lind-peinture
» » Creative Destruction: From built-to-last to built to perform (Financial Times Series)

eBook Creative Destruction: From built-to-last to built to perform (Financial Times Series) ePub

by Richard Foster,Pierre Ven Beneden,Sarah Kaplan

eBook Creative Destruction: From built-to-last to built to perform (Financial Times Series) ePub
Author: Richard Foster,Pierre Ven Beneden,Sarah Kaplan
Language: English
ISBN: 0273656384
ISBN13: 978-0273656388
Publisher: Financial Times Prentice Hall (August 20, 2001)
Pages: 384
Category: Philosophy
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 220
Formats: mbr lrf azw lrf
ePub file: 1788 kb
Fb2 file: 1617 kb

Creative Destruction is a phenomenal book The book seems to take explicit aim at Collin's book & to Last', saying . Old-time rates of change were much slower and seemed to give credence to pure branding and operations quality over innovation.

Creative Destruction is a phenomenal book. It reveals what it takes for an enterprise to thrive in the age of discontinuities yet meet the pressures of continuous performance.

Richard Foster, Pierre Ven Beneden, Sarah Kaplan. Place of Publication. Save on Non-Fiction Books. Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days. SARAH KAPLAN was an Innovation Specialist at McKinsey & Company Consulting for more than a decade with firms around the world in industries as diverse as pharmaceuticals, medical devices, airlines and consumer products on issues of growth and renewal. from Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Save on Non-Fiction Books.

This is creative destruction. Turning Built-to-Last into Built-to-Perform. He lives in New York City with his wife and three sons

This is creative destruction. Read full description. See details and exclusions. Sold bycolinh245 (1176)100. 0% positive FeedbackContact seller. He lives in New York City with his wife and three sons. SARAH KAPLAN was an Innovation Specialist at McKinsey & CompanyConsulting for more than a decade with firms around the world in industries as diverse as pharmaceuticals, medical devices, airlines and consumer products on issues of growth and renewal.

Creative Destruction will reverberate in corporate boardrooms for some time to come, changing the basic premises of corporate success. Antony Burgmans, Chairman, Unilever NV "Creative Destruction is a phenomenal book.

Are you sure you want to remove Creative destruction from your list? Creative destruction. from 'built to last' to 'built to perform'. by Richard N. Foster, Richard Foster, Pierre Ven Beneden, Sarah Kaplan. Published 2001 by Financial Times Prentice Hall in London.

Find nearly any book by Pierre Ven Beneden. by Richard Foster, Pierre Ven Beneden, Sarah Kaplan

Find nearly any book by Pierre Ven Beneden. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Richard Foster, Pierre Ven Beneden, Sarah Kaplan. ISBN 9780273656388 (978-0-273-65638-8) Hardcover, Pearson Education Ltd, 2001. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. com has become a leading book price comparison site

Foster, Richard and Sarah Kaplan, (2001), " Creative Destruction from Built-to-Last to Built to Perform, " Financial Times Prentice Hall, Aug. Jan 2007.

Foster, Richard and Sarah Kaplan, (2001), " Creative Destruction from Built-to-Last to Built to Perform, " Financial Times Prentice Hall, Aug. Ramon Casadesus-Masanell. What is to be done? Must corporations' thirst for growth and profits serve only to exacerbate the antiglobalization movement? On the contrary, the authors say, a solution to this dilemma does exist.

Creative Destruction book. Surviving isn't enough  . Start by marking Creative Destruction: From Built-To-Last to Built to Perform as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. According to Foster and Kaplan it is no longer the objective of a corporation to effectively and efficiently manufacture a tangible product. The objective is to spin off, merge and acquire, and constantly reinvent and restructure for the objective of beating the market. In other works trade off consistency in the tangible for wild fluctuations in the intangible.

Creative Destruction will reverberate in corporate boardrooms for some time to come, changing the basic . Creative Destruction is a phenomenal book.

Richard Foster, a McKinsey director from 1982 to 2004, is a coauthor of Creative Destruction: Why Companies That Are Built to Last Underperform the Market-and How to Successfully Transform Them.

