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eBook Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Take Hold and Others Come Unstuck ePub

by Dan Heath Chip;Heath

eBook Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Take Hold and Others Come Unstuck ePub
Author: Dan Heath Chip;Heath
Language: English
ISBN: 1905211562
ISBN13: 978-1905211562
Publisher: Random House Inc (2007)
Subcategory: Self-Help
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 816
Formats: lit mbr rtf txt
ePub file: 1509 kb
Fb2 file: 1428 kb

In Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath explain why ideas stick, and provide the reader with a sticky blueprint.

In Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath explain why ideas stick, and provide the reader with a sticky blueprint. With a keen understanding of all six traits, you will be able to produce stickier ideas and subsequently revitalize the way you express yourself and transform those whom you lead with positive results. Made to Stick empowers anyone with the right insights and the right message to make any idea stick. The book proceeds linearly through the sticky blueprint: the acronym .

Why is it easier to recall some things but not others? Teachers spend hours filling students with mitosis, only for . This book focuses on the key strategies that helps shape an idea into one that can stick.

Why is it easier to recall some things but not others? Teachers spend hours filling students with mitosis, only for it to be forgotten. Likewise, a Manager unveils the new strategy only to find the next day the employees continuing with the old strategy. In many cases we are only as effective as our power of communication. It uses a mnemonic, SUCCESs Simple; Unexpected; Concrete; Credible; Emotional and Stories. Sticky’ is an idea that cuts though, gets remembered but most importantly, helps.

Chip Heath (Author) Chip Heath is a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business, teaching courses on strategy and organizations. He lives in Los Gatos, California. Библиографические данные. Made to Stick: Why some ideas take hold and others come unstuck.

This is a book about what makes some ideas more effective than others.

Chip and Dan Heath's Made to Stick shows us that if you want your message to be memorable, keep it simple, says William Leith. This is a book about what makes some ideas more effective than others. It explains what it is that makes you notice them, understand them, care about them, remember them, and act on them. And the simple answer is: presentation. Of course, substance is important, too. But the message of this smart, lively book is that if your spin is bad, you're nowhere.

Brothers Chip and Dan Heath in their New York Time’s best-selling book, Made to Stick, explore the stickiness of an idea. Those of us who spend time in the start-up world marvel at why one idea gains traction and other, seemingly better ideas, fall to wayside. The Heath brothers provide insights on this phenomenon and provide help for those bent on creating ideas that are sticky. Sticky ideas are understandable, memorable, and effective in changing thought or behavior. The six underlying SUCCESs principles for making things stick are

Mark Twain once observed, A lie can get halfway around the world. Why do some ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. Inside, the brothers Heath reveal the anatomy of ideas that stick and explain ways to make ideas stickier, such as applying the human scale principle, using the Velcro Theory of Memory, and creating curiosity gaps.

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Making ideas stick: the easy reference guide.

Wedge-drivers in World War II. Fight sticky with stickier. The Goodtimes Virus parody. How auto reliability races convinced people to sit on an explosion. Making ideas stick: the easy reference guide. A few years ago the two of us-brothers Chip and Dan-realized that both of us had been studying how ideas stick for about ten years. Our expertise came from very different fields, but we had zeroed in on the same question: Why do some ideas succeed while others fail? Dan had developed a passion for education.

Made to Stick is a study in what makes some ideas stick, while others are quickly forgotten. The Heath brothers examined some of the most famous fables, proverbs, and urban legends, and found six common elements that made these memorable

Made to Stick is a study in what makes some ideas stick, while others are quickly forgotten. The Heath brothers examined some of the most famous fables, proverbs, and urban legends, and found six common elements that made these memorable. You will learn: · That it is necessary to strip your ideas down to their core. Why you need your audience to trust you. · How to get a listener's attention, and how to reach their heart.

These are the questions that Chip Heath and Dan Heath set out to answer in their new book Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die (Random House, 2007)

These are the questions that Chip Heath and Dan Heath set out to answer in their new book Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die (Random House, 2007). What they find and relate to their readers is a handful (six, to be exact) of principles that characterize nearly all of the good ideas that stick - and whose absence plagues the ones.

