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eBook Black Theology USA and South Africa: Politics, Culture and Liberation (Bishop Henry Mcneal Turner Studies in North American Black Religion) ePub

by Dwight N. Hopkins

eBook Black Theology USA and South Africa: Politics, Culture and Liberation (Bishop Henry Mcneal Turner Studies in North American Black Religion) ePub
Author: Dwight N. Hopkins
Language: English
ISBN: 0883446391
ISBN13: 978-0883446393
Publisher: Orbis Books (October 1, 1989)
Pages: 249
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.9
Votes: 157
Formats: lrf rtf txt lrf
ePub file: 1226 kb
Fb2 file: 1492 kb

James H. Cone’s Black Theology and Black Power appeared in March 1969

James H. Cone’s Black Theology and Black Power appeared in March 1969. NCBC and the black church had finally received a scholarly work, which sharply presented the black religious experience, not merely as a challenge to the sociological practice of the white church, but as a devastating critique of the white THEOLOGY dominant in white and black churches. Cone dropped a bombshell

The Bishop Henry McNeal Turner Studies in North American Black Religion, .  . University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa.

The Bishop Henry McNeal Turner Studies in North American Black Religion, . Vincent T. Maphai (a1). Published online by Cambridge University Press: 23 May 2014.

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream.

book by Dwight N. Hopkins. Black Theology U. S. A. and South Africa : Politics, Culture, and Liberation. by Dwight N. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream.

differences and similarities between black theology in the United States and black theology in South Africa. Black Theology USA and South Africa: Politics, Culture and Liberation (Bishop Henry Mcneal Turner Studies in North American Black Religion, Vol 4). ISBN.

Through a critical analysis of leading religious thinkers, Hopkins explores the fundamental differences and similarities between black theology in the United States and black theology in South Africa. 159752476X (ISBN13: 9781597524766).

politics, culture, and liberation. Published 1989 by Orbis Books in Maryknoll, . The Bishop Henry McNeal Turner studies in North American Black religion ;, vol. 4. Classifications. Internet Archive Wishlist, Doctrinal Theology, Black theology, History.

The Black Christ (Bishop Henry McNeal Turner/Sojourner Truth Series in Black . Liberation and Reconciliation: A Black Theology, Westminster, John Knox, 2005.

The Black Christ (Bishop Henry McNeal Turner/Sojourner Truth Series in Black Religion), New York: Orbis Books, 1994. Dube, Musa W. And Staley, Jeffrey L. John and Postcolonialism London: Sheffield Academic Press, 2002. DuBois, W. E. B. The Souls of Black Folk New York: Dover Publications 1994. Hopkins, Dwight N. Down, Up and Over: Slave Religion and Black Theology, Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2000. and Cummings, George.

keywords Henry McNeal Turner, rhetorical theology, rhetorical criticism, Black. In this essay, I argue that Henry McNeal Turner was doing something way more. complex than just declaring God is a Negro when he uttered this iconic. theology, public theology, rhetoric. On October 27, 1895, at Friendship Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, African. Methodist Episcopal (AME) bishop Henry McNeal Turner delivered a sermon at. the first gathering of the National Baptist Convention. Turner filled the sermon with.

Cone’s first book, Black Theology and Black Power, had been released the year . J. Deotis Roberts, Liberation and Reconciliation: A Black Theology, Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press, 1974.

Cone’s first book, Black Theology and Black Power, had been released the year before (1969), and the global theological community was wrestling with this new concept of a black theology. The faculty at Union and Columbia, including the African-American faculty at that time were not exempt from doubt that such a thing as a black theology had any. biblical or historical foundation. Cone and black theology sparked other theological traditions that look at other forms of oppression.

and South Africa: Politics, Culture, and Liberation. Black Theology USA and South Africa b.Bishop Henry McNeal Turner Studies in North Amer. Black Theology USA and South Africa: Politics, Culture, and. United States; African-American culture; "Black Skin, White Mask" The Myth of the Homogenous African

Atlanta, Georgia, African Methodist Episcopal (AME) bishop Henry McNeal Turner delivered a sermon at the .

Atlanta, Georgia, African Methodist Episcopal (AME) bishop Henry McNeal Turner delivered a sermon at the first gathering of the National Baptist Convention. Turner filled the sermon with critiques of the status quo and the racism that continued unabated. 11 The last chapter of Stephen W. Angell’s Bishop Henry McNeal Turner and African American Religion in the South (Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee, 1992) and Anthony Pinn’s Double Consciousness in Nineteenth Century Nationalism: Reflections on the Teachings of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, Journal of Religious Thought 52, n. (Summer– Fall 1995): 15– 26.