* * * Harvard Business Review - Top 10 Book of 2001 * * * It is well known that if you compare a list of the top 500 companies 50 years ago with a list of today's top performers, there will be very few names that appear on both lists. Those companies that have stood the test of time are held up as paragons of corporate performance - blue-chip businesses that are "built to last". What is less well known, however, is that companies that are built to last are also built to under-perform. Excellent new research by the authors of Creative Destruction shows that very few companies are able to deliver above-average shareholder returns over the long term. General Electric and Johnson & Johnson are the only companies to beat the market average over the long term and then only by a small amount. Why? It's the trade off between control and creativity. The very things that have enabled these companies to perform so dependably - their control processes, their commitment to steady incremental improvement - are the very things that deaden their ability to change and innovate. Doing what you do well might be enough to survive but it's not enough to excel for investors. To excel for your investors you must constantly evolve, innovate, change - destroy and create. Change, Innovation, Creativity - heard it all before? Well, apart from proving that this is more than just hype by analyzing the last 36 years' worth of corporate performance data, Foster and Kaplan actually tell you how to do it. How to deal with the corporate mindset and emotional attachments that stand in the way of change, how to find the balance between control and creativity, and how to control the pace and scale of change. Incremental improvement eventually hits a brick wall. Creative destruction is the way through. "A thoroughly researched, masterfully written, and somewhat frightening explanation of how competitive advantage is built and inevitably erodes. Anyone who is interested in staying ahead of the competition should read this book. It's good."Clayton Christensen, Associate Professor, Harvard Business School and author of The Innovator's Dilemma "(Offers) invaluable insight into business building and dealing with the challenge of dynamic growth. Foster and Kaplan, get right to the heart of one of today's central themes...An instructive and insightful guide for managers to navigate...the twenty-first century."Jorma Ollila, Chairman and CEO, Nokia Corporation "It was clear the game had changed, but until this book it was never clear by how much. Creative Destruction will reverberate in corporate boardrooms for some time to come, changing the basic premises of corporate success. There is no doubt that, in order to survive in the future, inspiration can be found in Foster and Kaplan's book."Antony Burgmans, Chairman, Unilever NV "Creative Destruction is a phenomenal book. It reveals what it takes for an enterprise to thrive in the age of discontinuities yet meet the pressures of continuous performance. Wise, sweeping, balanced, grounded in facts and yet highly imaginative, it is unquestionably the best business book I have ever read...Countless numbers of CEO's will wish they could have read it sooner...and so will their shareholders."John Seely Brown, President, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center "Creative Destruction has clarified for me the challenges of sustaining business success. It is the freshest view of the challenges before us that I have seen. It also shows where we have to change to be successful...Compelling." Vernon Jordon, Lazard Freres "Creative Destruction is a sharp stick in the eye for corporate conventional wisdom and orthodoxy. Foster and Kaplan have captured the essence of market-driven counterinitiative thinking. A wake up call for CEOs and investment strategists!" Joe L Roby, Chairman, Credit Suisse First Boston Corporation "A skilled dissection of organisational inertia... In a fast-moving business world, Foster and Kaplan's ideas make a lot of sense." New York Times "It's a fascinating book" Catherine Wheatley, Sunday Business "This is a provocative and timely book." Harvard Business Review
Androwyn
Foster's previous work - Innovation, the Attackers Advantage, is a masterpiece, and this follow up is an excellent read. An interesting observation at the start contrasts a company trying to excel and innovate, and the market as a Darwinian force, ruthlessly selecting the `best' irregardless of past performance. The message is the same, stark reminder as Clayton Christensen's - past excellence is no guarantee of future survival.
Having delivered this baleful message, the book distinguishes between typical management techniques - measurement, control, which leads to operational excellence [called convergent thinking], and the type of observation, reflection and debate [called divergent thinking] which may lead to innovation.
