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eBook Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary: Reflections by Women Writers ePub

by Susan Morrison

eBook Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary: Reflections by Women Writers ePub
Author: Susan Morrison
Language: English
ISBN: 0061455938
ISBN13: 978-0061455933
Publisher: Harper (January 22, 2008)
Pages: 272
Category: Politics & Government
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 548
Formats: docx doc lit mbr
ePub file: 1131 kb
Fb2 file: 1847 kb

The very women that wrote the essays seem to When this book was titled it was no joke

Nov 08, 2016 Paul Bryant marked it as probably-never. From Susan Lehman, an exploration of how Hillary's origins in corporate law may have formed the basis of her public persona: Neither Hillary Clinton nor the average corporate law partner is likely to make anyone's blood jump or their heart sing. The very women that wrote the essays seem to When this book was titled it was no joke. All the authors seem to do is write about the aestetics of Hillary Clinton. Sadly it reads like a bunch of catty women talking over some international coffee.

Several writers have written about Hillary Clinton before and stand by their controversial opinions such as. .You may not come to any new conclusions about Clinton, but Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary will give you some original angles on a very provocative subject.

Several writers have written about Hillary Clinton before and stand by their controversial opinions such as Robin Givhan on Clinton's cleavage.

First Chapters First Chapter. 30 Ways of Looking at Hillary'. And although she is probably the most famous woman in the world right now, Hillary Clinton has a lot of people stumped. It could be that we think we should know her well already, having watched her and her husband for eight years in the White House (and having learned more about their marriage than we had a right to, thanks to Kenneth Starr). Or it could be that, because she is a woman, we have different expectations of her and how cozy we ought to feel with her.

This pointillistic portrait paints a composite picture of Hillary Clinton, focusing on details from the personal to the political, from the hard-hitting to the whimsical, to give a well-balanced and unbiased view of the woman who may be our first Madam President.

Morrison, Susan (e. Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary: Reflections by Women Writers. Strong Frontrunner, Weak Woman: Hillary Rodham Clinton and the Politics of Pile On" in Clarke Rountree, ed. Venomous Speech: Problems with American Political Discourse on the Right and Left, Vol. 2, pp. 223–236.

Reflections by Women Writers. Your purchase helps support NPR programming. An evaluation of the presidential candidate by thirty women writers from diverse walks of life considers her political career and prospects from supportive and less favorable perspectives, in a volume that includes contributions by such names as Deborah Tannen, Susan Cheever, and Lorrie Moore. 35,000 first printing. Read an excerpt of this book.

Women Writers Reflect on the Candidate and What Her Campaign Meant. amp; International Retailers. Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary.

The 24/7 replaying of that moment on cable television also reminds us how relentlessly Mrs. Clinton has been . Clinton has been dissected, deconstructed and decoded over the years: by now her marriage, her hair, her pantsuits, her voice and her laugh have been more minutely anatomized than her voting record on Iraq, her (mis-)handling of health care during her husband’s administration. or her stands on Iran, Social Security and immigration

Call it the Case of the Cleavage that Consumed the Senate. Cleavagegate is one of the few pointed debates in Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary, a book that suffers for its predominantly homogenized view of the first viable female candidate for the nation's highest office. The collection is a brisk read and undeniably well-written, but it's more of a guilty pleasure than a serious debate on the subject's suitability to be president. Thirty Ways is also something of a misnomer.

A little-known fact about Hillary Clinton: She had great eyebrows in high school. Well groomed, nice arch, a little thick, which is actually back in fashion today.

No other politician inspires such a wide range of passionate feelings as Hillary Rodham Clinton. As America's first viable female candidate for president, she has become the repository of many women's contradictory hopes and fears. To some she's a sellout who changed her name and her hairstyle when it suited her husband's career; to others she's a hardworking idealist with the political savvy to work effectively within the system. Where one person sees a carpetbagger, another sees a dedicated politician; where one sees a humiliated and long-suffering wife, another sees a dignified First Lady. Is she tainted by the scandals of her husband's presidency, or has she gained experience and authority from weathering his missteps? Cold or competent, overachiever or pioneer, too radical or too moderate, Hillary Clinton continues to overturn the assumptions we make about her.

In Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary, New Yorker editor Susan Morrison has compiled this timely collection of thirty original pieces by America's most notable women writers. This pointillistic portrait paints a composite picture of Hillary Clinton, focusing on details from the personal to the political, from the hard-hitting to the whimsical, to give a well-balanced and unbiased view of the woman who may be our first Madam President. Taken together, these essays—by such renowned writers as Daphne Merkin, Lorrie Moore, Deborah Tannen, Susan Cheever, Lionel Shriver Kathryn Harrison, and Susan Orlean—illuminate the attitudes that women have toward the powerful women around them and constitute a biography that is must reading for anyone interested in understanding this complex and controversial politician.

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Is there anyone who is neutral about Hillary Clinton? It isn't even as simple as you love her or you hate her, although there are plenty of people who do simply love her or hate her. Many of us want to like her or used to like her or liked her during the brief period between finding out about Bill's Oval Office tryst with an intern and the moment she uttered "vast right-wing conspiracy." Quite a few people would love to see a woman as president but can't bear the thought of that woman being Hillary Clinton. What is it about her? What is it about us?

Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary gathers thirty essays by women who think and write for a living. Most of the pieces here take the subject seriously, notwithstanding a trivial piece by Susan Orlean on whether Clinton is a cat person or a dog person and a mock high school yearbook page by Patricia Marx ("pet peeves: bad punctuation, martial law"). Some essays seem frivolous at first, but turn out to be quite thoughtful, such as Mimi Sheraton's look at Hillary through her taste in food and Lauren Collins on Clinton's apparent lack of hobbies.

Several writers have written about Hillary Clinton before and stand by their controversial opinions such as Robin Givhan on Clinton's cleavage. On the other hand, Judith Warner all but apologizes for her 1992 biography, Hillary Clinton: The Inside Story: Revised and Updated, which at least one reviewer called a hagiography.

There are no right-wing hit jobs in this collection, but Laura Kipnis does a survey of Hillary biographies (many of which fall into the hit job category) and finds they reveal more about the authors than about Clinton. Rebecca Mead examines how women presidents have been portrayed in movies and TV.

Deborah Tannen explores the double standard that women in authority face in the most even-handed piece in the book. Letty Cottin Pogrebin observes that for women leaders, widowhood is a plus. Susan Lehman speculates on how fifteen years as a corporate lawyer formed Clinton's outlooks and habits. Lara Vapnyar gives us the Russian view of women in power (not favorable).

The writers here ponder Clinton's name changes, her changes in appearance, her vote to go to war in Iraq. They consider her marriage, her career as a lawyer, and the compromises she's made as a politician. You may not come to any new conclusions about Clinton, but Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary will give you some original angles on a very provocative subject.
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I'm betting the editors of the recently released collection of essays called Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary were assuming the presidential political landscape would look a bit different today, at least from a marketing point of view.

If the primary race was over and Hillary had become the Democratic nominee after Super Tuesday, as many expected would happen, they probably sensed that this baby would be a best-seller.

There isn't a lot that's particularly revealing about Clinton in Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary. It's more a volume of essays about how the various authors feel about her and view her in ways (usually) not covered by the main stream media.

I was a little surprised at the critical and sometimes flip tone of some of the authors. Some of the essays ponder who is the real HRC? Is she a dog person or a cat person? Is she better or worse than Lady Macbeth? What did she like to snack on in the White House?

(Can you imagine the outcry if someone had written a similar volume about any of the men candidates?)

While entertaining and well-written, I'd like to look at Hillary in a 31st way.

What would her candidacy have looked like if she hadn't married Bill?

What if she had married someone else, kept her name and was still Hillary Rodham? If we take the Bill Clinton lens off the glasses through which we scrutinize Hillary, what would an objective look at her candidacy be? I have a feeling it would be much more charitable in terms of her experience, her personality and her judgment.

To be sure, there are plenty of more serious essays in the Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary, but I was saddened that the publisher was more concerned about having people write about Hillary's hobbies, or lack thereof, than taking a real look at this woman and what has propelled her to this place in life.

No, it wasn't meant to be a biography, but when we write about women candidates in this way, do we continue to diminish them, as well as ourselves?
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