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eBook The Examined Life: Philosophical Meditations ePub

by Robert Nozick

eBook The Examined Life: Philosophical Meditations ePub
Author: Robert Nozick
Language: English
ISBN: 0671725017
ISBN13: 978-0671725013
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; (6th) edition (December 15, 1990)
Pages: 308
Category: Philosophy
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 607
Formats: doc lit mobi mbr
ePub file: 1921 kb
Fb2 file: 1130 kb

Professor Nozick helps setting up philosophical life questions in a tidy, professional manner in. .

Professor Nozick helps setting up philosophical life questions in a tidy, professional manner in the vein of a XX century Socrates. May not always agree with his positions - and he is not trying to convert - but overall a very insightful book that makes one think. Here's what Nozicks writes in chapter 25, near the end, of The Examined Life: "The libertarian position I once propounded now seems to me seriously inadequate, in part because it did not fully knit the humane considerations and joint cooperative activities it left roon for more closely into its fabric.

The book drew a number of critical reactions. The book is an attempt to "tackle human nature, the personal, 'the holiness of everyday life' and its meaning. Nozick expresses his concerns with libertarianism and proposes some form of inheritance taxation. Denis Donoghue praised The Examined Life in The Wilson Quarterly, but stated that it had some passages that were less strong than others

Nozick's second book, Philosophical Explanations, was given the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award of Phi Beta Kappa in 1982.

Nozick's second book, Philosophical Explanations, was given the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award of Phi Beta Kappa in 1982. It covers a wide range of basic philosophical topics: the question why there is something rather than nothing, the identity of the self, knowledge and skepticism, free will, the foundation of ethnics, and the meaning of life. Nozick abandons philosophical proof or argumentation as too coercive and opts instead for methods of explanation that promote understanding. This approach has culminated in his third book, The Examined Life. Библиографические данные.

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The Examined Life is the first I've read from Robert Nozick.

book by Robert Nozick. The Examined Life is the first I've read from Robert Nozick. If nothing more than a "self-help book," it's one of the best of that genre.

Includes bibliographical references and index of names.

Nozick here offers an illuminating discussion of such topics as death, sexuality, and friendship-concerns that everyone has but that have not often been discussed by analytic philosophers, among whom. Robert Nozick (1938-2002) is the author of Anarchy, State, and Utopia, which won a National Book Award in 1975, Philosophical Explanations, which received the Ralph Waldo Emerson Award, Phi Beta Kappa in 1982, and The Examined Life. He was the Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University. Bibliographic information.

Baptiste Le Bihan - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (2):419-438. Expertise and the Fragmentation of Intellectual Autonomy. C. Thi Nguyen - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiries 6 (2):107-124. Hedonism Reconsidered. Bennett Helm - 2008 - Noûs 42 (1):17–49. Similar books and articles.

An original work from a preeminent professor of philosophy at Harvard University, in which happiness, dying, creativity, religious faith, sexuality, good and evil, the ideal and the real, are explored in the grand Socratic tradition. Now in paperback, this bestseller will appeal to anyone concerned with inner transformation and personal growth.

One of this century’s most original philosophical thinkers, Nozick brilliantly renews Socrates’s quest to uncover the life that is worth living. In brave and moving meditations on love, creativity, happiness, sexuality, parents and children, the Holocaust, religious faith, politics, and wisdom, The Examined Life brings philosophy back to its preeminent subject, the things that matter most. We join in Nozick’s reflections, weighing our experiences and judgments alongside those of past thinkers, to embark upon our own voyages of understanding and change.
caif
Definitely not the usual self help book that proliferates on new age bookstores shelves, so if this is what you are looking for, one will be better served elsewhere. Professor Nozick helps setting up philosophical life questions in a tidy, professional manner in the vein of a XX century Socrates. May not always agree with his positions - and he is not trying to convert - but overall a very insightful book that makes one think. The first edition was published in 1989 but it reads like it could have been written last year - whished I read it a long time ago.
Braswyn
He writes exceptionally well, but this book isn't as philosophically rigorous as Philosophical Explanations (his best book) or Anarchy, State and Utopia. This book is his witty and wise reflections on his examined life, and those are the reflections of an extraordinarily intelligent person. They are well worth reading. John Searle's recent book, Mind, Language and Society: Philosophy in the Real World, is much more rigorous and, from that standpoint, much more philosophically interesting, but it isn't as "personal". But both should be read by thoughtful people.
Nern
Book of a lifetime. Awesome. Fear of death section is life lesson!
Gietadia
A worthwhile read but life does not need to be this complicated.
It is a worthwhile read but digest it as if you are eating an elephant; a chapter at a time
Hiclerlsi
As expected.
Dancing Lion
I received this book in new quality. It is exactly as they show it! Very good book for my college. Exactly as I needed it.
Delaath
Robert Nozick's first book, "Anarchy, State, and Utopia", has been widely touted as the philosophical bible of libertarianism in America, the most rigorous case ever argued against redistributive justice and the welfare state, the Summa of anarcho-capitalism. Here's what Nozicks writes in chapter 25, near the end, of The Examined Life:
"The libertarian position I once propounded now seems to me seriously inadequate, in part because it did not fully knit the humane considerations and joint cooperative activities it left roon for more closely into its fabric. It neglected the symbolic importance of an official political concern with issues or problems, as a way of marking their importance or urgency, and hence of expressing, channeling, intensifying, encouraging, and validating our private actions and concerns toward them.... There are some things we choose to do together through government in solemn marking of our human solidarity..." John Donne, of course, said something similar: No man is an island entire unto himself.

The Examined Life is a book of homilies - sermons - expressing the earned wisdom of a lifetime of philosophy. I'm not a devoted sermon reader, and I can't profess to find this book fun to read, but it is full of simply-expressed clear thinking. Perhaps a chapter a week - there are twenty-six - on Sundays would be serviceable. Nozick's goal, I think, is to sketch out a kind of secular morality or ethics, not based on religious myth but rather on shared humanity and empathy.

Chapter 20, entitled The Holocaust, impresses me as the most fearsomely cogent declaration of the fallen state of human progress that I've ever read: "I believe the Holocaust is an event like the Fall in the way traditional Christianity conceived it, something that radically and drastically alters the situation and stautus of humanity." Nozick declares taht he is not a Christian, and continues: "It now would not be a special tragedy if humankind ended... I do not mean that humanity deserves this to happen... but now that history and that species have become stained, its loss would now be no special loss above and beyond the losses to the individuals involved. Humnaity has lost its claim to continue." In relation to Christian eschatology, Nozick declares that humanity has desanctified itself. "There still remain the ethical teachings and the example of the life of Jesus before his end, but there no longer operates the saving message of Christ. In this sense, the Christian era has closed."
A few pages later, Nozick offers this: "Perhaps it is only by suffering ourselves when any suffering is inflicted, or even when any is felt, that we can redeem the species. Before, perhaps, we could be more isolated; now that no longer suffices.... If the Christian era has ended, it has been replaced by one in which we each now have to take humaity's suffering upon ourselves. What Jesus was supposed to have done for us, before the Holocaust, humanity must now do for itself."

It's not so rare to find a philosopher repudiating his earlier opinions, and perhaps more than once. To find Robert Nozick, however, repudiating his Ayn Rand hyper-individualism, meretricious free-market economic dogma, and opposition to social justice through government, is unusually satisfying. Here's a beaker of health to you, Professor Nozick! Live long and thrive!
happy with the book i got it was in the right condition and will use for my college studies. thank you for this book.
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