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eBook Civil-Military Relations in Turkey: An Analysis of Civilian Leaders: Incentive Structures, Political Capacity and Institutional Context ePub

by Müge Aknur

eBook Civil-Military Relations in Turkey:  An Analysis of Civilian Leaders: Incentive Structures, Political Capacity and Institutional Context ePub
Author: Müge Aknur
Language: English
ISBN: 3639056361
ISBN13: 978-3639056365
Publisher: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller (October 24, 2013)
Pages: 228
Category: Politics & Government
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 732
Formats: azw mbr mobi docx
ePub file: 1694 kb
Fb2 file: 1789 kb

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This article analyzes Turkish civil-military relations with the help of two .

This CMI Working Paper presents an analysis of civilian-military relations in Turkey, casting light on institutional .

This CMI Working Paper presents an analysis of civilian-military relations in Turkey, casting light on institutional, legal and economic aspects that have shaped the military’s role in society. An assessment of contemporary civilian-military relations in Turkey needs to be informed by a historical background. Civilian-military relations have been considered in the context of the failed coup attempt of July 2015 in which the government aimed at absolute control over the armed forces and the military lost all of its major privileges.

Civil–military relations (Civ-Mil or CMR) describes the relationship between civil society as a whole and the military organization or organizations established to protect it. CMR incorporates a diverse, often normative field, which moves within and across management, social science and policy scales. More narrowly, it describes the relationship between the civil authority of a given society and its military authority.

Civil-Military Relations Civil-Military Relations 83 Democratization in. .Bringing king under effective civilian control is not a simple task.

Civil-Military Relations Civil-Military Relations 83 Democratization in Indonesia An Assessment 84 Civil-Military Relations Civil-Military Relations 1. Background Civilian authority over the armed forces is a cornerstone of democratic politics. A necessary if not sufficient way of measuring the progress of Indonesia’s democratization is to assess whether the Indonesian armed forces are under civilian authority. The palace was also very effective in weakening the institutional power of the TNI by splitting the officer corps along confessional lines.

civil-military relations in each country (Part Three of Chapters Two and Three). should not confuse discipline and organizational capacity. relations on the political objectives of the action taken by the officers. A summary of all previous evaluations appears in the last pages of this report.

Civil–military relations in Afghanistan Civilian leadership would decide the objective of any military action but then.

Civil–military relations in Afghanistan. is a central component of western involvement' and that this has been 'highly contentious among aid agencies, perhaps nowhere more so than Afghanistan. Aid agencies need to invest more in capacity and training for engaging in civil–military dialogue and, together with donors, seek to generate more objective evidence on the impact of stabilisation approaches. Professional organization and journal.

civilian control in the political and social contexts of Turkey and Brazil .

The study compares and contrasts the evolution of civil-military relations from an interventionist military to increased civilian control in the political and social contexts of Turkey and Brazil. The study compares and contrasts the evolution of civil-military relations from an interventionist military to increased civilian control in the political and social contexts of Turkey and Brazil.

Civil–military relations discussions of militarism – in which . Within the context of modern nationalism, someone who is willing to die for one's country has a claim on recognition as a full citizen of that country.

Civil–military relations discussions of militarism – in which militarism occurs when the ‘balance’ tilts too far in favor of the military – are thus limited by a conceptual separation between military and society that obscures the grounding of military power in social relations. The civil–military relations and MIC approaches are both useful ways in two particular aspects of militarism – the institutional and the political-economic.

The analysis of discursive practices enables us to get a deep understanding of single cases and the characteristics of their particular political context. Beeson, M. (2008) ‘Civil-military relations in Indonesia and the Philippines: Will the Thai coup prove contagious?’ Armed Forces & Society 34 (3): 474–490. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Culler, J. (1976) ‘Presupposition and intertextuality’, MLN 91 (6): 1380–1396. (1983) On Deconstruction: Theory and Criticism after Structuralism, London: Routledge.

This research seeks to contribute to our understanding of the role played by civilian leaders in the consolidation of democracy examining changes in levels of military influence over politics in Turkey. It departs from typical military-centric civil-military relations literature by employing a civilian-centric analysis. It adopts a framework that focuses on the incentive structure of civilian leaders as determined by competitive elections; the political capacity of leaders as reflected in their parliamentary majority, political experience and the effectiveness of their economic policies; and institutional rules, such as the system of government and organization of the parties. The study argues that, depending on their incentive structure and political capacity, the civilian leaders will either challenge a politically powerful military or ally with that military by adopting its preference structures. The relevance of this model for understanding civil-military relations in the aftermath of the transition to democracy in mid-1980s is explored in the Turkish case by examining the periods of Prime Minister/President Turgut Özal and Prime Minister Tansu Çiller.
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