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eBook How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever ePub

by Jack Horner,James Gorman

eBook How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever ePub
Author: Jack Horner,James Gorman
Language: English
ISBN: 0525951040
ISBN13: 978-0525951049
Publisher: Dutton Adult (March 19, 2009)
Pages: 256
Category: Biological Sciences
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 704
Formats: lrf docx doc rtf
ePub file: 1423 kb
Fb2 file: 1404 kb

How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever is a 2009 book by paleontologist Jack Horner and James Gorman

How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever is a 2009 book by paleontologist Jack Horner and James Gorman. The book outlines Horner's theory for being able to resurrect a maniraptoran dinosaur by altering the genes of a chicken embryo. In 2010, a paperback version was published under the title How to Build a Dinosaur: The New Science of Reverse Evolution.

Jack Horner, the scientist who advised Steven Spielberg on the blockbuster film Jurassic Park and a pioneer in bringing paleontology . How to Build a Dinosaur is a tour of the hot rocky deserts and air-conditioned laboratories at the forefront of this scientific revolution.

In the 1980s, Horner began using CAT scans to look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs, and he and his colleagues have been delving deeper ever since.

Readers eager to learn how to "build a dinosaur" may therefore get impatient with the authors, and may be tempted to put the book down and not go further

He is the author of several books, including two previous books with Horner. Readers eager to learn how to "build a dinosaur" may therefore get impatient with the authors, and may be tempted to put the book down and not go further. This would be a mistake, since in the latter half of the book the authors get down to explaining what kind of techniques or knowledge may be necessary to produce a creature that for all practical purposes, . in terms of its skeletal structure and general appearance would be a living dinosaur.

How to Build a Dinosaur book. Rather than zeroing in on ancient dinosaur DNA, Horner and his colleagues instead focus on evolutionary development, or evo-devo, as they term it. We know that the embryos of multiple creatures develop in a similar fashion, for a time featuring arm and beg buds as well as tails.

Dinosaurs could walk the earth again within five years, says paleontologist Jack Horner. The great value of How to Build a Dinosaur is that it illuminates how the work of paleontologists has changed in the past few decades. No longer are they all digging up bones in the desert. It won’t happen the way it did in Jurassic Park, the novel and movie inspired in part by Horner’s work. No active DNA from history’s big lizards is likely ever to be found, he says. Many are making their discoveries in laboratories through the study of evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo.

Jack Horner, the scientist who advised Steven Spielberg on Jurassic Park, and a. .How to Build a Dinosauris a tour of the hot rocky deserts and air-conditioned laboratories at the forefront of this scientific revolution.

James Gorman; Jack Horner How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever. ISBN 13: 9781400161416. How to Build a Dinosaur: Extinction Doesn't Have to Be Forever. James Gorman; Jack Horner.

Download books for free How to Build a Dinosaur is a tour of the hot rocky deserts and air-conditioned laboratories at the forefront of this scientific revolution. Скачать (pdf, . 2 Mb) Читать.

Download books for free. In the 1980s, Horner began using CAT scans to look inside fossilized dinosaur eggs, and he and his colleagues have been delving deeper ever since. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

By: Jack Horner(Author), James Gorman(Author). 246 pages, illustrations. Publisher: Plume Books. Over a decade after Jurassic Park, Jack Horner and his colleagues in molecular biology labs are in the process of building the technology to create a real dinosaur.