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Dwight N. Hopkins is a professor of theology at the University of Chicago and an ordained American Baptist minister. He has written/edited many other books, such as Introducing Black Theology of Liberation,Shoes That Fit Our Feet: Sources for a Constructive Black Theology,Heart and Head: Black Theology: Past, Present, and Future,Black Theology-Essays on Gender Perspectives,Black Theology-Essays on Global Perspectives,Down, Up, and Over: Slave Religion and Black Theology, etc.

He wrote in the Introduction to this 1989 book, “My purpose in this work is to interpret black theology in the United States of America (BTUSA) and black theology in South America (BTSA). It poses and seeks to answer this major question: What is the common denominator between the two black theologies? It develops one basic claim: Both theologies understand political and cultural liberation as the heart of the gospel message… this core message translates into the gospel of liberation against racism and other forms of oppression… The common denominator between these two theologies is their stress on both political liberation and cultural liberation, that it, the common denominator … is the gospel of cultural and political liberation against white racism and other forms of oppression.” (Pg. 2)

He notes, “The seeds of black theology in the United States sprouted with the formation of [the National Committee of Black Churchmen] in 1966. However, not until the spring of 1969 would a little-known theologian bring those seeds to fruition. James H. Cone’s Black Theology and Black Power appeared in March 1969. NCBC and the black church had finally received a scholarly work, which sharply presented the black religious experience, not merely as a challenge to the sociological practice of the white church, but as a devastating critique of the white THEOLOGY dominant in white and black churches. Cone dropped a bombshell.” (Pg. 18)

He observes, “In response to the racism of white Christianity, black theology in South Africa asserted its own theological agenda and incorporated the black reality of indigenous religious experience and struggle for liberation into the Christian hermeneutic… Around this basic issue, a constellation of other matters crystallized. Was Christianity ever meant for black people? How authentic was the church in catering to black needs?... Did the Christian God support black acceptance of apartheid?... Did Jesus Christ belong to the Afrikaner and white, English-speaking liberals, and blacks toe the line of Ham?... To resolve these questions blacks turned to themselves and found that the gospel message complemented their own lived circumstances… black Christians discovered a God of freedom who called black humanity into wholeness… because God incarnated in this particular oppressed Jesus, a meaningful contemporary symbol of God’s presence in South Africa revealed a black Christ.” (Pg. 29-30)

He suggests, “It is something of a misnomer to classify Cleage’s interpretation of Jesus [i.e., The Black Messiah] as Christology in the classical conception of the doctrine of Christ. Cleage hardly displays any interest in the resurrected Christ. For him the messiahship belongs to Jesus not because of Good Friday and Easter, but strictly as a result of Jesus’ life and earthly activity in attempting to reconstitute the black nation. Thus Cleage apparently avoids a dichotomy between the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith. With Cleage’s black Messiah, the Jesus of history is an identical twin with the Jesus of faith in the fight against racism and for black liberation.” (Pg. 38)

He points out, “I characterize the theological bent of Cone … as a Black Christian Theology of Liberation. It is BLACK because he equates the black experience with the primary datum of black theology. It is CHRISTIAN because the foundational inquiry for his theology remains: ‘What does the Christian gospel have to say to powerless black [people] whose existence is threatened daily by the insidious tentacles of white power?’ It is THEOLOGY because Cone reflects on the very presence of God ‘actively involved in the present-day affairs of [black people].’ And it is about LIBERATION because he surmises liberation as the ‘central idea for articulating the gospel of Jesus.’ The Christian gospel of liberation and the liberation of the poor form the heart of Cone’s systematic theology.” (Pg. 43)

He notes that “[J. Deotis] Roberts [in Liberation And Reconciliation: A Black Theology] does not wish to challenge white Americans to worship a black Christ. Thus Roberts does not demand a vengeful repentance from them for worshipping a white Christ. This type of ‘revenge’ would dehumanize whites as they have done to blacks. Besides, affirmation of a black Christ, for Roberts, includes room for a white Christ. But, applying his balanced methodology, if whites could overcome their superior-inferior state of mind and color-consciousness and could worship a black messiah, then reconciliation would be nearer. Still, Roberts claims, real reconciliation through black and white equality would allow American blacks and whites to transcend the skin color of Christ and reach out to a ‘universal Christ’ without color.” (Pg. 49-50)

