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eBook Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington ePub

by Robert J. Norrell

eBook Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington ePub
Author: Robert J. Norrell
Language: English
ISBN: 0674060377
ISBN13: 978-0674060371
Publisher: Belknap Press; Reprint edition (April 30, 2011)
Pages: 528
Category: Social Sciences
Subcategory: Social Sciences
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 360
Formats: rtf txt azw lrf
ePub file: 1523 kb
Fb2 file: 1131 kb

A life of Booker T. Washington - part biography, part history - attempts to put his brand of black empowerment into context. And the four centuries of oppression we black Americans endured gave us masking as a cultural habit.

A life of Booker T. The real fights within the black community - our internal culture wars - have been over which face we show white America. The legendary battle of ideas between Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois at the dawn of the 20th century was also a battle over masks: should we seem humble and modest or prideful and outraged? This mask war was vicious because group masks are mutually exclusive; each nullifies the other.

Instead of viewing Booker T. Washington from the vantage point of the modern civil rights era, Robert J. .Up from History is in all respects an exemplary book, scrupulously fair to its subject and thus to the reader as well. Norrell has placed him squarely in the violent context of late nineteenth-century Alabama (and American) race relations. The result is a compelling new biography that should lead apologists and critics of Washington to see him in a new light. Jonathan Yardley Washington Post Book World 2009-01-18).

Xi, 508 pages : 25 cm. Since the 1960s, Martin Luther King, J. has personified black leadership with his use of direct action protests against white authority. A century ago, in the era of Jim Crow, Booker T. Washington pursued a different strategy to lift his people. In this compelling biography, Norrell reveals how conditions in the segregated South led Washington to call for a less contentious path to freedom and equality. He urged black people to acquire economic independence and to develop the moral character that would ultimately gain them full citizenship.

Up from History book. As his title implies, Up From History, seeks to restore our understanding of Booker T. Washington by placing him firmly in the context of the post-reconstruction South. The misrepresentation of Washington began even during his life, as he was under constant attacks from both white supremacists in the south and northern black men who sought to replace him as the perceived leader of his race.

Robert J. Norrell’s book scrupulously fulfills this mandate (and then some) with shrewd tactics and a composed demeanor that its subject would have recognized and appreciated as resembling his own. Even though the book doesn’t let Washington wriggle free from his own miscalculations and contradictory impulses, its calm tone is enough to extract Washington from the hysteria that too often greeted his actions during his life-and for decades afterwards.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Main Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association UP FROM HISTORY: The Life of Booker T. Washingtonby Robert J. Norrell. Louisiana History: The Journal of the Louisiana Historical Association 2010, FALL Vol. 51; Iss. 4. UP FROM HISTORY: The Life of Booker T. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Washington. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2009. ISBN 978-0-674-03211-8. In Chapters one through five, Norrell chronicles Washington's life from 1865, when he was age nine, to September 18, 1895, the day he delivered the now infamous Atlanta Exposition speech, the speech that would characterize him as too conciliatory, too weakly dispositioned to White America. Norrell's intent in these chapters is clear; he paints a portrait of Washington's perceived weakness as necessary and bound by the times.

Robert Norrell is a history professor at the University of Tennessee. The Life of Booker T. Washington (Belknap Press; January 19, 2009). Following his remarks Mr. Norrell responded to questions from the audience. Robert Norrell talked about his book Up from History: The Life of Booker T. Robert Norrell is a history professor at the University of Tennessee. Closed Captioning Record People Graphical Timeline. All Speakers Robet J.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Lisa D. Cook and others published Up from History: The Life of Booker T.By Robert J. December 2009 · The Journal of American History.

By Robert J. The life of William Prynne, Puritan, to 1641. Washington – By Robert J.

Since the 1960s, Martin Luther King, J.

Since the 1960s, Martin Luther King, Jr., has personified black leadership with his use of direct action protests against white authority. A century ago, in the era of Jim Crow, Booker T. Washington pursued a different strategy to lift his people. In this compelling biography, Norrell reveals how conditions in the segregated South led Washington to call for a less contentious path to freedom and equality. He urged black people to acquire economic independence and to develop the moral character that would ultimately gain them full citizenship. Although widely accepted as the most realistic way to integrate blacks into American life during his time, Washington’s strategy has been disparaged since the 1960s.

The first full-length biography of Booker T. in a generation, Up from History recreates the broad contexts in which Washington worked: He struggled against white bigots who hated his economic ambitions for blacks, African-American intellectuals like W. E. B. Du Bois who resented his huge influence, and such inconstant allies as Theodore Roosevelt. Norrell details the positive power of Washington’s vision, one that invoked hope and optimism to overcome past exploitation and present discrimination. Indeed, his ideas have since inspired peoples across the Third World that there are many ways to struggle for equality and justice. Up from History reinstates this extraordinary historical figure to the pantheon of black leaders, illuminating not only his mission and achievement but also, poignantly, the man himself.

