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eBook Naomi's Room ePub

by Jonathan Aycliffe

eBook Naomi's Room ePub
Author: Jonathan Aycliffe
Language: English
ISBN: 0586214364
ISBN13: 978-0586214367
Publisher: Grafton; New Ed edition (1992)
Pages: 192
Subcategory: Thriller
Rating: 4.6
Votes: 376
Formats: lrf mbr txt mobi
ePub file: 1294 kb
Fb2 file: 1963 kb

Daddy and Daughter go on a little day Naomi's Room - Jonathan Aycliffe

Charles and Laura are a young, happily married couple inhabiting the. Daddy and Daughter go on a little day Naomi's Room - Jonathan Aycliffe. I am first of all going to say a massive thank you to our Johann (s89) for me losing quite a few hours of sleep because of this book!. The story is a simple one and right from the very start we are thrown into the heart break of a young couple who are getting ready for the Christmas festivities.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Tormented by grief after his four-year-old daughter is murdered, Charles hears sinister whispers as he tries to discover the truth about Naomi's death. But long-buried secrets threaten to take Charles to a place where he could lose his very soul. Aycliffe is a pseudonym for Daniel Easterman.

Constable & Robinson Ltd. 55–56 Russell Square. Naomi would stand for what seemed like hours watching reflections of the room in a large silver ball that turned slowly on the lowest branch. One night she fell asleep at the foot of the tree, a piece of blue ribbon clutched tightly in her hand. On the radio, carols were playing.

In Tibet, they cut them into tiny pieces with butcher’s knives and pound flesh and bones together so that vultures may gorge themselves on the remains. That is known as sky burial. That is known as sky burial sees take them to a high place, a tower of silence, where they are exposed until eaten. We do things differently here. We are civilized, we put our dead in boxes, nail them to their deaths, lower them into deep holes in the ground.

by Jonathan Aycliffe. Jonathan Aycliffe . Daniel Easterman relies on a common theme in many of his ghostly novels, . child abuse taken to the grave and beyond. com User, November 25, 2003. This is the most amazing book I've ever read.

On Christmas Eve morning, Charles sets off with Naomi on a shopping trip to London.

A chilling story' - Independent. Charles and Laura live a sheltered, gilded life in the the privileged world of Cambridge academia: young and in love, their marriage is blessed by a wonderful child - Naomi. On Christmas Eve morning, Charles sets off with Naomi on a shopping trip to London.

Charles and Laura are a young, happily married couple inhabiting the privileged world of Cambridge academia. Brimming with excitement, Charles sets off with his daughter Naomi on a Christmas Eve shopping trip to London. But, by the end of the day, all Charles and his wife have left are cups of tea and police sympathy. For Naomi, their beautiful, angelic only child, has disappeared. Days later her murdered body is discovered

Naomi's Room is a 1991 horror novel by Northern Irish author Jonathan Aycliffe, described by the Newcastle Evening Chronicle as being "among the finest of English ghost stories". It has been optioned for film in Hollywood

Naomi's Room is a 1991 horror novel by Northern Irish author Jonathan Aycliffe, described by the Newcastle Evening Chronicle as being "among the finest of English ghost stories". It has been optioned for film in Hollywood. Pembroke College academic Charles Hillenbrand looks back on his life and his marriage to Laura, who gave up her job at the Fitzwilliam Museum on the birth of their daughter Naomi

Gir
Denis McEoin a.k.a. Jonathan Aycliffe a.k.a. Daniel Easterman relies on a common theme in many of his ghostly novels, i.e. child abuse taken to the grave and beyond. "Naomi's Room" (1991) and the author's later novel, "The Vanishment" (1993) both expand on this theme and both have first-person narrators who may or may not be involved in foul deeds themselves.

Jonathan Aycliffe keeps cranking out the supernatural shocks in "Naomi's Room." Even though I could sometimes guess what was coming, I had put down this book several times and tell myself, "It's only fiction," before I could keep on reading. A couple of really bad scenes:

* The narrator is awakened by the thump-thump of something being dragged into the attic, and realizes that his wife is no longer in bed with him.

* A news photographer shows the narrator photographs of his house in Cambridge. Yeah, there are ghosts peering out of the attic, but also the narrator's wife who he knows was not in Cambridge at the time.

