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eBook Rereading Sex: Battles Over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America ePub

by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz

eBook Rereading Sex: Battles Over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America ePub
Author: Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz
Language: English
ISBN: 0375701869
ISBN13: 978-0375701863
Publisher: Vintage (October 14, 2003)
Pages: 528
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 922
Formats: mobi mbr lrf docx
ePub file: 1846 kb
Fb2 file: 1631 kb

Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America, 2002

Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America, 2002. Landscape in Sight : Looking at America,(with John Brinckerhoff Jackson), 1997. Love Across the Color Line, (ed. with Kathy Peiss), 1996. The Power and Passion of M. Carey Thomas, 1994. Campus Life : Undergraduate Cultures from the End of the Eighteenth Century to the Present, 1987. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, 1984. Culture and the City : Cultural Philanthropy in Chicago from the 1880s to 1917, 1974.

Our nation is used to hearing daytime talk show chatter about sexual abuse, homosexuality, prostitution, and more, but mentioning this universal and enjoyable practice as something that should be taught about (the religious right twisted her words into "should be taught") was enough to get Elders fired as Surgeon General.

A rich and surprising new telling of the journey of the iconic American soldier whose death turns out not to have been the main point of his life. Moved by the Board from the Biography category. On the Transmigration of Souls, by John Adams (Boosey & Hawkes). Premiered by the New York Philharmonic on September 19, 2002 at Avery Fisher Hall. Anna in the Tropics, by Nilo Cruz.

Conversations about sex are the focus of Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz’s Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America (2002).

From bawdy talk to evangelical sermons, and from celebrations of free. Conversations about sex are the focus of Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz’s Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America (2002).

In Rereading Sex, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz lets us listen to the national conversation about sex in the nineteenth century and hear voices that resonate in our own time. This is for those who wish to take the long lens, and an extremely academic, look at the public discussion of sexuality in 19th century America. Those who are looking for an, um, less academic study need to look elsewhere (titillation it is not). Horowitz demonstrates a thorough analysis of her subject, but presents it without becoming too bogged down in particular statistics.

Items related to Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and .

Items related to Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression. Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America. ISBN 13: 9780375401923. Rereading Sex is a big, important book about power and ideas, rogues and radicals, publishers and prudes, courtroom warriors and ordinary Americans trying to make sense of sex and their world. With insight and verve, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz transports the reader to the epicenter of the culture wars of the nineteenth century. The result is an original work of scholarship that is also a terrifically good read. Probing court records, pamphlets, and -sporting men's- magazines, Horowitz shows us a many-voiced America in which an earthy acceptance of desire and sexual expression collided with prohibitions broadcast from the pulpit.

Rereading Sex. Battles Over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America. By Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz. Category: 19th Century . Oct 14, 2003 528 Pages. Linda K. Kerber, author of No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies.

over sexual knowledge and suppression in nineteenth-century America. New York: Vintage Books. Human Rights Campaign. Unprotected texts: The Bible’s surprising contradictions about sex and desire. Kostenberger, Andreas

Rereading sex: Battles over sexual knowledge and suppression in nineteenth-century America. Kostenberger, Andreas. The Bible’s teaching on marriage and family. Guest and host in Judges 19: Lot's hospitality in an inverted world. Battles Over Sexual Knowledge and. Suppression in Nineteenth-Century America.

