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eBook Birds of the Horn of Africa: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia and Socotra (Helm Field Guides) ePub

by Iain Robertson,John Fanshawe,Terry Stevenson,Brian Small,John Gale,Nigel Redman

eBook Birds of the Horn of Africa: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia and Socotra (Helm Field Guides) ePub
Author: Iain Robertson,John Fanshawe,Terry Stevenson,Brian Small,John Gale,Nigel Redman
Language: English
ISBN: 0713665416
ISBN13: 978-0713665413
Publisher: Helm (April 18, 2009)
Pages: 496
Category: Nature & Ecology
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 498
Formats: doc lrf lit txt
ePub file: 1854 kb
Fb2 file: 1827 kb

1) Birds of Ethiopia and Eritrea by Atkins/Ash 2) Ethiopia's Endemic . Local guides also used Birds of the Horn.

Fellow birders carried smaller Birds of Eastern Africa and kept asking to see my Redman guide. I recommend Redman's book strongly.

Terry Stevenson and John Fanshawe are the authors of the Helm Field Guide Birds of East Africa, and between them have over 50 years experience in leading bird tours and conducting conservation work in the region. Birds of the Horn of Africa: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia and Socotra Helm Field Guides. Nigel Redman, Terry Stevenson, John Fanshawe.

Birds of Ethiopia and Eritrea: An Atlas of Distribution African Handbook of Birds. A Field Guide to the Birds of East Africa. A Checklist of the Birds of Ethiopia Haile Selassie I University Press Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

and Socotra (Princeton Field Guides) Nigel Redman, Jerry Stevenson, and .

The horn of Africa consists of Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia, and Socotra, an area that is under-birded and thus less known than other parts of Africa. Some of this geographical area is off-limits to birders, yet with over 1,000 species recorded, is still an interesting and diverse place. Birds of the Horn of Africa: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia, and Socotra (Princeton Field Guides) Nigel Redman, Jerry Stevenson, and John Fanshawe Illustrated by: John Gale and Brian Small Princeton University Press ISBN13: 978-0-691-14345-3. Country of Publication. Birds of the Horn of Africa. A great help, preparing for my trip to go birdwatching in Ethiopia. Looking forward to it! Verified purchase: Yes Condition: New.

Princeton Field Guides. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, USA. 512 p. 213 color plates.

Nigel Redman, Terry Stevenson, John Fanshawe. The Horn of Africa has the highest endemism of any region in Africa, and around 70 species are found nowhere else in the world. Many of these are confined to the isolated highlands of Ethiopia and Eritrea, but a large number of larks specialise in the arid parts of Somalia and adjoining eastern Ethiopia, whilst the island of Socotra has its own suite of endemic species. The region is also an important migration route and wintering site for many Palearctic birds. This is the first field guide to the birds of this fascinating region, and a companion.

A small passerine bird in the swallow family from northern Africa and . Birds of the Horn of Africa: Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia and Socotra (Helm Field Guides). London: Christopher Helm.

A small passerine bird in the swallow family from northern Africa and southwestern Asia. Drawing by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The pale crag martin (Ptyonoprogne obsoleta) is a small passerine bird in the swallow family that is resident in northern Africa and in southwestern Asia east to Pakistan. It breeds mainly in the mountains, but also at lower altitudes, especially in rocky areas and around towns. Unlike most swallows, it is often found far from water. Reichenbach, Heinrich Gustav (1850).

John Fanshawe, Nigel Redman, Terry Stevenson. The writing is of a very high standard, and I am impressed by the overall quality of the plates and attention paid to local subspecies. Birds of the Horn of Africa is the premier field guide to the region.

Nigel Redman, Terry Stevenson and John Fanshawe, illustrated by John Gale and Brian Small, 2011. Second edn. London, UK: Christopher Helm. Within its remit, the book encompasses Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti and Somalia, as well as the small archipelago of Socotra, which although politically part of Yemen (and can only be visited via the latter) is Afrotropical in its avifaunal composition (the same is not necessarily the case for other taxa, including the islands' flora).

The Horn of Africa has the highest endemism of any region in Africa, and around 70 species are found nowhere else in the world. Many of these are confined to the isolated highlands of Ethiopia and Eritrea, but a large number of larks specialise in the arid parts of Somalia and adjoining eastern Ethiopia, whilst the island of Socotra has its own suite of endemic species. The region is also an important migration route and wintering site for many Palearctic birds. This is the first field guide to the birds of this fascinating region, and a companion to Birds of East Africa by two of the same authors. Over 200 magnificent plates by John Gale and Brian Small illustrate every species that has ever occurred in the five countries covered by the guide, and the succinct text covers the key identification criteria. Special attention is paid to the voices of the species, and over 1000 up-to-date colour distribution maps are included. This long-awaited guide is a much-needed addition to the literature on African birds and an essential companion for birders visiting the region.
Zargelynd
Basics: 2009, softcover, 496pp, field/identification guide, 213 color plates of all 1,000+ species in the region; range maps

This is another top quality book produced by the authors for the eastern region of Africa. Upon opening this book, you'll recognize many of the plates from their earlier work, "Field Guide to the Birds of East Africa" (see #6 below). You'll also see many new plates along with modifications of prior ones.