The book outlines methodologies which can be used to attempt to combine both convergent and divergent approaches within a firm. The book therefore takes one step further than Clayton Christensen's suggestion of setting up a separate entity to pursue a specific `blue sky' set of ideas. However it in no way underplays the seriousness of the threat of new product or new product cycles to the incumbent, successful corporations - indeed some of the examples given in the book as successes (Cisco, Corning) have since gone through major traumas in subsequent product and economic cycles.
The book seems to take explicit aim at Collin's book `Built to Last', saying that companies which have been longest in the Fortune 500 have underperformed the market - and expands this theme that the market, by having no emotional link to firms, will pick winners and punish the slow remorselessly. From an investors point of view, my interpretation of Foster's guidance would be to periodically pick the top performers in an index and sell those which don't make it to the top, regardless of past position; my interpretation of Collins is that eventually the tried and trusted firms win out.
I think my money would be on Foster.
However in terms of management thinking Foster is definitely in the Thomas Kuhn, Giovanni Dosi, Clayton Christensen, Geoffrey Moore tradition of the intense difficulty of managing to be customer focused, operationally excellent and innovative simultaneously.
Barit
Good book
Uleran
school book
Lesesshe
Bought this book for a class, never read it but Im sure it was life changing. Oh and it was cheap.
snowball
The authors score a direct hit on those - investors and managers alike - looking for the continuous, corporate value creator. It simply does not exist.
There is no question that there is a direct link between innovation and wealth creation. Using a proprietary database developed by McKinsey & Company to study the life cycle of American corporations, the authors demonstrate, what they term as "the corporate equivalent of El Dorado," the company that continually outperforms the stock market does not exist. It is a figment of the "one decision" crowd that resurfaces with each generation of investors.
Capital Markets reward shareholders of competitive corporations and then rapidly, and with no remorse, forget them when they lose their ability to innovate. The McKinsey data show corporations, which operate with management philosophies based on the assumption of continuity, do not change at the pace and scale of the markets. Therefore, in the long run they fail to create value at the pace and scale of the markets.
Corporations are premised on continuity; their focus is on operations. Capital Markets are premised on discontinuity; their focus is on creation and destruction. They are less tolerant than the corporation of underperformance. "Blue Chip" corporations earn the right to survive. They have no claim on superior, or for that matter, even average long-term shareholder returns.
The reason is simple, the authors conclude. Corporate control processes, the very processes that ensure long-term survival, inure them to the need for change.
This is a book every serious investor should read. The message is spiced with case studies of how corporations like Johnson and Johnson, Enron, Corning and GE transform daily themselves rather than opt to incrementally improve operations. Managements need to create new businesses, abandon ingrown rules and structures and be continually adopting new decision-making processes, control systems and mental models.
As the book's subtitle suggests, corporations must strive to be as dynamic and responsive as the capital markets if they are to reward investors with long-term superior returns.
Lavivan
This is an unbelievably well-written delineation of the state of captialistic economy. 'Creative Destruction' refers to the force behind the expanding capitalistic empire. It is a phrase coined by Joseph Schumpter in the 30's. Business leaders of today that get caught in cultural lock-in will fail tomorrow. A business needs to transform and re-evaluate itself against the currents of the constantly changing market, or fall as prey to those that do. Old-time rates of change were much slower and seemed to give credence to pure branding and operations quality over innovation. However a closer look will reveal that these companies averaged only a sixty year lifespan. Modern companies on the S&P 500 are only averaging a ten year lifespan due to the accelerating rates of change. This is an age of discontinuity. There is no longevity to the conservatism of yesterday.

This book explores the ways of creative thinking... how to foster it... and what fear mechanisms destroy it in the upper levels of corporations. It gives ideas on how to evaluate affiliations and acquisitions.

On a humorus note, Enron is cited as an example of success based on this approach. They are quoted 'we hire smart people and pay them more than they think they are worth.' and there are 'no punishments for trying (risking).' Seems like it is always best to be careful who you let guard the cookie jar.

Truly a great read by the highly respected Senior Partner and Director of McKinsey & Co.

Five Super Stars
lind-peinture.fr
© All right reserved. 2017-2020
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
eBooks are provided for reference only