There is a great deal of foreshadowing in this novel, which is to be expected since the narrator is telling his story many years after it took place. In spite of all of the hints that the author drops, the book's ending is still a shock. We know that he wakes up in the darkness, night after night, hearing noises, sometimes seeing horrors that he only hints at. Why does he stay in the house? Is love or guilt chaining him to the house where so many macabre deeds were performed?

Aycliffe brings in one character toward the end of the novel that I don't think he really needed--if he's already driving the plot forward through the actions of evil ghosts, why drag in evil men? Also the narrator's attempts to sidetrack the police by leaving fingerprints about from a few detached fingers he happens to have in his possession didn't strike me as something that would fool a CID man for very long.

In spite of the questionable fingerprints and maybe an extra character or two, "Naomi's Room" is a very haunting story. If a movie is ever made of it, I don't think I could nerve myself to watch it, even in company with a theatre-full of other people.
Umdwyn
Definitely a creepy page turner. One of the scarier books I've read in some time, with an ending that will surprise you. It's also a quick read (a few hours) if you're in the mood for a haunted house story.
Delagamand
Denis McEoin a.k.a. Jonathan Aycliffe a.k.a. Daniel Easterman relies on a common theme in many of his ghostly novels, i.e. child abuse taken to the grave and beyond. "Naomi's Room" (1991) and the author's later novel, "The Vanishment" (1993) both expand on this theme and both have first-person narrators who may or may not be involved in foul deeds himself.

Jonathan Aycliffe keeps cranking out the supernatural shocks in "Naomi's Room." Even though I could sometimes guess what was coming, I had put down this book several times and tell myself, "It's only fiction," before I could keep on reading. A couple of really bad scenes:

* The narrator is awakened by the thump-thump of something being dragged into the attic, and realizes that his wife is no longer in bed with him.

* A news photographer shows the narrator photographs of his house in Cambridge. Yeah, there are ghosts peering out of the attic, but also the narrator's wife who he knows was not in Cambridge at the time.

There is a great deal of foreshadowing in this novel, which is to be expected since the narrator is telling his story many years after it took place. In spite of all of the hints that the author drops, the book's ending is still a shock. We know that he wakes up in the darkness, night after night, hearing noises, sometimes seeing horrors that he only hints at. Why does he stay in the house? Is love or guilt chaining him to the house where so many macabre deeds were performed?

Aycliffe brings in one character toward the end of the novel that I don't think he really needed--if he's already driving the plot forward through the actions of evil ghosts, why drag in evil men? Also the narrator's attempts to sidetrack the police by leaving fingerprints about from a few detached fingers he happens to have in his possession didn't strike me as something that would fool a CID man for very long.

In spite of the questionable fingerprints and maybe an extra character or two, "Naomi's Room" is a very haunting story. If a movie is ever made of it, I don't think I could nerve myself up to watch it, even in company with a theatre-full of other people.
Giamah
I loved this book, it was pretty terrifying and kept me captivated. The ending was not as I would have expected and was not as scary as i would have liked but overall I really liked this book
Gold as Heart
Double lock the doors and windows, and keep several lights burning all night long. Jonathan Aycliffe (aka Daniel Easterman) has written the most frightening book you'll probably ever read. Without a doubt a classic. It's brief, precise, and moves like a runaway freight train to its climax. Awesome.
olgasmile
I've read at least a 1000 horror novels in the last 20 years. Very few have matched the dread and absolute terror this one instilled in me.
Thordigda
What a disappointment. I read this because of all the great reviews and I didn't even want to finish it. It was gettng increasingly silly and predictable and then with about 35 pages left to go, I just skimmed it. The twist is pretty obvious, I knew that would be it on about page one. The early parts of the book did have some good scares, genuinely creepy stuff but it really unravels at the end. Also, I know horror books can be OTT but really this one seemed bent more on disturbing you and grossing you out than scaring you. I've been on a horror book spree or a little while and the Haunting of Hill House was the only one that really seems to me what a haunted house book should be. This one was just too disturbing and not in a fun way. I threw it out as I'm not reading it again and my husband would be disgusted with it.
Book is well written, scary and sad. Author does a great job at making one feel what the protagonist is feeling, not an easy read because it overwhelms one with deep feelings
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