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eBook You Are Here: Why We Can Find Our Way to the Moon, but Get Lost in the Mall ePub

by Colin Ellard

eBook You Are Here: Why We Can Find Our Way to the Moon, but Get Lost in the Mall ePub
Author: Colin Ellard
Language: English
ISBN: 0767930754
ISBN13: 978-0767930758
Publisher: Anchor; 1 edition (August 10, 2010)
Pages: 328
Category: Behavioral Sciences
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 816
Formats: mbr docx lit txt
ePub file: 1741 kb
Fb2 file: 1511 kb

Colin Ellard, a behavorial neuroscientist at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, probes this and other shortcomings of human spatial intelligence in his delightfully lucid book You Are Here.

Colin Ellard, a behavorial neuroscientist at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, probes this and other shortcomings of human spatial intelligence in his delightfully lucid book You Are Here. The Canadian version of the book is titled Where Am I? Apparently, Americans don’t like asking for directions.

Ellard lives in, and regularly gets lost in, Kitchener, Ontario. Why do some city green spaces work, but others do not? Might social networks that we establish on the Internet (. For example, I believe he's overly optimistic if not completely delusional that navigating in cyberspace via virtual reality, Google Earth, and the like will get us back out there exploring and playing in the real world

Colin Ellard is an experimental psychologist at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. It is encouraging to me that admits he still gets lost in his home town

Colin Ellard is an experimental psychologist at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. It is encouraging to me that admits he still gets lost in his home town. This book held my attention through a turbulent plane ride back to Canada, and despite the information presented, I still managed to misplace my car in the Park and Fly parking lo. .

Finding our way in the world is something we tend to take for granted, and while most of us will never experience . Colin Ellard on You Are Here. Top 10 Ways to Avoid Getting Lost. Take the time to smell (and look at) the roses

Finding our way in the world is something we tend to take for granted, and while most of us will never experience the extremes described above, the maps we generate in our heads may not always match up with the world that’s out there. Take the time to smell (and look at) the roses. The difference between expert way-finders and the rest of us probably has much to do with being able to pay attention to details.

Colin Ellard just wrote a book on the topic: You Are Here: Why We Can Find Our Way to the Moon, but Get Lost in the Mall. Ellard, a psychology professor at the University of Waterloo, took NPR's David Greene on a walk toward a woodsy area of Washington, . to help Greene learn to appreciate being lost - which doesn't take long. For example, if you want to remember where you parked the car, Ellard says, you can make up a story about something that's nearby. Let's look around here

InYou Are Here, psychologist Colin Ellard explains how, over centuries of innovation, we have lost our instinctive ability to find our way, as we traverse vast distances in mere hours in luxurious comfort.

InYou Are Here, psychologist Colin Ellard explains how, over centuries of innovation, we have lost our instinctive ability to find our way, as we traverse vast distances in mere hours in luxurious comfort

Originally published as: Where am I? Toronto : HarperCollins, 2009. What science says about our spatial intelligence and how it shapes our connections to nature, cities, homes, and virtual worlds"-Dust jacket subtitle.

Originally published as: Where am I? Toronto : HarperCollins, 2009.

Canadian experimental psychologist Colin Ellard explains why humans so easily get lost - and offers some tips on.

Canadian experimental psychologist Colin Ellard explains why humans so easily get lost - and offers some tips on what they can do about i. In his book, You Are Here: Why We Can Find Our Way to the Moon, but Get Lost in the Mall, Canadian experimental psychologist Colin Ellard tries to show why we get lost and how understanding this phenomenon can lead to better design of spaces such as dwellings, roads, parks and offices. Much of our problem boils down to a lack of observational skills.

His recent book You Are Here: Why We Can Find Our Way to the Moon, but Get Lost in the Mall, places the human preoccupation with space into psychological, philosophical, and anthropological contexts. No content was found. Lab Log. January 13, 2012.

An eye-opening exploration of the intriguing and often counter-intuitive science of human navigation and experience of place.In the age of GPS and iPhones, human beings it would seem have mastered the art of direction, but does the need for these devices signal something else—that as a species we are actually hopelessly lost. In fact we've filled our world with signs and arrows. We still get lost in the mall, or a maze of cubicles. What does this say about us? Drawing on his exhaustive research, Professor Collin Ellard illuminates how humans are disconnected from our world and what this means, not just for how we get from A to B, but also for how we construct our cities, our workplaces, our homes, and even our lives.

