lind-peinture
» » Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History)

eBook Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History) ePub

by Hervé This

eBook Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History) ePub
Author: Hervé This
Language: English
ISBN: 023113312X
ISBN13: 978-0231133128
Publisher: Columbia University Press (January 4, 2006)
Pages: 392
Category: Biological Sciences
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 140
Formats: mbr doc mbr mobi
ePub file: 1635 kb
Fb2 file: 1376 kb

Taking kitchen science to a whole new (molecular) level, Hervé This is changing the way France―and the . Hervé This is a physical chemist of the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Paris.

Taking kitchen science to a whole new (molecular) level, Hervé This is changing the way France―and the world―cooks. captivating little book. One of the two founders of the science called molecular gastronomy, he is the author of Columbia's Kitchen Mysteries: Revealing the Science of Cooking and of several other books on food and cooking.

2005 : Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor . 2009 : "Building a Meal: From Molecular Gastronomy to Culinary Constructivism (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History)" (translator: Malcolm DeBevoise), Columbia University Press.

2005 : Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor (translator: Malcolm DeBevoise), Cambridge University Press. 2006 : La cuisine c'est de l'amour, de l'art, de la technique, Odile Jacob. 2007 : Construisons un repas, Odile Jacob. ISBN 978-0-231-14466-7. 2009 : Cours de gastronomie moléculaire n°1 : Science, technologie, technique (culinaires) : quelles relations?, Quae/Belin, Paris.

Molecular Gastronomy, This's first work to appear in English, is filled with .

This begins by reexamining and debunking a variety of time-honored rules and dictums about cooking and presents new and improved ways of preparing a variety of dishes from quiches and quenelles to steak and hard-boiled eggs. Looking to the future, Hervé This imagines new cooking methods and proposes novel dishes.

Hervé This (Author), Malcolm DeBevoise (Translator). Download (pdf, . 0 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

arts and traditions of the table: perspectives on culinary history. Molecular Gastronomy Exploring the Science of Flavor. Salt: Grain of Life Pierre Laszlo, translated by Mary Beth Mader. columbia university press {new york}.

The Best of Molecular Gastronomy at MolecularRecipes. com - Продолжительность: 3:07 Molecular Gastronomy Recommended for you. 3:07.

of the Table: Perspective. y Herve This Paperback £1. 6. Molecular Gastronomy" explains how to make them.

This item:Molecular Gastronomy Exploring the Science of Flavor (Arts & Traditions of the Table: Perspective. Thorvald Pedersen, EMBO Reports "This book is laden with science while rendering a clear approach to flavor. - Academia " captivating little book. This also shows us how to cook perfect French fries, why a souffle rises and falls, how long to cool champagne, when to season a steak, the right way to cook pasta, how the shape of a wine glass affects the taste of wine, why chocolate turns white, and how salt modifies tastes.

Series: Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary .

Series: Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History. Published by: Columbia University Press. This begins by reexamining and debunking a variety of time-honored rules and dictums about cooking and presents new and improved ways of preparing a variety of dishes from quiches and quenelles to steak and hard-boiled eggs. He goes on to discuss the physiology of flavor and explores how the brain perceives tastes, how chewing affects food, and how the tongue reacts to various stimuli.

Molecular Gastronomy book that doesn't cost silly money. Hervé This (pronounced Teess ) is an internationally renowned chemist, a popular French television personality. Molecular Gastronomy" This is a great book too! Sounds like my kind of cookbook :D. Molecular Gastronomy: Exploring the Science of Flavor (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History).

Molecular Gastronomy book Where chemistry and physics meet the culinary arts, this book brings science and food together

Molecular Gastronomy book. Overall, Molecular Gastronomy is a good book in Exploring the Science of Flavor, unusual to any of the cookbooks I have seen. Its beauty is in combining science with food, it’s a distinctive perspective and a new lens into understanding the art of cooking and flavor. Where chemistry and physics meet the culinary arts, this book brings science and food together. Understanding the nature of changes to foodstuffs brought on by cooking and preparation has the potential to improve your ability in the kitchen.

