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eBook Whose Body? ePub

by Dorothy L Sayers

eBook Whose Body? ePub
Author: Dorothy L Sayers
Language: English
ISBN: 0575006765
ISBN13: 978-0575006768
Publisher: Gollancz; First Thus edition (1971)
Pages: 288
Category: Mystery
Subcategory: Thriller
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 936
Formats: lrf mobi azw lit
ePub file: 1799 kb
Fb2 file: 1117 kb

Whose Body? by. Dorothy L. Sayers. Rising Star Visionary Press. Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers is a mystery classic, originally published in 1923. The book is now Public Domain.

Whose Body? by.

by Dorothy L. Sayers (1898-1957). Though Sayers is now most commonly known as a detective novelist, that was not what Sayers envisioned at the start of her career. Mary Mark Ockerbloom and I are pleased to introduce Lord Peter Wimsey to the Internet. Sayers was one of the first women to get a degree from Oxford University, where she read Dante and wrote articles and poems for student magazines. After graduation, she published two short books of poetry ( Op. I and Catholic Tales and Christian Songs, both online at this site).

Dorothy L. Sayers Whose Body? To M. J. DEAR JIM: This book is your fault. If it had not been for your brutal insistence, Lord Peter would never have staggered through to the end of this enquiry. Pray consider that he thanks you with his accustomed suavity. Yours ever, D. L. S. I Oh, damn! said Lord Peter Wimsey at Piccadilly Circus. Hi, driver! The taxi man, irritated at receiving this appeal while negotiating the intrica. To M. I.

The fingers were long and muscular, with wide, flat joints and square tips. When he was playing his rather hard grey eyes softened, and his long, indeterminate mouth hardened in compensation. When he was playing his rather hard grey eyes softened, and his long, indeterminate mouth hardened in compensation ther time had he any pretensions to good looks, and at all times he was spoilt by a long, narrow chin, and a long, receding forehead, accentuated by the brushed-back sleekness of his tow-coloured hair. Labour papers, softening down the chin, caricatured him as a typical aristocrat. That's a wonderful instrument, said Parker

Librivox recording of Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers

Librivox recording of Whose Body? by Dorothy L. The book establishes many of Wimsey's character traits - for example, his interest in rare books, the nervous problems associated with his wartime shell-shock, and his ambiguous feelings about catching criminals for a hobby - and also introduces many characters who recur in later novels, such as Parker, Bunter, Sugg, and the Dowager Duchess.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Today, the book would be considered insensitive by the politically correct while anti-Semitics would condemn it for being favorable to Jews

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Today, the book would be considered insensitive by the politically correct while anti-Semitics would condemn it for being favorable to Jews. The rest of us can simply accept it as a slice of life in the 1920's. In my opinion, this first Peter Wimsey novel is a very good mystery but not as strong as subsequent works such as The Nine Tailors. Sayers herself considered her translation of Dante's Divine Comedy to be her greatest work. Note: There were no fingerprint or DNA data bases in 1923. There was no easy way to identify a body.

Whose Body? is a 1923 mystery novel by Dorothy L. Sayers, in which she introduced the character of Lord Peter Wimsey. Thipps, an architect, finds a dead body wearing nothing but a pair of pince-nez in the bath of his London flat

Whose Body? is a 1923 mystery novel by Dorothy L. Thipps, an architect, finds a dead body wearing nothing but a pair of pince-nez in the bath of his London flat. Lord Peter Wimsey - a nobleman who has recently developed an interest in criminal investigation as a hobby - resolves to investigate the matter privately.

Ieslyaenn
As the author is one of the luminaries of 'The Golden Age of Detective Fiction', Dorothy Sayers' novels are a must for fans of crime of any era. Yet I had never read one before, so to further my crime genre education, bought the first in the Lord Peter Wimsey series, Sayers' best known. I was prepared to be awed, but it took me some time to get into this book. This was due to some of the 1920s conventions which have become rather dated and jarred with this modern reader: the 1920s slang; the British aristocratic mannerisms; the matter-of-fact and even amused attitude of the detectives towards the horrific murders.
However, from the beginning I admired the elegant and deft prose, the cool wit and the confident unfolding of the byzantine plot which begins when an unidentified body is found in an architect's bath and a City of London financier goes missing. By the time I was half-way through I was fully acculturated to the 1920s and loved every aspect, especially how a darker tone is very gradually introduced and takes over by the end. The characters who had at first seemed generic stereotypes, were gradually revealed to be complex human beings, moulded by class, but credible individuals of any era. The 1920s context is expertly sketched and I became at least as familiar with it as I would if I'd read a social history of the period. An Appendix where Lord Peter's uncle pens his interpretation of his nephew's character is a neat touch. Sayers' novels are for those who read to coolly solve an extremely tricky puzzle, rather than those who want an emotional roller-coaster of fear and suspense which so many 21st century crime writers aim to provide.
'Whose Body' is highly recommended for students of the crime genre and lovers of beautifully wrought prose.
Amhirishes
Dorothy Sayers was one of the great British mystery authors, writing with verve and humour. She was associated with C.S. Lewis and the Inklings. She also attended meetings of the Socratic Club. C. S. Lewis said that he read Sayers' The Man Born to be King, a play about Jesus, every Easter. Sayers knew J. R. R. Tolkien who read some of the Wimsey novels but disliked the later ones, such as Gaudy Night.