Vetalol
This book has several interesting facts and figures contained in it. I was looking for a book on geography related and how we treat the world around us. After an Amazon search I came on this book.

It was a pretty good read. At times it reads a little like a text book and drags a bit. However, some of the thoughts and facts about the way humans look and react to everyday environments makes it interesting. Everything from how city design can affect our daily decisions, how we can predict where busy intersections will be years from now, to how casino's are like website designers trying to lure you in and keep you there.

Overall, this is not a book I'd give my wife but something I'd bring up at the dinner table.
Blackworm
Too much academic and technical detail. Can be boring
MrCat
This was a fascinating read--especially the sections comparing human and various animal navigators, especially the desert ants.
Gozragore
This book is a great combination of well established research and writing for people without a scientific background.

Colin knows how to engage with his audience. I recommend this to anyone with an interest in evidence based Wayfinding.
Hatе&love
Interesting one day read of the definition of "space", "distance", "directions"..author has used many researches on identifying how ants, pigeons, goose, rats and humans have their ways to find their ways out. Yet also bringing out our perceptions on space, directions, office space, home and work architecture..the theme of this book is on how our modern lives and tools have destroyed our abilities to identify and use natural spots/positions to identify our positions and coordinates. Fine examples on Inuit tribes, Polynesians, Puluwot and Bedouin of their exceptional navigational methods in which we modern people have lost the ability of. It is also the way we rely too much on technologies....book also brings out CRP differences between America and EU and how they affect our lives. Interesting read to reflect we only educate our kids in a confined space which only limited our vision and inhibit our natural instinct of explorations...at the end, we should get out of our PS3, Wii, but allow kids to learn from nature where provide infinite and correct geographical pattern recognition. We humans, also have a inner map within ourselves, but it has been shut off from what we see, but not what we feel.
Villo
This book was somewhat interesting while it was exploring and explaining how people and animals orient themselves in space (visually and otherwise), although I expected somewhat more than a few anecdotes about how and why people become disoriented.

But about two-thirds through the book, the author detours into an all-too-conventional diatribe against suburbs/exurbs, automobility, and urban sprawl. And while these are worthwhile topics in themselves, it's an awkward fit with the rest of this book-- the first two-thirds are about science (not politics), and this makes the remainder seem excessively and inappropriately political.

The effect was like going to a museum or concert, only to have the docent or musician lurch into partisan politics ("But of COURSE we all know that **** is an idiot!")-- even if the political discussion is interesting, it's the wrong place and the wrong time. And, the political discussion here didn't seem all that original or interesting-- if you want to read this viewpoint, you'd do better to read something by James Howard Kunstler.

And it's a shame-- this reader is left with the sense that this could have been a much better book.
Anen
Colin Ellard has written a delightful book that persuasively stakes a claim for the primacy of space in human cognition. The first half covers some of the scientific research into the psychology of space and is well informed by Ellard's solid working knowledge of neuroscience, cognitive science, ethology, animal behavior, and evolutionary psychology, as well as by his first-hand knowledge of a number of specialty areas within each of these fields. The book's second half takes up questions about interacting with our spatial environment that are of considerable practical significance. For example, what happens to us as we become disconnected from our natural world? What makes for psychologically satisfying living and office spaces? Why do some city green spaces work, but others do not? Might social networks that we establish on the Internet (e.g., on Facebook) facilitate greater interaction with the real spatial environment? How about the increasing availability on the Internet of virtual reality? You may disagree with some of Ellard's views on these issues. For example, I believe he's overly optimistic if not completely delusional that navigating in cyberspace via virtual reality, Google Earth, and the like will get us back out there exploring and playing in the real world. But I can guarantee that you will never be bored. And too you will likely learn all sorts of things that you may never before have heard of, in my case, isovists, Second Life, proxemics, sound sculpturing, calm technology, to mention just a few. Accessibility poses no problem. The writing is engaging, often humorous, and pitched at the right level for the layperson. In short, this book is an instance of popularization of science at its very best.
Scientists often attempt to write books for the "intelligent layperson." Such books frequently miss the mark because the authors aim either too high or too low and their writing is pedestrian. Ellard nails it. This is not a book that you will buy and put off reading. Start it and you will be hooked. Ellard manages to be both funny and informative. This book will appeal to both spatial idiots like me who are forever losing their way and competent navigators. After you read the book, you will amaze your friends and neighbors with your new-found erudition on a host of topics, ranging from animal navigation to architecture. You may also amaze your spouse and children with your new path-finding skills.
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