lind-peinture
» » The Peregrine: With The Hill of Summer

eBook The Peregrine: With The Hill of Summer ePub

by Mark Cocker,J. A. Baker

eBook The Peregrine: With The Hill of Summer ePub
Author: Mark Cocker,J. A. Baker
Language: English
ISBN: 0007348622
ISBN13: 978-0007348626
Publisher: HarperCollins UK; Reissue edition (May 1, 2010)
Pages: 320
Category: Nature & Ecology
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 330
Formats: doc lit lrf lrf
ePub file: 1457 kb
Fb2 file: 1164 kb

Baker's only other book is 1969's The Hill of Summer . The book includes an introduction by Mark Cocker and notes by John Fanshawe. Prior to this book, little was known about Baker's personal life but this has now changed.

Though not as famous as The Peregrine, it enjoys much the same reputation for literary beauty and naturalist precision. He was born on 6 August 1926, to engineering draughtsman Wilfred and his wife Pansy Baker, and lived in Chelmsford. His secondary education was at King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford.

A. Baker's poetic prose has a hard intensity and an exquisite lyric grace that takes it far beyond the stereotypical stuff of larks ascending and questing voles. Cruelly beautiful and brutally exact, it sees the countryside anew to give us nature in the wild and in the ra. The Scotsman. Including original diaries from which The Peregrine was written and its companion volume, The Hill of Summer, this is a beautiful compendium of lyrical nature writing at its absolute best. For those with an interest in the Peregrine Falcon or classic natural history writing.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Peregrine: The Hill of Summer Diaries: The Complete Works of J. A. Baker as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The book was The Peregrine, by J. Baker. In fits and starts, it becomes clear to the reader that it is also a kind of autobiography

The book was The Peregrine, by J. In fits and starts, it becomes clear to the reader that it is also a kind of autobiography. It is structured as a diary, covering the months between October of 1962 and April of 1963, years that were as tumultuous as any others, here and abroad. But no events or news bulletins impinge on Baker’s narrative.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Including original diaries from which The Peregrine was written and its companion volume The Hill of Summer, this is a beautiful compendium of lyrical nature writing at its absolute best

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Including original diaries from which The Peregrine was written and its companion volume The Hill of Summer, this is a beautiful compendium of lyrical nature writing at its absolute best. Such luminaries as Richard Mabey, Robert Macfarlane, Ted Hughes and Andrew Motion have cited this as one of the most important books in 20th Century nature writing, and the bestselling author Mark Cocker has provided an introduction on the importance of Baker, his writings and the diaries – creating the essential volume of Baker's writings.

Including original diaries from which The Peregrine was written and its companion volume The Hill of Summer, this is a beautiful compendium of lyrical nature writing at its absolute best.

Baker's only other book is 1969's The Hill of Summer .

The Peregrine, which won the Duff Cooper Prize in 1967, recounts a single year from the author's ten–year obsession with the peregrines that wintered near his home in eastern England. The writing is lyrically charged throughout, as the author's role of diligent observer gives way to a personal transformation, as Baker becomes, in the words of James Dickey, "a fusion of man and bird.

J. Baker's extraordinary classic of British nature writingDespite the association of peregrines with the wild, outer reaches of the British Isles, The Peregrine is set on the flat marshes of the Essex coast, where J A Baker. Baker's extraordinary classic of British nature writingDespite the association of peregrines with the wild, outer reaches of the British Isles, The Peregrine is set on the flat marshes of the Essex coast, where J A Baker spent a long winter looking and writing about the visitors from the uplands - peregrines that spend the winter hunting the huge flocks of pigeons.

April: Woods and Fields. Baker’s extraordinary classic of British nature writingDespite the association of peregrines with the wild, outer reaches of the British Isles, The Peregrine is set on the flat marshes of the Essex coast, where J A Baker spent a long winter looking and writing about the visitors from the uplands – peregrines that spend the winter hunting the huge flocks of pigeons. April: Woods and Fields.