What is it that makes urban myths so persistent but many everyday truths so eminently forgettable? How do newspapers set about ensuring that their headlines make you want to read on? And why do we remember complicated stories but not complicated facts? In the course of over ten years of study, Chip and Dan Heath have established what it is that determines whether particular ideas or stories stick in our minds or not, and Made to Stick is the fascinating outcome of their painstaking research. Packed full of case histories and thought-provoking anecdotes, it shows, among other things, how one Australian scientist convinced the world he'd discovered the cause of stomach ulcers by drinking a glass filled with bacteria, how a gifted sports reporter got people to watch a football match by showing them the outside of the stadium, and how high-concept pitches such as 'Jaws on a spaceship' (Alien) and 'Die Hard on a bus' (Speed) convince movie executives to invest vast sums of money in a project on the basis of almost no information. Entertaining and informative by turns, this is a fascinating and multi-faceted account of a key area of human behaviour. At the same time, by showing how we can all use such cleverly devised strategies as the 'Velcro Theory of Memory' and 'curiosity gaps', it offers superbly practical insights, setting out principles we all can adopt to make sure that we get our ideas across effectively.
Taur
Brothers Chip and Dan Heath in their New York Time’s best-selling book, “Made to Stick,” explore the stickiness of an idea. Those of us who spend time in the start-up world marvel at why one idea gains traction and other, seemingly better ideas, fall to wayside. The Heath brothers provide insights on this phenomenon and provide help for those bent on creating ideas that are “sticky.”

“Sticky” ideas are understandable, memorable, and effective in changing thought or behavior. The six underlying SUCCESs principles for making things “stick” are:

• Simplicity – Simple=core+compact. Find and share your core idea; make it simple and profound. “It’s the economy, stupid” (Clinton campaign, 1992) is a great example. The inverted pyramid approach which is used in journalism is a good tool to get your headline.
• Unexpectedness - We need to violate people’s expectations to get them to pay attention. Break existing patterns to get people’s attention. Southwest flight attendants use humor (there are two doors on either side if you need to jump!) to hold attention when giving the pre-flight safety announcement. Humans adapt incredibly quickly to patterns. Consistent sensory stimulation makes us tune out.
• Concreteness – You must help people understand and remember. Don’t use abstractions. Make your core idea concrete. Use common knowledge to make your idea stick. Our greatest villain is the Curse of Knowledge or when we assume everyone knows what we know or shares our unique perspective. We have to see it from the “others” point of view. We forget what other people do not know and slip into “abstractspeak.” Boeing’s criteria for a new plane was not “the best passenger plane in the world” but one that can seat 131 passengers and land on Runway 2-22 at LaGuardia. No ambiguity here.
• Credibility – Help people believe by making sure your idea carries its own credentials. Pass the “Sinatra Test.” Examples offered include “Where’s the Beef?” and Reagan’s “Are you better off today?” Both were credible and resonated as they were based on common shared knowledge.
• Emotional– Make people care by using the power of association, appealing to self-interest, or identity. “People donate to Rokia more than a wide swath of Africa”; “Honoring the Game” versus the use of the word ‘sportsmanship’; “I’m in charge of morale” as stated by a US military cook in Iraq. We must make people feel something to get them to care. We are wired to feel things, not abstractions.
• Stories – Stories get people to act on our ideas. Stories act as a kind of mental flight simulator, preparing us to respond more quickly and effectively. Stories are told and retold because they contain wisdom. The Healths provide what they view are the three basic story plots – the Challenge Plot, The Connection Plot, and the Creativity Plot. Stories can almost single-handedly defeat “The Curse of Knowledge.” I have been involved in a ministry for people in career-transition for over fifteen years. We consistently advise those in-transitions to create stories to highlight their skills and experience when interviewing. It is well understood that interviewers will mostly remember your comportment and more importantly, your stories.

A chapter is devoted to each principle with the authors providing context for clarity and understanding, examples, and tools to guide the development of a “sticky” idea.

