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eBook Identity and Ritual in a Japanese Diving Village: The Making and Becoming of Person and Place ePub

by D. P. Martinez

eBook Identity and Ritual in a Japanese Diving Village: The Making and Becoming of Person and Place ePub
Author: D. P. Martinez
Language: English
ISBN: 0824826701
ISBN13: 978-0824826703
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (April 30, 2004)
Pages: 264
Category: Anthropology
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 952
Formats: azw lit mbr lrf
ePub file: 1590 kb
Fb2 file: 1997 kb

Through her detailed description of a particular place (Kuzaki-cho) at a particular moment in time (the 1980s)

Through her detailed description of a particular place (Kuzaki-cho) at a particular moment in time (the 1980s). D. P. Martinez teaches at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and has published on tourism, the mass media, Japanese divers, women and religion, and ethnicity. Paperback: 264 pages. Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (April 30, 2004).

Start by marking Identity And Ritual In A Japanese Diving Village . In the 1980s it was one of the few villages where female divers (ama) still collected abalone and other shellfish and where some of its inhabitants continued to make a living as fishermen

Start by marking Identity And Ritual In A Japanese Diving Village: The Making And Becoming Of Person And Place as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In the 1980s it was one of the few villages where female divers (ama) still collected abalone and other shellfish and where some of its inhabitants continued to make a living as fishermen. Kuzaki was also a kambe, or sacred guild, of Ise Shrine, the most important Shinto shrine in modern Japan-home to Amaterasu, the sun goddess. Kuzaki's rituals affirmed a national identity in an era when attitudes to modernity and Japaneseness were being challenged by globalization.

Kuzaki's rituals affirmed a national identity inan era when attitudes to modernity and Japaneseness were being challenged by globalization. Making Place and Identity. 49. Dokyusei the Kumiai and the Nifune Festival. Martinez enhances her fascinating ethnographic description of a single diving village with a critique of the way in which the anthropology of Japan has developed.

CHAPTER 3 Kuzaki: Making Place and Identity.

Book Description: Through her detailed description of a particular place (Kuzaki-cho) at a particular moment in time (the 1980s), D. Martinez addresses a variety of issues currently at the fore in the anthropology of Japan: the construction of identity, both for a place and its people; the importance of ritual in a country that describes itself as nonreligious; and th. CHAPTER 3 Kuzaki: Making Place and Identity.

Through her detailed description of a particular place (Kazaki-cho) at a particular moment in time (the 1980s), D. Martinez addresses a variety of issues currently at the fore in the anthropology of Japan: the construction of identity, both for a place and its people; the importance of ritual in a country that describes itself as nonreligious; and the. Relationship between men and women in a society where gender divisions are still very much in place. Kuzaki is, for the anthropologist, both a microcosm of modernity and an attempt to bring the past into the present

The Japanese ukiyo-e artist Kitagawa Utamaro made a number of prints .

The Japanese ukiyo-e artist Kitagawa Utamaro made a number of prints depicting ama divers-women whose work is to dive for shellfish or pearls-catching haliotis abalone sea snails. Amongst the prints are the first print in the erotic book Utamakura (1788); two triptychs called Awabi-tori (鮑取り, "Abalone divers"), one from c. 1788–90 and the other from c. 1797–98; and the hexaptych Enoshima Yūryō Awabi-tori no Zu (江之嶋遊りょうあわびとりの図, "Abalone. divers hunting in Enoshima") of c. 1804–06. Identity and Ritual in a Japanese Diving Village: The Making and Becoming of Person and Place. University of Hawaii Press.

Identity and Ritual in a Japanese Diving Village: The Making and Becoming of Person and Place (revie. January 2005 · Monumenta Nipponica. Translating "My Place" into japanese: theory and practice in linguistic and cultural contexts. Identity and Ritual in a Japanese Diving Village: The Making and Becoming of Person and Place Japanese dictionaries.

Identity and Ritual in a Japanese Diving Village: The Making and Becoming of Person and Place. Ritual Participation and Social Support in a Major Japanese Festival. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. McGuire, William . and Alice Padawer-Singer. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 46(2): 185–200. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Through her detailed description of a particular place (Kuzaki-cho) at a particular moment in time (the 1980s), D. P. Martinez addresses a variety of issues currently at the fore in the anthropology of Japan: the construction of identity, both for a place and its people; the importance of ritual in a country that describes itself as nonreligious; and the relationship between men and women in a society where gender divisions are still very much in place. Kuzaki is, for the anthropologist, both a microcosm of modernity and an attempt to bring the past into the present. But it must also be understood as a place all of its own. In the 1980s it was one of the few villages where female divers (ama) still collected abalone and other shellfish and where some of its inhabitants continued to make a living as fishermen. Kuzaki was also a kambe, or sacred guild, of Ise Shrine, the most important Shinto shrine in modern Japan―home to Amaterasu, the sun goddess. Kuzaki’s rituals affirmed a national identity in an era when attitudes to modernity and Japaneseness were being challenged by globalization.

Martinez enhances her fascinating ethnographic description of a single diving village with a critique of the way in which the anthropology of Japan has developed. The result is a sophisticated investigation by a senior scholar of Japanese studies that, while firmly grounded in empirical data, calls on anthropological theory to construct another means of understanding Japan―both as a society in which the collective is important and as a place where individual ambitions and desires can be expressed.

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