A scientific advisor for the film, Jurassic Park, evaluates the potential for artificially growing a real dinosaur without ancient DNA, in an account that traces his team's paleontology research to reveal the relationships between dinosaurs and birds and how it may be possible to stimulate latent tyrannosaurus rex genes in a chicken.
Nto
The book goes over the potential of how to make a dinosaur in this day and age and the theory of how to do so. The entire first portion of the book is a recount of the history of dinosaurs and their evolution thereof. The second part of the book pertains to gene manipulation concerning drugs versus master genes using chickens as a base genome example. The last portion of the book goes over the concise Evolution from bird to mammal and explores the theory of reversing evolution.
A great read if you can follow it. There is a lot of scientific verbiage that would be difficult for the layman do you understand. Very interesting theories and very entertaining overviews. Jack Horner takes you in depth in seeing just how close we are to creating the Chickenosaurus.
Steelraven
I love dinosaurs, and I really enjoyed this book. The criticisms I have are that it was on the short side, it could have been better organized, and I feel that he was too focused on chickens. I have heard of other bird species retaining some primitive characteristics, for example (if I remember correctly) hoatzin chicks having claws on their wings. He doesn't mention anything like this, but I feel that he should have because it is relevant to his argument. Other than that I found it very interesting. When he talks about creating a dinosaur, it isn't what you expect. He also goes into some of the science, which I think is easier to understand if you have at least some science background.
Buzatus
When reading the first half of this book, this reviewer found it difficult at first to connect its subject matter with the title of the book. The expectation was that the book was going one devoted to genetic and metabolic engineering as applied to embryology. Instead the authors devote the first half to matters of paleontology and the art of fossil hunting. Readers eager to learn how to "build a dinosaur" may therefore get impatient with the authors, and may be tempted to put the book down and not go further.

This would be a mistake, since in the latter half of the book the authors get down to explaining what kind of techniques or knowledge may be necessary to produce a creature that for all practical purposes, i.e. in terms of its skeletal structure and general appearance would be a living dinosaur. Studying these pages is fascinating, and indeed gives one more reason for believing that if the authors or other biologists succeed in bringing this about, then this would be the most awesome feat in scientific and technological history.

What is most important about the author's proposals is that they are not dependent on having the genomes of long extinct dinosaurs. Instead, they seek to adjust the timing of the growth patterns that led to the evolution of birds from nonavian dinosaurs. This is to be done via the embryo of a domestic chicken. But changing the timing of metabolic and growth processes, this timing being regulated by genes, must respect what actually occurred in the evolutionary development of the bird from the dinosaur. Otherwise what results is a kind of "freak" that may be of interest in general but will not represent a genuine dinosaur of the kind that roamed the earth millions of years ago.

A small amount of space is devoted in the book to the ethics and dangers of this kind of effort. These discussions are important but did not convince this reviewer that the author's proposals should not be carried out. On the contrary, they should be done immediately without any mental reservation. Right now. Today.
Pettalo
This is a new and refreshing look at paleontology. While the book is nominally about turning a bird into a dinosaur, it is really about exciting new developments in paleontology. Horner shows how paleontology is expanding beyond digging for dinosaurs and moving into molecular biology and evolutionary development (evo-devo). Horner weaves several different fields of biology and shows how inter-disciplinary studies have revolutionized the field. He chronicles the work of Mary Schweitzer, who discovered red blood cells and (perhaps) cartilage in a 68-million year old T-rex, and Hans Larson, who is investigating ancestral genes in chicken embryos. I had followed news from paleontology relatively closely for a lay observer, but even I was shocked at some of the evo-devo research currently being done.

Hopefully, this book will inspire more students to go into biology. Turning a chicken into a dinosaur might be just the right hook to stimulate interest in these exciting new developments in evo-devo.

My one suggestion for the book is that because it covers so many fields, Horner ends up summarizing or quoting the works of others. He tells their stories effectively. But at some point, I wonder if perhaps it would have been better to produce a joint book, with articles from several of the contributors in the field. However, it is also useful to have one voice to guide the reader through the science. Since Horner is not a native to molecular sciences (his expertise is traditional paleontology), he is perhaps better suited to explaining the complexities of genetics to lay readers.

P.S. - Be sure to check out the Discovery Channel's documentary (Dinosaurs: Return To Life?) on this topic. It is a nice complement to the book.
Danskyleyn
I don't think that this book reaches a large audience. In my family, this was read by my sister-in-law and myself and we're the only two with science backgrounds. Personally it's great for me though as you don't have to be a paleontologist to follow the narrative. I'm stoked by the potential of what's going on in paleo biology these days.
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