The Peregrine, which won the Duff Cooper Prize in 1967, recounts a single year from the author's ten–year obsession with the peregrines that wintered near his home in eastern England. The writing is lyrically charged throughout, as the author's role of diligent observer gives way to a personal transformation, as Baker becomes, in the words of James Dickey, "a fusion of man and bird."
Funky
Purchased this after listening to an interview with director Werner Herzog, who stated that this is the only book that he *requires* all of his film students to take. He writes:

"I’m Werner Herzog, I’m a filmmaker normally but I do read. The book I would really recommend is an obscure book published in 1967: “The Peregrine,” by J.A. Baker, who is somebody about whom we know nothing, literally nothing. He wrote in Great Britain when the last peregrines were dying out—now they have bounced back a little bit. He observes peregrines and it’s a most incredible book. It has prose of the caliber that we have not seen since Joseph Conrad. And an ecstasy—a delirious sort of love for what he observes.

The intensity and the ecstasy of observation is something that you have to have as a filmmaker or somebody who loves literature. Whoever really loves literature, whoever really loves movies, should read that book.

In a way, it’s almost like a transubstantiation, like in religion, where the observer becomes almost the object—in this case the falcon—he observes. He writes, for example, about the falcon soaring high up, and then higher and higher until the falcon is only a dot. Then he writes, “and then we swoop down,” as if he had become a falcon himself. And there’s a variety of moments where you can tell that he has completely entered into the existence of a falcon. And this is what I do when I make a film, I step outside of myself into an ekstasis in Greek, to step outside of your own body, a point outside. Baker steps into the fog and in an ecstasy of observing the world it is unprecedented."
Perilanim
No other way to put it: This book is a treasure of the English language.

In The Peregrine J.A. Baker describes how he tracked and trekked over months and miles in his native England to watch and record in language like you've never read how peregrines hunt and feed and fly and play and rest. The language he uses to construct his sentences is like none other I have ever read. It's a vivid mix of nature writing and the best poetry. The text is so dense, the sentences are so packed with words bringing life to action--there really is no reading experience I can compare this to. I could only stand to read a few pages at a time; "relish" not "read" would be the better word there.

This is more than "nature writing," too. Baker gets under the very surface of life to expose what lurks. Just a few excepts to illustrate:

"The hardest thing of all to see is what is really there."

"Terror seeks out the odd, and the sick, and the lost."

“There is no mysterious essence we can call a 'place'. Place is change. It is motion killed by the mind, and preserved in the amber of memory.”

“Whatever is destroyed, the act of destruction does not vary much. Beauty is vapour from the pit of death.”

I cannot give The Peregrine anything less than 5 stars. It's more than a book, it is a reading experience. Reading it will expand your senses. It will enliven you and enrich you as a human being. I think that's the greatest thing we can expect from any book.
Yadon
J. A. Baker's "The Peregrine" is a remarkable achievement in nature writing for both its style and substance, easily among the finest ever in the category. The book, in diary form, details the author's extensive viewing and tracking of peregrine falcons, but more accurately, his obsessive stalking of these birds of breathtaking speed and predatory skill, in the Essex countryside outside London during the fall of 1962 through the spring of 1963.

Baker's singular style is the very model of concision. It is stark and stunning prose, often more like preternatural poetry, exceptional in its beauty. He is not simply reporting the activities of the peregrines, their prey, and their surroundings, he is fully within the action and its environs, and so, therefore, is the reader. It is an unmatched reading experience. Baker displays an uncanny ability to describe color, movement, landscape, and weather with brilliant clarity and nuance.

Though less than 200 pages, this is not a quick or easy read. Best digested in small bites, I found it too intense for long sessions. Also, there are many passages, individual sentences, and striking word combinations which must be reread a time or two and lingered over in order to fully appreciate.

There is a somewhat lurid focus on the peregrines' kills, unflinchingly described with a certain admiration. Indeed, as the seasons progress, the author increasingly identifies with the peregrine, simultaneously grousing a growing disdain for the human species: a thoroughly fascinating narrative posture. This is essential reading; an altogether unforgettable book.
Zehaffy
Werner Herzog recommended this book as an excellent study in how to focus on one thing and describe it to perfection - to become the thing onto which all focus is given. What a jewel of a book. I look at books and measure their success in my library by the number of lines that are underlined. I gave up on this book because it was becoming underlined page by page. This is precious, well-crafted literature, a deep study of word crafting that brings mind movies forward. This book is becoming my handbook on how to imagine a scene, describe it poetically and precisely and then, let all the rest of the art follow. A must read for those who love a well-wordsmithed book.
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only