Whose Body was written in the early 1920's. It reflects attitudes toward Jews which were common in Britain at the time. Today, the book would be considered insensitive by the politically correct while anti-Semitics would condemn it for being favorable to Jews. The rest of us can simply accept it as a slice of life in the 1920's.

In my opinion, this first Peter Wimsey novel is a very good mystery but not as strong as subsequent works such as The Nine Tailors. Sayers herself considered her translation of Dante's Divine Comedy to be her greatest work.

Note: There were no fingerprint or DNA data bases in 1923. There was no easy way to identify a body.
Cala
“Bunter!”
“Yes, my lord.”
“Her Grace tells me that a respectable Battersea architect has discovered a dead man in his bath.” “Indeed, my lord? That’s very gratifying.”
“Very, Bunter. Your choice of words is unerring. I wish Eton and Balliol had done as much for me."

I did not really have any expectations, this book having been my first from Dorothy L. Sayers, just some curiosity of how she compares to my beloved Agatha Christie. Having said that much, I was still pleasantly surprised at how much enjoyed reading it.

I loved the all characters: Lord Peter Wimsey, Bunter, detective inspector Parker & the Dowager Duchess of Denver (Lord Peter's mother).

In the beginning, Bunter read very much like Jeeves to Lord Peter's Bertie Wooster:

Lord Peter Wimsey: "It’s much easier to work on someone else’s job than one’s own—gives one that delightful feelin’ of interferin’ and bossin’ about, combined with the glorious sensation that another fellow is takin’ all one’s own work off one’s hands."

Bunter: "Yes, Mr. Graves, it’s a hard life, valeting by day and developing by night—morning tea at any time from 6.30 to 11, and criminal investigation at all hours."

"I’m off. With a taxi I can just—” “Not in those trousers, my lord,” said Mr. Bunter, blocking the way to the door with deferential firmness. “Oh, Bunter,” pleaded his lordship, “do let me—just this once. You don’t know how important it is.” “Not on any account, my lord. It would be as much as my place is worth.”

Their exchanges are funny and a nice comic relief, but as the story continues both characters -along with DI Parker - gather depth. Nothing too elaborately detailed, but rather through some nice little touches you learn that a seemingly flippant, offhand Lord Peter served in WW I and suffered a nervous breakdown due to shell shock from which he never recovered completely. Sometimes he has relapses, especially if his investigations -like here- lead to someone (even though a murderer) losing their life.
We also learn that Bunter served under Lord Peter's command & during his relapses he takes care of him conscientiously & effectively.

Detective Parker seems to be another sidekick to Lord Peter.

“It affords me, if I may say so, the greatest satisfaction,” continued the noble lord, “that in a collaboration like ours all the uninteresting and disagreeable routine work is done by you.”

He is thorough, cautious, clever & well-educated (reminds me a bit of Lt. Arthur Tragg in the Perry Mason series). He likes reading biblical commentary as a chill-out before going to sleep.

One of the most interesting parts of the book was a conversation between Lord Peter & Parker which highlights their characters even more:
“Look here, Peter,” said the other with some earnestness, “suppose you get this playing-fields-of-Eton complex out of your system once and for all. There doesn’t seem to be much doubt that something unpleasant has happened to Sir Reuben Levy. Call it murder, to strengthen the argument. If Sir Reuben has been murdered, is it a game? and is it fair to treat it as a game?” “That’s what I’m ashamed of, really,” said Lord Peter. “It is a game to me, to begin with, and I go on cheerfully, and then I suddenly see that somebody is going to be hurt, and I want to get out of it.” “Yes, yes, I know,” said the detective, “but that’s because you’re thinking about your attitude. You want to be consistent, you want to look pretty, you want to swagger debonairly through a comedy of puppets or else to stalk magnificently through a tragedy of human sorrows and things. But that’s childish. If you’ve any duty to society in the way of finding out the truth about murders, you must do it in any attitude that comes handy. You want to be elegant and detached? That’s all right, if you find the truth out that way, but it hasn’t any value in itself, you know. You want to look dignified and consistent—what’s that got to do with it? You want to hunt down a murderer for the sport of the thing and then shake hands with him and say, ‘Well played—hard luck—you shall have your revenge tomorrow!’ Well, you can’t do it like that. Life’s not a football match. You want to be a sportsman. You can’t be a sportsman. You’re a responsible person.” “I don’t think you ought to read so much theology,” said Lord Peter. “It has a brutalizing influence.”

When finding out who the murderer is, Lord Peter gets also thrown into a moral dilemma that brings on one of his relapses.

You can guess who the perpetrator is relatively quickly. Sayers places her clues inconspicuously, but they can be discovered without much difficulty and yet it does not really diminish the merits of the book. It stays enjoyable from beginning to end.
Bundis
The dialogue of sir wimsey is definitely a hardship on more casual readers, but I found embracing it to be the best way to enjoy the first 1/4 of the book. He tends to speak in a very flippant manner, almost condescending but jovial in presentation so instead of trying to pick it apart, just roll with his mannerisms and try to imagine yourself as a well to do bloke with time to spare and a penchant for mystery, it becomes quite fun actually. Somewhere along the middle of the book things really pick up pace and the language becomes much clearer and easier to follow. Its not a perfect story by any means but think of this particular insert as the foundation for something grand and enchanting, you will definitely be reading more of sir wimsey I'm sure. If you are more inclined to the fast paced modern era of mystery/who-done-its, you might be better off steering clear of this one until you've steeled yourself against the inevitable hardship of breaking through this stories rough outer shell, but once you do, the juicy meats will keep you enticed until the later installments and by then you'll be hooked.
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