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eBook Television and the Fear of Crime (I.B.A.Television Research Monograph) ePub

by Barrie Gunter

eBook Television and the Fear of Crime (I.B.A.Television Research Monograph) ePub
Author: Barrie Gunter
Language: English
ISBN: 0861961196
ISBN13: 978-0861961191
Publisher: University of Luton Press (February 1987)
Pages: 112
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 534
Formats: lrf lrf azw mobi
ePub file: 1480 kb
Fb2 file: 1921 kb

Violence in television - Social aspects.

Violence in television - Social aspects. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station17. cebu on February 6, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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Television and the fear of crime. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Television and the fear of crime from your list? Television and the fear of crime. Published 1987 by J. Libbey in London Series. MLCM 91/04391 (H). The Physical Object. 104 p. ; Number of pages. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

Television viewing and fear of crime: Where is the mean world? . Crime and the racial fears of White Americans. Deviant Behavior: An Interdisciplinary Journal 13, 373-389.

Television viewing and fear of crime: Where is the mean world? Basic and Applied Social Psychology 8, 97-123. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 539, 59-71.

Investigated the impact of components of newspaper crime reports on fear of crime in an examination in which key newspaper components were based on theorizing in the areas of downward comparison, attribution, and normative behavior.

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on television? (please select one ) (a) makes us more likely to become a victim of crime (b) has no measurable effect on our perception of crime (c) Can alleviate our anxiety about crime (d) Markedly increase our fear of crime.

b) has no measurable effect on our perception of crime. c) Can alleviate our anxiety about crime. d) Markedly increase our fear of crime.

Television, newspapers, books, magazines, the Internet, and .

Television, newspapers, books, magazines, the Internet, and most any other. subconsciously or consciously watch out for African American crime more than white crime. However, this is not a phenomenon that can. In regard to fear of crime, the fear and heightened perceived risk that television may en culture leads to increased acquiescence to and dependence upon established authority (Gerbner, 1976, p. 175). The TV world contains much more violence than the real world (Gerbner, 1976). TV viewing, fear of crime relationship held only for those respondents who expressed a belief in the truth of television drama (Potter, 1986).

The fear of crime refers to the fear of being a victim of crime as opposed to the actual probability of being a victim of crime. The fear of crime, along with fear of the streets and the fear of youth, is said to have been in Western culture for "time immemorial".

Dimensions of Television Violence. Violence on Television: An Analysis of Amount, Nature, Location and Origin of Violence in British Programmes (Routledge Progress in Psychology, 3). Barrie Gunter, Jackie Harrison.

Barrie Gunter, Michael Svennevig. Television today is an integral part of the family household and at the same time family groups form a central feature of some television programmes. Thus, television is intertwined with family life both behind and in front of the screen. But what is the nature of television's involvement with the family? What do families watch? How are decisions about viewing taken in family households? How is family life portrayed on television and how does it reflect back on those families watching? Does television teach about, and thereby influence, aspects of family.

This monograph presents new research findings from Britain and worldwide, to discuss the relationship between television and crime. Different types of risk from crime are distinguished: does television make people more afriad of crime or do fearful people stay indoors and watch more television? The report concludes that television does not have the powerful, across-the-board influence on perceptions of crime. Viewers are found to be discriminating both in their perceptions of crime and violence as shown on television and in their judgements about crime in reality. Nevertheless, there is some indication that fear of crime may encourage people to stay indoors where they watch more television, and that certain beliefs about crime and justice produce selective viewing of programmes which offer further reinforcements to those beliefs.
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