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eBook Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age ePub

by Leland Purvis,Douglas Rushkoff

eBook Program or Be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age ePub
Author: Leland Purvis,Douglas Rushkoff
Language: English
ISBN: 159376426X
ISBN13: 978-1593764265
Publisher: Soft Skull Press; 1st edition (September 6, 2011)
Pages: 152
Category: Technology
Subcategory: Science
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 588
Formats: azw docx doc mbr
ePub file: 1597 kb
Fb2 file: 1439 kb

With illustrations by Leland Purvis. In ten chapters, composed of ten commands accompanied by original illustrations from comic artist Leland Purvis, Rushkoff provides cyberenthusiasts and technophobes alike with the guidelines to navigate this new universe.

With illustrations by Leland Purvis. Thinking twice about our use of digital media, what our practices are doing to us, and what we are doing to each other, is one of the most important priorities people have today-and Douglas Rushkoff gives us great guidelines for doing that thinking.

Program or Be Programmed. 128. Essential Reading.

Original line drawings by Leland Purvis. com First printing 2010. Program or Be Programmed.

In ten chapters or commands, Douglas Rushkoff lays out how to live in this new world

In ten chapters or commands, Douglas Rushkoff lays out how to live in this new world. Some of this advice will seem straightforward, some of it will need explanation, and some of it will seem more than a little counterintuitive. But all of it is delivered with verve and insight that makes you rethink your interactions on the web. Are you driving your life here, or only a passenger? If you want to get your hands on the wheel, this book is a good place to start.

In ten chapters, composed of ten commands" accompanied by original illustrations from comic artist Leland Purvis, Rushkoff provides cyberenthusiasts and . It’s really that simple: Program, or be programmed.

In ten chapters, composed of ten commands" accompanied by original illustrations from comic artist Leland Purvis, Rushkoff provides cyberenthusiasts and technophobes alike with the guidelines to navigate this new universe.

In ten chapters, composed of ten commands, accompanied by original illustrations from comic artist Leland Purvis, Rushkoff provides cyberenthusiasts and technophobes alike with the guidelines to navigate this new universe. This is a friendly little book with a big and actionable message.

This is a friendly little book with a big and actionable message. World-renowned media theorist and counterculture figure Douglas Rushkoff is the originator of ideas such as viral media, social currency and screenagers.

Praise for "Program or Be Programmed" "Now that much of what Rushkoff has predicted over the years has come to. .Timothy Leary Rushkoff is damn smart.

Praise for "Program or Be Programmed" "Now that much of what Rushkoff has predicted over the years has come to pass, he is uniquely qualified to write what may be one of the most important and instructive books of our times: "Program or be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Ag. In it, he outlines ten different ideas that information technology is biased towards; biases that can cause discord in our lives. As someone who understood the digital revolution faster and better than almost anyone, he shows how the internet is a social transformer that should change the way your business culture operates.

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10 Logo Design Books That Will Inspire You. Ever wanted to learn more about branding, but felt intimidated by the amount of books out there? . Responsive Web Design by Ethan Marcotte - A must read for any web designer today. Responsive Web Design Book (Brian has Tuts+ eBook for Kev). Craft beautiful designs that respond to your users& needs with Responsive Web Design. Responsive Web Design Is Really Handy Now With People Viewing The Web On Different Devices.

The debate over whether the Net is good or bad for us fills the airwaves and the blogosphere. But for all the heat of claim and counter-claim, the argument is essentially beside the point: It’s here; it’s everywhere. The real question is, do we direct technology, or do we let ourselves be directed by it and those who have mastered it? “Choose the former,” writes Rushkoff, “and you gain access to the control panel of civilization. Choose the latter, and it could be the last real choice you get to make.”In ten chapters, composed of ten “commands” accompanied by original illustrations from comic artist Leland Purvis, Rushkoff provides cyber enthusiasts and technophobes alike with the guidelines to navigate this new universe.In this spirited, accessible poetics of new media, Rushkoff picks up where Marshall McLuhan left off, helping readers come to recognize programming as the new literacy of the digital age––and as a template through which to see beyond social conventions and power structures that have vexed us for centuries. This is a friendly little book with a big and actionable message.
Hulore
The title is a bit misleading, since the book isn't really about programming or being programmed.

Rather, it's an effective look at how various pervasive digital technologies - always-on email and messaging, social networks, website "commenting" that allows hiding behind anonymity - are contributing to the polarization of political views, the devaluing of face-to-face time and leisure activities, and so on.

