of the author's arguments or conclusions. My biggest problem with it was, it wasn't very well written. I mean, it really does read like it was a collection long magazine pieces, that although about the same topic, have been cobbled together into book form, and therefore it doesn't flow very well.
Xinetan
I've always been curious why humans have such faulty logic, and this books goes into great pains to explain some of the more natural reasons that humans are prone to believe weird things. The author describes not just scenarios he's dealt with, but scenarios that have occurred in history and some of the arguments made. All in all, it's an interesting read if you've ever had a close encounter with a New Age website detailing its pricing catalog for remote psychic activation of ethereal DNA. However, if you really want to study more on this topic, I strongly recommend "Mistake Were Made (But Not By Me)" which details actual studies done on various human ... thinking errors.
Cktiell
Michael Shermer's "Why People Believe Weird Things" is a terrific book. Wow.

I cannot emphasize enough what an enjoyable read this book is for anybody tired of being surrounded by people who view the world as some sort of unsolvable supernatural puzzle. Because the world isn't!

Sure, we can't explain the entire world. If we could, we wouldn't need science or reason or philosophy or psychology or logic or anything--if we could, we could just recite the same dogmas and platitudes of earlier generations and never have to bother thinking about anything beyond how things make us feel.

...Like a lot of people do.

This book systematically moves through a large number of the more persistent myths of our age--from Biblical creationism, to Holocaust denial, to psychic detectives--and while it spends quite a bit of time exploring the strangeness and the details of such ideas, it also spends quite a bit exploring why such beliefs are ultimately false, why people choose to believe such things, and how we can avoid such errors in our own thoughts.

Reading it, I constantly found myself wanting to force it onto everyone I talked with, whether they would agree with me about it or not. This book is a weapon against lazy thinking--particularly its chapter, "How Thinking Goes Wrong: Twenty-five Fallacies that Lead Us to Believe Weird Things"--a chapter that I wouldn't mind seeing expanded into an entire book of its own--and I really could not recommend it more highly.

Most of the book originally appeared as essays in "Skeptic" magazine, so it may feel a bit episodic at points--but holy cow, what great episodes! Also, there's a huge section in the middle dedicated to Holocaust denial--perhaps more than the subject warrants, as arguing down people who believe the Holocaust never happened is not all that difficult. All right, all right, all right already, the sky is blue, humans need water, you got me. (Shermer wrote an entire book about Holocaust denial, "Denying History," so it's obviously an important topic to him, and he does make it interesting.) Also, some of the slower pieces seem to have been saved for the end, and the book does feel a bit uneven at times, but overall, I just felt absolutely gleeful reading this.

The famous alien autopsy video, TV psychics, Edgar Cayce, the 1980s Satanic Panic, even the cult of writer Ayn Rand--all are not safe here, and the book is worth its cost just for the many brilliant parallels it draws between Creationism and Holocaust Denial.

There is just so much nonsense out there threatening to indoctrinate our children, dictate our lives, and make us afraid, that this is just nothing but refreshing; this exudes truth and reason; this should be read by everyone, and I do mean everyone.

Read it, read it, read it--and be enlightened.
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