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eBook Sex and Destiny: Politics of Human Fertility ePub

by Dr. Germaine Greer

eBook Sex and Destiny: Politics of Human Fertility ePub
Author: Dr. Germaine Greer
Language: English
ISBN: 0436188015
ISBN13: 978-0436188015
Publisher: Martin Secker & Warburg Ltd; 1st ed. edition (February 27, 1984)
Pages: 479
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 308
Formats: lrf lrf docx lit
ePub file: 1744 kb
Fb2 file: 1923 kb

The problem with the quote was that Greer tried to substitute the word "mother" for the phrase "mother nature", as a means of justifying abortion.

Unlike many progressive thinkers hesitant to criticize the family planning movement for fear of landing themselves in bed with the "radical religious right", Greer takes on Planned Parenthood founder, eugenicist Margaret Sanger; her cohort, Marie Stopes; UNFPA; USAID; and more. The problem with the quote was that Greer tried to substitute the word "mother" for the phrase "mother nature", as a means of justifying abortion.

Sex and Destiny book. Germaine Greer is an Australian born writer, journalist and scholar of early modern English literature, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the later 20th century.

Germaine Greer is a writer, academic, and critic, and is widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist . Her bestselling books include "The Female Eunuch" and "The Whole Woman".

Germaine Greer is a writer, academic, and critic, and is widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of our time. She lives in northwest Essex, England, and has taught Shakespeare at universities in Australia, Britain, and the United States.

Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility (1984) continued Greer's critique of Western attitudes toward sexuality, fertility, and family, and the imposition of those attitudes on the rest of the world. Her targets again include the nuclear family, government intervention in sexual behaviour, and the commercialisation of sexuality and women's bodies. She argued that the Western promotion of birth control in the Third World was in large part driven not by concern for human welfare but by the traditional fear and envy of the rich towards the fertility of the poor.

Sex and Destiny is one of the most important books to be written this century. quote from Fay Wheldon from back cover. Manufacturer: Macmillan Release date: 11 January 1985 ISBN-10 : 0330285513 ISBN-13: 9780330285513. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

GERMAINE GREER-an Australian-born writer, broadcaster, and retired academic-is widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of our time. Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility. Greer’s ideas have created controversy ever since The Female Eunuch became an international bestseller in 1970, turning her into a household name overnight and bringing her both adulation and criticism. She is the author of numerous feminist books, including The Whole Woman, a sequel to The Female Eunuch, and The Change. The Obstacle Race: The Fortunes of Women Painters and Their Work.

Germaine Greer is an acclaimed Australian author and academician. This biography of Germaine Greer provides detailed information about her childhood, life, works, achievements and timeline. Some of her other notable publications include, ‘Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility’, ‘The Change: Women, Ageing and the Menopause’, ‘Shakespeare's Wife’ and ‘The Whole Woman’. She has also been a columnist for ‘The Sunday Times’ and ‘The Guardian’. She has appeared on the television shows such as ‘Nice Time’, ‘Celebrity Big Brother’ and the British BBC mockumentary, ‘Come Fly with Me’.

Greer, Germaine, 1939-. A child is born - The importance of fertility - The curse of sterility - Chastity as a form of birth control - Polymorphous perversity - The short history of contraception - Abortion and infanticide - Changing concepts of sexuality - The fate of the family - Eugenics - The population lobby -. - Governments as family planners - The reproductive future - The myth of overpopulation. The author examines customs and attitudes toward fertility, chastity, promiscuity, abortion, contraception, and infanticide.

Germaine Greer, Sex and Destiny, The Politics of Human Fertility, Secker and Warburg, London, 1984, 469 pp. £. 5 hardback, ISBN 0 436 18801 5. Neena L. Chappell (a1). Centre on Aging, The University of Manitoba. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 14 November 2008.