He states that Gayraud S. Wilmore [in Black Religion and Black Radicalism] says that black theology “is not the mere opposite of the dominant … white classical theology. On the contrary, black theology gains its validity in plumbing the meaning of black freedom from specific black theological resources… black theology fulfills its proper tasks when it points the way toward the total black community’s emancipation. Furthermore, the norm of black theology is freedom for black people and, in that process, freedom for all God’s humanity. Thus Wilmore works on a black theology leaning more toward the liberation strands in non-Christian black movements.” (Pg. 65) Later, he adds, “Wilmore does indeed recognize the inseparability of political and cultural liberation. Yet he shuns a one-sided goal of only political liberation because he believes that it yields a deformed achievement… one cannot consummate the fullest measure of human liberation while remaining captive to the oppressor’s culture.” (Pg. 69)

He suggests, “God likewise has provided a different black religious and cultural structure for dealing with life and black folk’s divine interaction. Unlike the political theologians, the cultural theologians explore the rhythm and texture of black faith’s linguistic structure. They raise important issues: What impact does black religious language have on black life? Does the syntax and cadence of black talk about God affect black folk’s perception of God in their daily activities?... In summation, the cultural trend differs from the political trend by examining non-church theology, Africa’s influence, cultural resources and black language. The two trends contrast and complement each other. They both begin with black freedom from white oppression and white theology, and God’s involvement in black liberation.” (Pg. 89)

He argues, “a black theology of liberation cannot reach its full potential without serious attention to a liberating black culture. One does not sense the importance of black music, dance, language, folklore, art, literature, theater, poetry, African traditional religions and African Christianity in the black political theology trend…. The black political theology trend, it seems, has not comprehensively explored the liberating nature of the unique ‘Africanness’ and ‘blackness’ in their political theology.” (Pg. 120)

He acknowledges, “Admittedly black Americans and black South African theologians come together in the body of Christ… But to declare reconciliation with ‘the white man’ as a unifying dialogical point would have the impact of raising a red flag before a charging bull… a doctrine of black-white reconciliation pricks deeply at the theological dissonance in BTUSA…. Though James Cone does not negate possible black-white reconciliation, resulting from potential creative changes in the ‘white oppressor,’ he stresses black-black reconciliation as a priority. Simiilarly, he would lean more to first establishing a reconciliation project between blacks and liberation theologies in Africa, Asia and Latin America.” (Pg. 153-154)

He also admits, “So far we have not spoken of black women’s participation in black theology. Our silence is caused by black women’s ‘invisibility’ in critical reflection on North American and South African black faith. However, at the December 1986 conference, the reasons for this forced invisibility was dramatically capsulized when one of the prominent male theologians laughed at the ‘black female’ identity of God. This laughter signified more than one individual. It uncovered all black male theologians’ collusion in silencing the voices of over one-half the black community and sixty to seventy percent of the black church. It was a sound of insecure arrogance and frightened male power… For black men to participate in causing black women’s pain delegitimizes the entire theological enterprise.” (Pg. 163)

He proposes, “the contemporary basis for joint theological efforts emerges out of parallel theodicies in the black American and black South African quagmires. Both peoples suffer the scars of white racism… to be black in the United States or South Africa inherently entails dodging the destructive attempts of white racist politics and white supremacist culture… the normative theological anthropology is white people: the mocking of God by the white power structure. today black Americans and black South Africans confront analogous problem that exhorts an analogous resolution.” (Pg. 168-169)

He concludes, “the normative axis of political-cultural liberation of the black working poor would also regulate our penultimate vision. Thus, in a new society the working poor in general and the black working poor in particular would communally or collectively own and control wealth and the distribution of wealth. Simultaneously the black community under the leadership of the black working poor, would have the right to determine for itself, as a group, how to bring its various cultural talents and pursuits to full creativity. For a black theology of liberation the culture of politics and the politics of culture go hand-in-hand. Only when the black poor has attained the fullest heights of its political and cultural emancipation, will a black theology of political-cultural liberation jointly created by black theology in the United States and black theology in South Africa fulfill its mission.” (Pg. 180)

This book will be of great interest to students of Black Theology, as well as Religion in Africa.
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