Hervé This (pronounced "Teess") is an internationally renowned chemist, a popular French television personality, a bestselling cookbook author, a longtime collaborator with the famed French chef Pierre Gagnaire, and the only person to hold a doctorate in molecular gastronomy, a cutting-edge field he pioneered. Bringing the instruments and experimental techniques of the laboratory into the kitchen, This uses recent research in the chemistry, physics, and biology of food to challenge traditional ideas about cooking and eating. What he discovers will entertain, instruct, and intrigue cooks, gourmets, and scientists alike.Molecular Gastronomy, This's first work to appear in English, is filled with practical tips, provocative suggestions, and penetrating insights. This begins by reexamining and debunking a variety of time-honored rules and dictums about cooking and presents new and improved ways of preparing a variety of dishes from quiches and quenelles to steak and hard-boiled eggs. He goes on to discuss the physiology of flavor and explores how the brain perceives tastes, how chewing affects food, and how the tongue reacts to various stimuli. Examining the molecular properties of bread, ham, foie gras, and champagne, the book analyzes what happens as they are baked, cured, cooked, and chilled. Looking to the future, Hervé This imagines new cooking methods and proposes novel dishes. A chocolate mousse without eggs? A flourless chocolate cake baked in the microwave? Molecular Gastronomy explains how to make them. This also shows us how to cook perfect French fries, why a soufflé rises and falls, how long to cool champagne, when to season a steak, the right way to cook pasta, how the shape of a wine glass affects the taste of wine, why chocolate turns white, and how salt modifies tastes.
Dishadel
For the casual or unprofessional reader a title like Molucular Gastronomy has the allure of eating a bowl of stewed prunes. It sounds like a drudge, but physical chemist author Hervé This on the staff of the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Paris, applies science to questions of food, cooking and eating and keeps it fascinating. He applies science to questions of why does a tannic wine taste awful when paired with a salad tossed with an acidic dressing, does beef marinade better in a white or red wine, and the best ways to soften lentils. He breaks his book up into four parts. Part one covers kitchen issues and he dissects many old saws of cooking either explaining why the actually work or showing why they don’t. Part two looks at flavor and how it works. In part three he applies science to issues such as bread baking, lumps in food, foams, Spanish Hams and foie gras. Part 4 addresses how the scince of gastronomy will impact the cuisine of tomorrow. He breaks the book up into digestible little bits – the 361 page book contains 101 subparts and subtracting out the introductions, the subparts run a page or two. Here and there they get a little technical but the majority are accessible to nontechnical reader while still of interest to the technical. Anyone interested in food, cooking or eating should find this book a fun read.
blodrayne
A wonderful collection of answers to esoteric questions, some of which I had received from my children when they began cooking in their early years, (4-9 years old) and I have to admit that I did not know a lot of the correct answers. I wish that I had deard of this book, or that it was even available 40 years ago. The explanations are in relatively basic English, aside from the proper names of nerves and chemical compounds.

I would not recommend this book for anyone looking for simplistic half-answers. The explanations do require some education in several areas of science, as well as Senior high-school English.

I heartily recommend it to anyone who has a serious curiosity about why foods smell, feel, and/or taste good, bad, or indifferent.
IWantYou
Having used many books about the science of cooking, this one helped, but most people will want to look elsewhere. I would recommend Potter's Cooking for Geeks or anything from America's Test Kitchen. Don't look here for many molecular gastronomy tips that will use chemicals or liquid nitrogen in the kitchen, this deals more with the science behind food and how humans interact with it. You will find a lack of recipes here as well.
Invissibale
This book is one of many that points to the relationship between science and the culinary arts: to the physical and chemical magician behind the curtain of delight. A book that attempts to do that has certain responsibilities and the greatest of these may be accuracy. I lost count of the mistakes, but some of the simplest are the temperature conversions from celcius to fahrenheit. The cook attempting any of the procedures in the book should double-check the temperatures recommended and the fahrenheit-based cook should just beware.
The other important duty of such a book is clarity. Molecular Gastronomy isn't so much translated from the French as it transcribed by machine. Very often it's impossible to figure out through the haze of translation what the author is actually recommending.
On a lesser level, one could ask for a bit of originality and this book does have a bit. The level of ambition is also lamentably low: does anyone really think that putting a spoon in a champagne bottle delays the decarbonation? Are blowing and stirring the only methods of cooling over-hot coffee? How concerned are you that the yolk of your hard-boiled egg be centered in the white?
For most readers, Harold McGee's splendid On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen is vastly superior.
Ydely
I love thinking about the science of food. I love cooking.

This book was interesting, though not necessarily engaging. I would recommend this to anyone who really likes Molecular Gastronomy and wants to have some fun trying things out in the kitchen.

For those just getting into it, or those who are more 'dabbling' try Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking."
Kazimi
Fantastic book.
Jogas
Exactly what I was looking for! This book takes an extremely scientific look at real world cooking. I am a Chef in a modernist kitchen. I know how to counter act countless unfavorable flavors and textures. I don't however, know why all these reactions happen. After reading this book I've used it as a reference several times.
This was a gift for my son-in-law, and I hope he found it interesting. I wasn't too impressed, but I was hoping for some recipes and more information about techniques. But he is a scientist and a home-chef, and so maybe he will like it.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only