The author of "The Female Eunuch" examines parent-child relationships in the West, Middle East, India, and Africa and explores the possibility that Western culture hates its children and takes little pleasure from family life
Kage
This book ought to be required reading in every high school. Unfortunately, it's out of print and has received all of two Amazon reviews--indicating that it must be some kind of radical nonsense from an academic apostate who probably rose to fame as a result of all that hippy stuff back in the sixties. Of course, plenty of people don't like Germain Greer--she must be on the Guiness list of "most unliked" people--but that's because she was ahead of her time. This book makes the case that the first world shouldn't tell the the third world how to have families, for two very good reasons. First, we don't understand the third world and so we can't tell people what to do. Secondly, we don't understand sex, so we have no business telling people how to have sex. It's not a difficult argument to follow, it's just unpleasant and many people are offended by the idea that they don't understand anything about anybody and should shut up. It really annoys bullies when they are revealed to have feet of clay and brains of dung. Germain Greer is still ahead of her time. One day, in the far future, somebody will read her and exclaim "What's so radical about this? It's common sense!" but that day is not today. Today, most of the smarty-pants who still read books will read Sex and Destiny: The Politics of Human Fertility and start to take it apart on logical grounds, disputing Greer's portrayal of blissful Indian families, when we all know that woman burning is a popular hobby in India. They'll also point out how she's suggesting weird and kinky sexual practices instead of straight-up manly sex like God intended. Or Goddess. Go ahead. Edit your rebuttal to taste. It's only humanity.
Detenta
Greer worries at the beginning of this book that she may be overdoing it, and people may be alienated rather than persuaded. That's certainly true for me.

When people found this book to be an odd contrast to The Female Eunuch (which I also didn't like), Greer said that it is consistent, being taken from the bits of the earlier book that no-one liked. The parts where Greer, moved by loving close-knit Italian family life decides that it would be a great idea to buy an Italian farm and have her children raised by her tenants. Except for visits, she would continue her sophisticated life in decadent England. (She has denied this, but read the book.) The parts where she said she changed her style of dressing in order not to make a spectacle of herself in rural Italy, after urging the rest of us women in the Western-industrial cultures (WICs) to join her in making a spectacle of ourselves at home.

The greatest flaw in Greer's consideration of birth control is that she seemingly cannot see the difference between having two children, or twelve, or twenty-two. She argues as if one is for or against children, and cannot want a limited number of them. She is wildly indignant about the death of one woman from an IUD and oblivious to the much more common deaths of women from complications of pregnancy and childbirth. She incidentally defends selective female infanticide and argues that women may be responsible for rape, since men may need for us to appear to be afraid of them.

I can appreciate the need to accept other people's right to their own values, but why is Greer such a hypocrite about it? She is extremely intolerant towards anyone in WICs, even, or especially, if they seem to share the attitudes that she lauds here. She talks loving of the traditional cultures' warmth towards their children, although she mocks parental and marital devotion in WICs. Greer's thinking seems to be permanently warped by her bad relationship with her parents, especially her mother, but she refuses to consider that others in WICs may have found family life more satisfying. Throughout her writings, I cannot get over the feeling that one of her chief purposes is to offload responsibility for the Greers' problems outward to "society"; she seems to believe that in any other type of culture, she would have had a happy childhood. Perhaps that is why the woman given to sharp and incisive comments about her own society is so gormlessly naive about others, accepting everything at simple face value, assuming that everything functions according to those societies' highest ideals. All spouses are loving, all parents are devoted.

Beyond the stupidity and hypocrisy of her opinions, it's simply not a good book. As usual it is inflated with extraneous material, arrogant and illogically argued. Obviously, it is possible to do a lot of research on a subject without gaining much insight.
Small Black
Greer misappropriated a quote she'd read, without attribution, by Ernest Becker. Here's that quote:

“Mother nature is a brutal bitch, red in tooth and claw, who destroys what she creates.” ... from Ernest Becker's 1974 Pulitzer Price-winning book "The Denial of Death".

The problem with the quote was that Greer tried to substitute the word "mother" for the phrase "mother nature", as a means of justifying abortion.

I thought it was appalling that she would use the quote in that manner. Mother nature may be a "brutal bitch", but mothers should be nurturers! As should fathers, for that matter!

Our future relies on our willingness to protect our progeny.
Mr.Twister
Germaine Greer takes no prisoners in this extensively researched, insighfully analytical account of human fertility - and the First World's influence upon fertility in the developing world. Unlike many progressive thinkers hesitant to criticize the family planning movement for fear of landing themselves in bed with the "radical religious right", Greer takes on Planned Parenthood founder, eugenicist Margaret Sanger; her cohort, Marie Stopes; UNFPA; USAID; and more. A caustically-written yet somber look at the harm incurred by both misguided and insidious meddling in foreign affairs.
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