The Curse of Knowledge is what escapes most when trying to pitch an idea. It is the natural psychological tendency that consistently gets in the way of our ability to successfully create “sticky ideas” using these principles. Once we know something, we find it hard to imagine what it was like not to know. This knowledge has “cursed” us and makes it difficult to share our knowledge with others. It is because we cannot readily re-create our listeners state of mind. When a CEO discusses “unlocking shareholder value,” there is a tune playing in his head that the employees can’t hear. On the other hand, President John F. Kennedy knew that opaque, abstract missions don’t captivate and inspire people so he concretely challenged the country with “landing on the moon by the end of the decade.”

Throughout the book, the authors present “Idea Clinics” which illustrate how an idea can be made stickier. Example: ”Do smokers really need to understand the workings of the lungs in order to appreciate the dangers of smoking?”

The book itself is “sticky’ filled with stories of normal people facing normal problems who did an amazing thing simply by applying these principles, even if they were not aware that they were doing this. They distinguish themselves by crafting ideas that made a difference.

Do your ideas gain traction and “Stick” or are they cast aside for less important ideas? “Made to Stick” was written for you.
Simple
Some ideas are very “sticky” meaning they are lasting, generative, and convey an important message. A classic example is: “Do onto others as you would have them do onto you.” In Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath explain why ideas stick, and provide the reader with a “sticky blueprint.”

Essentially, sticky ideas are never a matter of happenstance, but all share six common traits. With a keen understanding of all six traits, you will be able to produce stickier ideas and subsequently revitalize the way you express yourself and transform those whom you lead with positive results.
Made to Stick empowers anyone with the right insights and the right message to make any idea “stick.”

The book proceeds linearly through the sticky blueprint: the acronym S.U.C.C.E.S. Hence, in order to make an idea sticky it has to be simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and tell a story. The peculiars of each trait are explored in comprehensive detail within each chapter. Generally speaking even though this book is 250+ pages, it is a very quick read.

Made to Stick is one of three books written on transformative change by the Heath brothers. The other two books are Switch: How to change things when change is hard and Decisive: How to make better choices in life and work. There are many areas of cross-over between the three selections, and I have derived the most value from each book after considering it in context of all three. Hence, Made to Stick helps you to start your journey with a bold idea that anyone can latch onto. Switch reveals how to materialize that idea into tough environments. Finally, Decisive equips you with the tools to navigate fuzzy terrain in the midst of your path to something revolutionary.
Dagdage
I love almost all business and marketing books - I inhale them in a few days.

I can’t read this book for more than 10 minutes at a time. It actually makes me angry how boring it is.

One chapter per letter of SUCCES (intentional).

Each chapter is drawn out like no other.

The basic premise is revealed, then come in some random stories loosely based on studies.

It’s really a terrible book.

The idea is cool, will look for a summary.
Beazerdred
I hate reading. I had to read this book for a sales class I'm taking and it is actually very interesting and easy to read! It was enjoyable, kept me reading on and I was learning with every chapter! It very well lays out how to create interest and make concrete images that "stick" with your customer. It was extremely easy for me to think of my own ideas after reading this book. I wowed my instructor in my class with my ideas. Defiantly recommend even if you hate reading, this one is a very easy read. I even highlighted certain things and I would go back and look at it or read it again.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
I enjoyed the book, but even though the ideas were useful, it was pretty much common sense stuff. Maybe it was just an unrealistic expectation on my part, but I did expect more- more in the way of insights, more specific tips about how to craft compelling headlines to get someone to read your content- and what was presented was mostly very general, and not really completely on target. I did still find it useful, because there were things that I had not thought of, even if it was all much less specific than I had hoped. There wasn't anything truly outstanding. I guess you can only invent the wheel once in a great while. It did have some good points in it, but somehow, I felt that I had been led to believe that there was so much more substance to it. It was kind of like being sold on a trip to Everest, and finding yourself at Mt. Washington. If you had been sold a trip to the White Mountains, Mt. Washington would have been quite a spectacle; when you're expecting Everest, Mt. Washington is a mere bump. I feel much better served when the ad copy under-promises, and then over-delivers. That about sums it up.
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