A boatload of books have been written on this topic, but this one stands out to me in two ways. First, the author hits on things "we all know" feel "wrong" about the effects of some of these technologies, but he summarizes them in observations that immediately cut to the heart of the dissonance. For example, he notes that digital devices are "timeless" (in that nothing about their programming accounts for or is affected by linear time or the passing of time), whereas the passing of different time intervals defines many aspects of our existence and interactions, and it is by juxtaposing these opposing natures that the conflict arises: in order to more effectively use the machines, we are drawn into behaviors that ignore what used to be a defining characteristic of our rhythms of life. The second way in which this book stands out is that unlike others, it at least tries to provide concrete advice on how to avoid these pitfalls. It's not a Luddite book - it doesn't argue the technologies should (or could) be abolished, only that we must be thoughtful in making choices about how to incorporate them into our lives, lest our lives instead adapt to the algorithms.

There are a few minor errors of fact (eg "the Internet was designed to survive a nuclear attack" is an often-repeated meme that is simply incorrect) but they're incidental to his main points and generally forgivable. It's a concise read and makes its thought-provoking points without beating around the bush.
Faulkree
The title suggests that the central idea is whether we master technology or let it control us and I was prepared for a bit of a rant. What Rushkoff has done, however, is place digital technology in its appropriate place in the evolution of civilization. By looking at how societies responded to the introduction of the alphabet, the printing press, and now digital media, he frames the importance of not being so distracted by our bright shiny gadgets that we ignore their inherent biases. His focus on the interactive, collaborative nature of digital technology shows both its promise and its shortcomings. I was quite chagrined when he took my favorite argument against coding for all (I can drive a car without knowing how to build one), and pointed out that by approaching cars solely as consumers, we missed the biases that changed not only how we get from place to place, but literally changed our national landscape, took us into wars, and endangered our planet. Oh, right. In the end, Rushkoff is not so much advocating "coding for all." as he is suggesting that we need to be educated about the inherent biases in our technology and develop a societal plan for dealing with them. This is a definition of digital literacy I can embrace wholeheartedly.
Kalrajas
Worried about the effect that ever expanding information technologies are having on global culture, our personal lives and how we interact with one another? Well, Douglas Rushkoff is (and if you're not, you either haven't been paying attention or you're too young to remember the pre-internet world). "Program or Be Programmed" offers some timely reflections on the state of what's happening to us now. Maybe future readers will look back and laugh...or maybe they'll look back and say at least someone saw it coming.

Some of Rushkoff's observations seem spot-on, while others are a bit more questionable. For example, he laments the lack of availability of computer programming classes at the high school level fearing that students are learning only how to operate the software without ever understanding the methods of its creation. That strikes me as an odd concern. One could just as easily argue that programmers are at a fundamental disadvantage lacking an understanding of the electrical engineering which makes modern microprocessors possible. That logic could be extended backward ad infinitum. (Do I need to understand Boolean logic in order to, say, build a website?)

His more astute observations deal with things like the often cited shortening of attention spans, the valuation of the recent over the relevant, the stress caused by the constant onslaught of new data (about which he says "for the first time, regular people are beginning to shows signs of stress and mental fatigue once exclusive to air traffic controllers and 911 operators"), and the separation of people from their physical surroundings ("our digital behaviors closely mirror those of Asperger's sufferers; low pick up on social cues and facial expressions, apparent lack of empathy, and the inability to make facial contact").

One of the more disturbing behaviors that omnipresent internet-enabled digital devices spawn is the attitude that a person's online representation of themselves (a sort of simulation of one's self) is more important than actually experiencing that life. This is a phenomenon in which it's more important to one's self valuation to be seen as being at all the right events, socializing with all of the right people having a better time than one's audience than it is to actually enjoy the event being experienced. We're all celebrities now (at least within our circle of digital followers).

He chronicles another familiar modern phenomenon: the mashup. Creative works that once stood as isolated and indivisible are now subject to infinite duplication, disassembly, rearrangement and publication as "new" works. Are they really new? If I rearrange the songs on your album and lay some new beats over top of it, am I an artist? Good question. It's something that the world's filmmakers will have to struggle with as their audience slices up their movie oeuvre and inserts characters from the film into a movie of their own making.

All is not lost, however. He highlights a positive trend in online communication: surfacing the truth. When statements are posted and circulated online which are inaccurate or flat out false, someone somewhere is going to see it and call out that falsehood. He says that "the way to flourish in a mediaspace biased toward nonfiction is to tell the truth." He quickly adds a caveat to that saying that "this means having a truth to tell."
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