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eBook Rum, Sodomy and the Lash: Piracy, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity ePub

by Hans Turley

eBook Rum, Sodomy and the Lash: Piracy, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity ePub
Author: Hans Turley
Language: English
ISBN: 0814782248
ISBN13: 978-0814782248
Publisher: NYU Press; New edition edition (June 1, 2001)
Pages: 184
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 816
Formats: lrf azw mbr rtf
ePub file: 1978 kb
Fb2 file: 1259 kb

Hans Turley shows the ways in which sodomy and piracy are inextricable from the cultural imagination of the eighteenth century and, in doing so, encourages us to rethink not only pirate history, but the history of sexuality.

Hans Turley shows the ways in which sodomy and piracy are inextricable from the cultural imagination of the eighteenth century and, in doing so, encourages us to rethink not only pirate history, but the history of sexuality as well. George E. Haggerty,University of California, Riverside. Hans Turley was Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut. Start reading Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash on your Kindle in under a minute.

How did the pirate's world, marked as it was by sexual and economic transgression, come to capture our collective imagination? In Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash, Hans Turley delves deep into the archives to examine the homoerotic and other culturally transgressive aspects of th. .

Despite, or perhaps because of, our lack of actual knowledge about pirates, an immense architecture of cultural mythology has arisen around them. Three hundred years of novels, plays, painting, and movies have etched into the popular imagination contradictory images of the pirate as both arch-criminal and anti-hero par excellence. How did the pirate-a real threat to mercantilism and trade in early-modern Britain-become the hypermasculine anti-hero familiar to us through a variety of pop culture outlets? How did the pirate.

Although the book contains a fair amount about sodomy, it has little, too little, about the lash, and, alas, nothing at.

Although the book contains a fair amount about sodomy, it has little, too little, about the lash, and, alas, nothing at all about the kill-devil rum. Moreover, the book is no.The essays written in memory of Hans Turley extend his intellectual legacy by considering themes partly inspired by his ground-breaking Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash: Piracy, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity (New York, 1999), including transformations in the sex/gender system, the emergence of heteronormativity, the dynamics of same-sex desire, and queer friendship and sociability.

Hans Turley shows the ways in which sodomy and piracy are inextricable from the cultural imagination of the eighteenth century and, in doing so, encourages us to rethink not only pirate history, but the history of sexuality. This item: Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash: Piracy, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity. There's a problem loading this menu right now.

Turley makes broad and sweeping generalizations about pirates and their sexuality in this book.

Rum Sodomy & the Lash is the second studio album by the London-based folk punk band The Pogues, released on 5 August 1985. The album reached number 13 in the UK charts

Rum Sodomy & the Lash is the second studio album by the London-based folk punk band The Pogues, released on 5 August 1985. The album reached number 13 in the UK charts. The track "A Pair of Brown Eyes", based on an older Irish tune, reached number 72 in the UK singles chart. The Old Main Drag" later appeared on the soundtrack to the film My Own Private Idaho.

Hans Turley - Rum, Sodomy and the Lash: Piracy, Sexuality and Masculine Identity. oceedings{Dening2002HansT, title {Hans Turley - Rum, Sodomy and the Lash: Piracy, Sexuality and Masculine Identity}, author {G. M. Dening}, year {2002} }. G. Dening.

Piracy, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity. Publisher: NYU Press. Print ISBN: 9780814782248, 0814782248.

Despite, or perhaps because of, our lack of actual knowledge about pirates, an immense architecture of cultural mythology has arisen around them. Three hundred years of novels, plays, painting, and movies have etched into the popular imagination contradictory images of the pirate as both arch-criminal and anti-hero par excellence. How did the pirate-a real threat to mercantilism and trade in early-modern Britain-become the hypermasculine anti-hero familiar to us through a variety of pop culture outlets? How did the pirate's world, marked as it was by sexual and economic transgression, come to capture our collective imagination?

In Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash, Hans Turley delves deep into the archives to examine the homoerotic and other culturally transgressive aspects of the pirate's world and our prurient fascination with it. Turley fastens his eye on historical documents, trial records, and the confessions of pirates, as well as literary works such as Robinson Crusoe, to track the birth and development of the pirate image and to show its implications for changing notions of self, masculinity, and sexuality in the modern era.

Turley's wide-ranging analysis provides a new kind of history of both piracy and desire, articulating the meaning of the pirate's contradictory image to literary, cultural, and historical studies.

Kifer
This is a very dry, dense, academic book that attempts to analyze what the author refers to as "sodomitical activity" in the golden age of piracy based on source documents original to the period. It is slow reading, and if you're looking for lurid gay sex and rampant queerness among pirates, just stick to Pirates of the Caribbean slashfic because it's not in here.
The author admits that due to social taboos of sodomy and homosexuality, the overt references in period works are basically non-existant. Instead however, he offers contextual readings of various documents, historical events, and literature of the period that makes a case for subtextual evidence of homosexual predilection among some pirates of the time (for example, the section of the Pirate's Articles that specifies no woman or boy be brought aboard ship, which he interprets as an implication that some crewmen might have regarded boys/boy prostitutes as desirable).
He does raise some interesting questions about the contrast between pirates being depicted at the time as "hypermasculine", and how that can be reconciled with the fact that pirate society was by nature "homosocial," and how its homosociality would allow for various types of relationships among the men. He also offers some very interesting criticism and ideas about the significance and homosexual implications of the Daniel Defoe novel Captain Singleton, in which the piratical hero develops a very close, committed, lifelong relationship with his shipmate, Quaker William.
Overall, though, the book is overly conscious of its own academic tone (in that sort of "in the following chapter I will endeavor to show (blah blah blah)" fashion, or, in the introduction a sort of itemization of "chapter one will explore such and such, and chapter two will investigate thus and that," etc) and the chapters do not hang together well in a linear fashion. The book is very choppy to read as a whole work, and seems like it might be a compendium of various essays on the topic that the author wrote over a span of several years, for various reasons, which by virtue of a common theme of homosexual investigation, he then cobbled together into a single book. The last chapter is such an exaustive explication of the Robinson Crusoe trilogy, largely avoiding the subject of homosexuality altogether, that I had to struggle to finish it.
So. Useful information in places, interesting ideas, not terribly readably executed. I would only recommend this book to those dedicated to a in-depth study of the history of piracy and/or gay history. It did make me interested in reading Captain Singleton at some point...
Cae
Book was okay but more of a text book than light reading. Review was a little misleading
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