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eBook The Next Fifty Years : Science in the First Half of the Twenty First Century ePub

by John Brockman

eBook The Next Fifty Years : Science in the First Half of the Twenty First Century ePub
Author: John Brockman
Language: English
ISBN: 0753817101
ISBN13: 978-0753817100
Publisher: Orion Pub Co (November 2003)
Pages: 320
Category: History & Philosophy
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 756
Formats: azw mbr rtf txt
ePub file: 1242 kb
Fb2 file: 1487 kb

The essays contain speculation by the authors about the scientific and technological advances that are likely to occur in their various fields in the first half of the 21st century.

Nearly everyone in the book has blind faith in science as a panacea to the world's ills.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Nearly everyone in the book has blind faith in science as a panacea to the world's ills. Frequently I felt as if I were reading a middle ages book praising the glory of God; here, the word "God" has been replaced with "Science," but the uncritical praise is the same.

Аудиокнига "The Next Fifty Years: Science in the First Half of the Twenty-First Century", John Brockman. Читает Henry Leyva, Jennifer Wiltsie, Oliver Wyman и Simon Prebble. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Twenty-five writers discuss the future of science in their respective fields of study.

US: Vintage Books UK: Weidenfeld & Nicholson. Twenty-five writers discuss the future of science in their respective fields of study. Several of these writers surpass ordinary trend spotting to entertain some rather pulse-quickening ideas completely beyond the kin of the so-called dominant paradigm.

The Next Fifty Years book. No doubt something will happen in the next fifty years that will make Brockman's eminently reasonable choice of scientists seem improperly skewed; yet it is just this baseline of expectation that will allow us to compare. By "us" I mean those, not myself, who will be alive fifty years from now!) The truth is, something always happens that surprises us.

This fascinating and unprecedented book explores not only the practical possibilities of the near future, but .

This fascinating and unprecedented book explores not only the practical possibilities of the near future, but also the social and political ramifications of the developments of the strange new world to come. بعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات. The Next Fifty Years: Science in the First Half of the Twenty-first Century

Personal Name: Brockman, John, 1941 . On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book

Personal Name: Brockman, John, 1941-. Rubrics: Science Forecasting. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Слушайте The Next Fifty Years (автор: John Brockman, Simon Prebble, Oliver Wyman, Henry Leyva, Jennifer . Theoretical physicist and bestselling author Paul Davies examines the likelihood that by the year 2050 we will be able to establish a continuing human presence on Mars.

Слушайте The Next Fifty Years (автор: John Brockman, Simon Prebble, Oliver Wyman, Henry Leyva, Jennifer Wiltsie) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Слушайте аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. Psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi investigates the ramifications of engineering high-IQ, geneticially happy babies.

Years : Science in the First Half of the Twenty-First Century. Thinking about the next fifty years. com User, July 14, 2003. John Brockman has brought together a group of thinkers to create an online think tank called the EDGE.

The Next Fifty Years : Science in the First Half of the Twenty-First Century. In an attempt to overcome the great divide between literary intellectuals and scientists that . Snow defined as the "Two Cultures", Brockman created the EDGE to be "The Third Culture". The Next Fifty Years, is a collection of essays from some of the thinkers from the EDGE.

The Next Fifty Years (eBook). by John Brockman (Author)

The Next Fifty Years (eBook). by John Brockman (Author). A brilliant ensemble of the world’s most visionary scientists provides twenty-five original ed essays about the advances in science and technology that we may see within our lifetimes.

From Dolly the sheep to the Human Genome Project, the last fifty years have seen unprecedented leaps in our scientific understanding that have revolutionised our perception of ourselves, our world and our place in it. What, one might wonder, does the future have in store for us? Will we discover that our universe existed before the Big Bang or be able to 'swap' brains between different species? What is the future of happiness? In this dazzling collection, scientists at the very forefront of their fields, including Richard Dawkins, Lee Smolin, Sir Martin Rees and Ian Stewart, have been brought together to discuss the future of science, and the ways in which these dynamic changes will affect our daily lives.
Chilldweller
Another underwhelming entry from Edge and John Brockman (editor). These books are much less stimulating than they should be, and the included thinkers' perspective of reality shows science at its worst: narrow and arrogant, with a mechanistic disregard for life. Nearly everyone in the book has blind faith in science as a panacea to the world's ills. Frequently I felt as if I were reading a middle ages book praising the glory of God; here, the word "God" has been replaced with "Science," but the uncritical praise is the same.

Here are just a few examples of the pervasive scientific hubris and shocking disrespect for life:
* "At the beginning of the twenty-first century, chemists are in complete command of matter" (194)
* "One engaging possibility is that bacteria can be genetically engineered to excrete whole cogwheels, pistons, and springs" (198)
* "Humans are machines" (184-185)
* "We can be confident that all such discoveries will fall within our current canon of understanding" (199)
* "The world half a century from now will look different and work differently. It will be much richer. It will have far snazzier technology. It might even be ever so slightly happier." (241)

While these scientists feel "in complete command," moving toward a "snazzier, slightly happier future," they largely ignore the fact that the world is careening toward social, political, economic, and environmental disaster--and that all of these problems, which these scientists are blind to, are largely rooted in the mechanistic, patriarchal, modern scientific worldview which has sucked Spirit from the world.

It is interesting to consider the book as whole. The patterns that repeat throughout seem most likely to yield the surest and most spectacular advances: genetics, neuroscience, and computer science (the Bio, Info, and Cognitive segments of the familiar NBIC acronym--nano is hardly touched on here).

But in general, Edge scientists need a wake up call: technology cannot be the solution to all our ills. The solution is much bigger than that, and it would be nice if these scientists could at least address the future of science in the context of the world beyond their provincial specialties.
Cheber
The 25 essays (about 5-10 pages each) contained in this book are all from leading academic experts in their field. Hence they are very authoritative. In addition, and rather surprisingly, the overwhelming majority are well written. They are written geared to the layman, as opposed to the specialist, and hence they make a fairly good read members of that audience.

Despite the fact that the chapters have been leading by leading authorities there are still problems that flow through the book. The most important is that each author examines his or her field in isolation from others. Considering the fact that most revolutionary paradigm shifts have been as a result of "Kuhnian Revolutions" (see Thomas Kuhn's "The Structures of Scientific Revolutions") where radical changes in scientific theories have been brought about or significantly influenced by theories or concepts outside of the field this is not a minor oversight.

A second problem is inherent to forecasting the future, especially in terms of scientific advances. That is that it is inherently difficult to do. Witness the fact that leading minds in the past have not been able to do this in past. For example Turing, one of the leading minds in cybernetics and theoretical mathematics, did not predict the importance of computers to society in even a much smaller time frame (i.e., 20 years instead of 50). Even in the late 1950s and early 1960s he did not predict their rise in importance. During the late 1990s many of the leading minds at Cal Tech, for example, were not able to, on a consensual basis, even pick technologies that would be the most cutting edge within only 5 or 10 years is also revealing. Even one of the authors in one of the chapters in the book admits that many of the concepts and much of the language in theoretical physics in existence in the 1930s and 1940s did not even exist even in the period right up to the first world war.

In short, the book contains many well written essays with interesting perspectives primarily due to the authoritative nature of their authors but, considering the task of predicting so far in the future in fields in such perpetual and rapid flux (one that is inherently difficult), the essays can only be considered educated guesses that will, in all probability, be incorrect.
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