From bawdy talk to evangelical sermons, and from celebrations of free love to prosecutions for obscenity, nineteenth-century America encompassed a far broader range of sexual attitudes and ideas than the Victorian stereotype would have us believe. In Rereading Sex, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz lets us listen to the national conversation about sex in the nineteenth century and hear voices that resonate in our own time.Probing court records, pamphlets, and “sporting men’s” magazines, Horowitz shows us a many-voiced America in which an earthy acceptance of desire and sexual expression collided with prohibitions broadcast from the pulpit. We encounter fascinating reformers like Victoria Woodhull, who advocated free love and became the first woman to run for president; faddists like Sylvester Graham, who obsessed about the dangers of masturbation; and moral crusaders like Anthony Comstock, who succeeded in banning sexual subject matter from the mails. We also see how newspapers like the Sunday Flash treated prostitutes like celebrities and how the National Police Gazette found a legal way to write about explicity about sex through crime reports that read like gossip columns. Employing an encyclopedic knowledge artfully rendered, Horowitz brings to the fore a wide spectrum of attitudes and a debate echoed in the culture wars of today.
Kajikus
This is for those who wish to take the long lens, and an extremely academic, look at the public discussion of sexuality in 19th century America. Those who are looking for an, um, less academic study need to look elsewhere (titillation it is not). Horowitz demonstrates a thorough analysis of her subject, but presents it without becoming too bogged down in particular statistics. NIce job presenting the spectrum of thought in the 19th century while also connecting the course of history with the 18th and 20th centuries. Although a lot of her story is focused on NYC, the country at large is not forgotten. A book that delivers as advertised.
Fast Lovebird
This marvelous books contains lots of surprises: that legal censorship of written material about sex came later in the 19th century than I had suspected; that "scientific " reformers who believed that disseminating informaton about sex appeared on the scene earlier; and that the perception that masterbation was a threat to American society came not from religious fundamentalists but from the scientific theories of some of these same reformers. Elegantly written, and brilliantly researched, this book is a must for anyone wanting to understand the strange cross-cutting attitudes about sex in contemporary America.
Onnell
This is one of the most modern sexist narratives of history that I have ever encountered. Especially in the chapter about Victoria Woodhull, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz paints a picture of woman that is of emotional, vindictive people. She says that Woodhull "targets" Henry Beecher to further her own goals. I'm sorry, but it is not her fault that he actively denounced sexual relationships while simultaneously having an affair with his close friends wife for years. He is the definition of sexual hypocrisy. One would think that Horowitz would be critical of Beecher, but no, she condemns Woodhull for releasing this story. She treats as a moody woman who took her PMS out on an innocent, lovely pastor. I was incredibly disappointed with this book and I am ashamed that it was written so recently.
TheMoonix
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz says that she was puzzled by the stir in 1994 when Joycelyn Elders made a mild comment mentioning that masturbation might be taught about as part of sex education in schools. Our nation is used to hearing daytime talk show chatter about sexual abuse, homosexuality, prostitution, and more, but mentioning this universal and enjoyable practice as something that should be taught about (the religious right twisted her words into "should be taught") was enough to get Elders fired as Surgeon General. Why was there such a hysterical reaction to a mention of masturbation? Horowitz is a historian, a professor of American studies, and the one thing she could do to find an answer is historical research. She has done a mountain of it, looking into obscure court cases, journals, and newspapers, to produce the monumental _Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth Century America_ (Knopf). As the title reveals, Horowitz has not just covered ideas about masturbation (although ridiculous fears of that "evil" seem to have percolated through the minds of every parent and preacher of the time), but has covered the huge topic of what our predecessors thought about many aspects of sex.
The evangelical Christian movement sweeping across the country in the first half of the nineteenth century seized upon such worries about masturbators and lustful women, and "sinful lust became a chief way of comprehending sexual desire." The American Tract Society was particularly vehement on such issues, and was aghast at the scientific understanding of sexual function that was beginning at the time. Especially important was the protection of female virginity, and fear of pregnancy was a vital shield of the nation's maidenheads. Physiological explanations of birth control were seen as a special danger; unimpeded by fear of impregnation, there was no telling what the women would get up to. Tractarians saw the freethinkers who promoted sexual knowledge as blasphemers. Nothing shocked them more than the non-religious (and it was generally the freethinkers who promoted the spread of physiological ideas) insisting that women had similar sexual desires and need for satisfaction as men, or that birth control would promote happiness, health, and economic freedom. It is surprising that the Young Men's Christian Association looms large in these pages. The YMCA had as a goal the promotion of evangelical religion, and during the Civil War, it was worried about Union soldiers, displaced from home, and in 1865 the YMCA was able to advocate for a post office bill that would forbid mailing erotic prints and books, the first time the federal government tried to regulate moral content of mailed material. The anti-sex activities of the YMCA were linked to the famous and foolish reformer, Anthony Comstock, whose censorious aims even kept birth control information out of medical texts.
Horowitz has summarized four "frameworks" out of the confusing discourse about sex during the period. The Vernacular Tradition consists of sexual information (and misinformation) passed generally by word of mouth. Evangelical Christianity hated lust and equated most sexual activities with sin. Reform Physiology looked to the science of the body (often composed of wildly inaccurate assertions) to promote sexual freedom, and sometimes sexual restraint. And then there were Utopians, who thought sex was the central part of human existence and should be untouched by the government. These four voices, in the printed works and journals of the time, often overlapped and swamped each other with rhetoric. The huge number of philosophies and personalities which played a role in the debate, and made a foundation for our current sexual ideas, are brilliantly distilled into this large, well-referenced book, which is an entertaining academic tome without ever being fusty or tedious.
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