The artistry is very good, easily making this book equal to or better than any other field guide on African birds. The 213 color plates illustrate all 1,000+ species found in the four "Horn" countries of Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia (plus the island of Socotra, which belongs to Yemen). Nearly every bird is shown with multiple (2-5) drawings that display excellent detail. The Yellow Wagtail has 13 different illustrations that compare the wide variation of this species. The plates do a great job at showing variations between genders, ages, and subspecies. I especially appreciated the extra effort that went into separating out the many subspecies. Additional focus seems to have been given to in-flight poses for many of the non-passerines.

A brief paragraph is given for each bird across from its illustration. Although the amount of text may seem light, the information is very informative, to the point, and precise. About 80% of the information is on identification. A couple more lines are dedicated to habitat, distribution notes, and voice. You may want to take note of the font size, which is small and thin; consequently, you might want to have your reading glasses handy.

The range maps - one for each bird - shows the resident, breeding, and non-breeding ranges in three different colors. These maps reflect the bird's range within only the four countries and artificially stop at the political borders. The maps show very good detail; however, this is sometimes difficult to make out due to the shaded highland regions in the background and to the rather faint gray boundaries that separate the countries. Ranges of birds with a very restricted distribution (e.g., Sidamo Lark, Ash's Lark, Djibouti Francolin, Black-backed Cisticola) can be difficult to see with just a small dot representing the range. Inserting an arrow would have been helpful. Making a more prominent note of the 70+ endemics would also have been appreciated, versus simply burying the word "endemic" within the text.

In case you're wondering if you would need this book over the authors' prior book for East Africa, the answer is "Yes, if you are visiting any of these four countries." Twenty percent of the birds found in the Horn are not in the other book. Also, when there is overlap of the species between the two regions, the authors' have modified the plates to reflect the plumages of the local subspecies.

This is a superb guide that will be essential for birding in these countries. Being the only complete book for this region makes it even more indispensible.

1) Birds of Ethiopia and Eritrea by Atkins/Ash
2) Ethiopia's Endemic Birds by Urban
3) A Guide to Endemic Birds of Ethiopia and Eritrea by Pol
4) Ethiopia: In Search of Endemic Birds by Francis
5) Birds of Somalia by Ash
6) Field Guide to the Birds of East Africa by Stevenson
7) Birds of Africa South of the Sahara by Sinclair/Ryan
8) Birds of Kenya and Northern Tanzania by Zimmerman
9) A Checklist of the Birds of Ethiopia by Urban
(written by Soleglad at Avian Review or Avian Books, May 2009)
Keath
we used this book during our 27 day journey through Ethiopia. Its excellent and we would have been lost without it. The index is clear the images good and the descriptions of the birds very helpful - they highlight what you need to concentrate on.
Bukus
Being stationed in Djibouti I was amazed of all the birds that flew through the airfield. I tried to look them up but to no avail, I couldn't find a book that would help. Last week Mat Klope came by to perform a wildlife survey of the birds and animals in Djibouti and in his hand was this book. I was amazed that someone even took the time to log the regions where the birds live. I've worked in the Aviation industry since high school and repaired countless aircraft after a "bird strike." Learning more about the birds that live in the regions where I work
Weiehan
I've been using this book while working and traveling in the Horn of Africa. It has been very useful ... I really like the layout--the pictures are excellent representations of the species (and as one reviewer noted, subspecies). The flight profiles and range maps have been key to my identifying some birds--the hardest birds to identify I find are the plain ones and this book does a very good job of describing and showing the subtle variations required for positive identification. My copy is now dog-eared, coffee-stained, and marked up ... After 3 months, the binding is coming loose somewhat but the pages are still stitched in pretty well. It's been stuffed in backpacks, thrown on hot dashes, tossed around in a dive bag on the beach--so it's holding up very well all things considered!

If you are coming this way and you like birds, it's the book for you! Highly recommend.
Anardred
I was really excited to order this book and the color plates are terrific. However, the range maps are so minute that they're a joke. They are pretty well impossible to read, even with a magnifying glass. I realize that the only alternative is to have the range maps on a separate page, but that would be preferable to not being able to read them
Danrad
While heavy, it is comprehensive and easy to use. Excellent index and plates. Fellow birders carried smaller Birds of Eastern Africa and kept asking to see my Redman guide. Local guides also used Birds of the Horn...I recommend Redman's book strongly.
Budar
This is another excellent bird guide by the authors. On a recent trip to Ethiopia, I found this book to be an indispensable companion. The drawings are outstanding as is the text on each bird. The range maps and in particular the elevation guides were very helpful in this geographically variable country. The details of this guide are well covered in previous reviews and this book would be a welcome addition to the library of those who love to travel in Africa. I left this guide with our local semi-bird guide to encourage his growth in birding. He was both emotional and appreciative to receive this book. I bought a new one on my arrival home.
Ted Peterson
Lynnwood WA USA
I used this book when I studied tropical ecology in Ethiopia earlier this year. I won't repeat what others have said, but this is a very good field guide. One major flaw is that some species are given full species status or different names when that is not how they are recognized in current world checklists. That makes it difficult for those that use eBird or other listing databases.
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