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eBook The Eighth Day of Creation : Makers of the Revolution in Biology ePub

by Horace Freeland Judson

eBook The Eighth Day of Creation : Makers of the Revolution in Biology ePub
Author: Horace Freeland Judson
Language: English
ISBN: 0140178007
ISBN13: 978-0140178005
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New Ed edition (February 23, 1995)
Pages: 688
Category: Biological Sciences
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 477
Formats: lrf docx azw rtf
ePub file: 1907 kb
Fb2 file: 1316 kb

What Judson gives us is a picture of how the various scientists fed into each other's insights and experiment led into experiment.

What Judson gives us is a picture of how the various scientists fed into each other's insights and experiment led into experiment. 8 people found this helpful.

Horace Freeland Judson (21 April 1931 in Manhattan, New York – 6 May 2011 in Baltimore, Maryland) was a historian of molecular biology and the author of several books, including The Eighth Day of Creation, a history of molecular biology, and The Grea.

Horace Freeland Judson (21 April 1931 in Manhattan, New York – 6 May 2011 in Baltimore, Maryland) was a historian of molecular biology and the author of several books, including The Eighth Day of Creation, a history of molecular biology, and The Great Betrayal: Fraud In Science, an examination of the deliberate manipulation of scientific data. Horace Freeland Judson was born on 21 April 1931, in Manhattan, New York.

by. Judson, Horace Freeland.

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Horace Freeland Judson is a historian of molecular biology. In addition to his previous books, he has written for many magazines, including "The New Yorker" and "Time". In 1987 Judson received a MacArthur Prize Fellowship. He lives in Baltimore, Maaryland. Bibliographic information. The Eighth Day of Creation: Makers of the Revolution in Biology. Horace Freeland Judson.

The particular case that Horace Freeland Judson chronicles is the molecular biology revolution that happened .

The greatness of TEDoC lies in its deep, liberal arts approach. To Judson, anything that affects the course of scientific The Eighth Day of Creation (TEDoC for short, published in 1979) is a scientific history that shows how we get from vague misunderstanding to established scientific theory

In 1993, one of the best-ever science books went out of print in the United States. First published in 1979, The Eighth Day of Creation had achieved a rare blend of success, combining critics' acclaim and scientists' approval with strong commercial sales

In 1993, one of the best-ever science books went out of print in the United States. First published in 1979, The Eighth Day of Creation had achieved a rare blend of success, combining critics' acclaim and scientists' approval with strong commercial sales.

Horace Judson has corrected a few minor errors (remarkably few for such a fact-filled book) . He has talked with nearly everyone involved, and 'The Eighth Day of Creation' is a unique oral history of a scientific revolution; to my knowledge there has been nothing else like i.

Horace Judson has corrected a few minor errors (remarkably few for such a fact-filled book), given a sharper emphasis to Frederick Sangers' work on protein sequencing to reflect his (Judson's) conviction of its central importance, and added some personal details to a biographical sketch of Rosalind Franklin.

Horace Freeland Judson - 1987 - Johns Hopkins University Press. The Roman Revolution of the Eighth Century: A Study of the Ideological Background of Die Papal Separation From Byzantium and Alliance with the Franks

Horace Freeland Judson - 1987 - Johns Hopkins University Press. John T. Edsall - 1980 - Journal of the History of Biology 13 (1):141 - 158. 1543 And All That: Word and Image in the Proto- Scientific Revolution. Guy Freeland & Antony Corones (ed. - 2000. Is It a Revolution? Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):429-437. The Roman Revolution of the Eighth Century: A Study of the Ideological Background of Die Papal Separation From Byzantium and Alliance with the Franks. David Harry Miller - 1974 - Mediaeval Studies 36 (1):79-133.

Huston
I have always loved this book. I lost the original I had. This is an "OK" printing but is not on acid-free paper and the copy I bought through Amazon is yellowed considerably. Given that this is really a personal library book you might want to keep: buy a the newer versions of the book. I did, and it's easier to read.

All that aside, this is an amazing story of how different disciplines converged to create our understanding of the structure and function of DNA, and the whole discipline of molecular biology.
terostr
Back in the 1990s, in my early 50s, I thought about shifting into genetic counseling, and took a series of undergraduate biology courses in preparation. A most exciting day was when, in the Cell and Molecular Biology lab, my lab partner and I isolated DNA. I felt as if I were walking on air! Later, writing up a lab report, I reread large chunks of The Eighth Day of Creation, to see that the various experiments we carried out in that lab replicated the pathway to understanding that had gone on in the 1950s and '60s.

I didn't make the move I was thinking about, but that course and the day we actually had a blob of DNA in our test tube, remains with me to this day. And this book put it all into context. Even today, it stands as a wonderful review of the process that resulted in a major "paradigm shift" (a la Kuhn) in biology. While The Double Helix is a fun, gossipy way to get into popular biology literature, The Eighth Day of Creation is where the real story is to be found.

Today, in the week of the bicentennial of Darwin's birth, I recommend this book as a great way to follow the thread from Darwin's deep insights of the mid-19th century to what we knew by the last 3rd of the 20th century. Obviously, the story continues from there, but the period covered by the book was seminal. And yes, some elementary biology is good background for reading it, but just as important is an interest in the social networks that underly an area of scientific endeavor. What Judson gives us is a picture of how the various scientists fed into each other's insights and experiment led into experiment. He's very good at describing important biological concepts -- readers with just a little biology under their belts will have no trouble following him.
Wooden Purple Romeo
When I received the book, advised by a friend, I got a shock. So thick with such small writing, I thought I'd never get through it! What a mistake; the text engulfed me and although not always prepared to such exposure of scientific material, my interest rarely subsided. I was fascinated to see how imagination and common sense were instrumental to push research. How ideas that are so obvious today seemed as wild hypotheses. How people just missed them. And how "gentlemanly" research was in those days. People spoke to each other, compared results, even before printing an abstract. Today, to preserve priority claims, scientists rush to the editor! Fierce competition has taken over.
DNA is central to our epoch and it's difficult to imagine that reputed scientists thought that the molecule was stupid, that it had nothing to do with genetics and that a genetic code was a hopeless idea. And the worst was still to come once the structure of DNA had been discovered! The eighth day of creation, a beautiful title, is a great book for those interested in the background of research work.
Kecq
This book was to replace a copy I've had for twenty years, and probably loaned to someone. It is a classic, and still probably the best introduction to the people and development of dna/rna-based science.
Qusserel
This is a masterpiece, describing in a very interesting and readable fashion how the development and subsequent practice of molecular biology forever changed our knowledge of the structure and expression of genes. I was a student and later a lab head in that field during the period described in Judson's book, and nevertheless found the book very exciting and also informative.
Xtani
This book is a wonderful read. I find it very useful in my work which extends the discoveries that were made by Watson, Crick, Pauling, Monod, Nirenberg, and so many others. It can be read by anyone with an interest in biochemistry, genetics, and crystallography. It is emotionally moving. It shows the extreme dedication and exertion and time required to do scientific discovery. It shows how few resources and how little space were required to make the enormous steps that have led to the current understanding of genetics and protein chemistry.
Jode
Excellent book. I read it back in the early 1980's as an undergrad in college.. it was so exciting and eye-opening that I shifted gears in my college studies and became a scientist myself! Judson describes in beautiful detail the the pathways by which individuals from various scientific backgrounds, with all their various egos and frailties developed the field of molecular biology. Absolutely fascinating read! Looking forward to reading it again!
I like prompt answers and supply from Amazon side , thank you for this. The book is also very valuable and I feel happy to have it now.
Best Regards,

Gunay Kurcan
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