Soustil
Americans need to read this book to learn about Booker T. Washington. Though the author takes a measured approach (possibly because the last major biographer treated Washington like a Clinton or Nixon), he almost certainly establishes Booker T. Washington as one of the greatest heroes of American History. Rather than the simple "Booker T. Washington thought this, on the other hand W.E.B. DuBois thought that" that you get in American History in both high school and college, this book tells the story of Booker T. Washington and analyzes his positions and stands. Many American will be surprised to learn (if they cared) that Washington supported numerous challenges to segregation, and bemoaned Justice Holmes' rulings and some of his friend President Roosevelt's actions. All of this while touring endlessly not just to raise money and the support of rich titans of industry, but as an inspirational speaker for Southern and Northern Blacks in what has been called one of the toughest chapters in America. Let Professor Norrell tell the story. All that to say, there is much more to be learned in this book.
The book does read almost halfway between a scholarly analysis and a narrative history ala McCullough and Tuckman, but there is not a boring page.
Briciraz
This biography on Booker T Washington was very factual and insightful. I have been studying the life and work of Booker T Washington for a few years. This book by Robert J. Norrell has given me new information on Washington. This book reveals detailed information into Washington putting together Tuskegee Institute. It provides in depth details into Washington secret court challenges. The author paints Washington as a complex man in difficult circumstance, But who also was able to navigate around white nationalist in the south and Black Intellectuals in the north. Washington was a very intelligent and practical man. He is one of my personal heroes. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn the life and work of Booker T Washington.
Onaxan
This is a fanstastically well-written biography of Booker Washington, at times, reading like big-selling biographies like John Adams. While it is a biography, Robert Norrell's objective (hence the title) seems to be a redeeming of Booker Washington from the very one-sided treatment he often gets (as a sell-out, a conservative, or naive). Unlike these depictions, Norrell depicts Washington as a man skillfullly attempting to move a 'race' forward in a South that didn't take kindly to black success.

We go form Washington's early years (covered well by Washington's TWO memoirs) to the building of Tuskegee to Washington's attempts to 'lead' the black race in public consciousness. Washington was a tireless fundraiser, enlisting the aid of many rich white industrialists, for his Tuskegee Institute, as he would later be a tireless champion of black uplift. Washington travelled across the country giving speeches extolling the virtues of hard work, economic self-determination, and racial harmony. He worked tirelessly to promote black (industrial and academic, contra popular belief) education and crusade against various Southern attempts at black disenfranchisement. He was the first black man to dine with the President (Theodore Roosevelt) and family (for which he paid dearly by arousing deep ire among white Southerners). Washington acquired enough political respect to aid in making several recommendations on political appointments (leading to a very public death threat made against Washington by a then-sitting US Senator).

Perhaps because of Washington's success, he managed to anger both Southern white,s who saw Washington as a threat, and Northern blacks, who often saw Washington as too meek. Norrell, in fact, spends a lot of time discussing the relationship between Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, which went from quite friendly and collegial to highly tense. Norrell dissects carefully the (what one must call) smear campaign waged by Du Bois and others (like Monroe Trotter) to depict Washington as a kind of sell-out who quested for personal power but did little for 'real' black progress. In truth, Norrell shows, Washington quite frequently took the same positions as Du Bois and other Northern blacks; he just did it in a very cautious and often behind-the-scenes way so as not to counterproductively alienate or demonize whites.

To tell the truth, while I've always been a fan of Washington, this book caused me to rethink my comfort with Washington, perhaps not in the way Norrell intended. In the end, as Norrell admits, Washington's almost-singular focus on agitating for black economic rights failed as much as it succeeded. Washington, it seems, took for granted that the American capitalism he believed blacks could use to gain economic freedom would be enough - that blacks who could prove their ability would not be discriminated against in hiring, that whites would not use law to make it exceedingly difficult for blacks to have a 'fair shake' in the market. But whites, time and again, did push back using law and market pressures to maintain their 'supremacy' in the market. And while Washington did not neglect the political, he time and again focused on economic freedoms as if the same tactics already used by whites to keep blacks out of the market would be used in the future. (Ironically, this also proved Washington's scepticism toward government solutions right, as whites invariably used POLITICAL power whenever blacks WERE gaining economic footholds by their own merits.)

Long and short: this is an outstanding biography, both well-written and very thoughtful. It is easily one of the best books I've read this year, and one which helps give some nuance to a true American hero who deserves a rehearing.
Mala
Knowing little about Booker Washington, like most individuals in the US, I bought this book after seeing a very good play--Rag Times in which Booker is featured briefly. I enjoyed this book immensely. It is an excellent and insightful biography. It was an eye opener for me in terms of its historical context and the important constructive role played by Washington at an extremely difficult time for African Americans in the South. His leadership, experience and example afforded many others who came after him the opportunity to be more effective in gaining economic and political progress for African Americans.

The author takes great pain, and gives convincing evidence, to provide a critique of the prior unfair treatment of Booker by most historians. Also, one gets a better understanding of the racial attitudes of American Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson--the former supportive of Black progress, early in his administration, and the latter hostile to racial equality. The book further explains the munificence of great philanthropic Americans like Andrew Carnegie in helping Washington achieve his relentless efforts to improve the education of African Americans.

After reading the book, one will walk away, I think, with greater appreciation for Booker Washington, his times and the extraordinary difficulties that African Americans had to overcome following their freedom from bondage.
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