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eBook Warburg in Rome ePub

by James Carroll

eBook Warburg in Rome ePub
Author: James Carroll
Language: English
ISBN: 0547738900
ISBN13: 978-0547738901
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (July 1, 2014)
Pages: 384
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Subcategory: Thriller
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 735
Formats: lrf docx rtf mbr
ePub file: 1287 kb
Fb2 file: 1799 kb

For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to Permissions, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 215 Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10003. Warburg in Rome, James Carroll. pages cm. ISBN 978-0-547-73890-1 (hardback).

Here he combines fact and fiction in a historical thriller.

Электронная книга "Warburg in Rome: A Novel", James Carroll. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Warburg in Rome: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Warburg in Rome book. From the author of the New York Times best-selling Constantine's. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Reds, he thought, fucking Reds. He knew a bomb when he heard one, and his first assumption was-headquarters. His cognac-induced bleariness was instantly replaced by a concentration of senses. the satin sheets aside and, stark naked, went to the half-open floor-to-ceiling window, where filigreed curtains wafted in the warm night air. Behind him, his pretend contessa snatched at the sheets as if they offered cover from whatever was about to fall

David Warburg, newly minted director of the US War Refugee Board, arrives in Rome at war’s end, determined to bring aid to the destitute European Jews streaming into the city.

David Warburg, newly minted director of the US War Refugee Board, arrives in Rome at war’s end, determined to bring aid to the destitute European Jews streaming into the city. Marguerite d’Erasmo, a French-Italian Red Cross worker with a shadowed past, is initially Warburg’s guide-while a charismatic young American Catholic priest, Monsignor Kevin Deane, seems equally committed to aiding Italian Jews. But the city is a labyrinth of desperate fugitives: runaway Nazis, Jewish resisters, and criminal Church figures. Marguerite, caught between justice and revenge, is forced to play a double game.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014. I n Warburg in Rome, award-winning author James Carroll delves into the role of the Vatican and of the United States in saving European Jewish survivors. David Warburg arrives in Rome as the director of the United States War Refugee Board. His mission intertwines with that of Marguerite D’Erasmo, a French-Italian Red Cross worker, and Monsignor Kevin Deane, an American Catholic priest. They are all committed to aiding the Jews in their own way, but Vatican, American, British, and German politics interfere and overwhelm their efforts.

David Warburg, newly minted director of the . War Refugee Board, arrives in Rome at war's end, determined to bring aid to the destitute European Jews streaming into the city

David Warburg, newly minted director of the . War Refugee Board, arrives in Rome at war's end, determined to bring aid to the destitute European Jews streaming into the city. Marguerite d'Erasmo, a French-Italian Red Cross worker with a shadowed past, is initially Warburg's guide to a complicated Rome; while a charismatic young American Catholic priest, Monsignor Kevin Deane, seems equally committed to aiding Italian Jews.

David Doersch, James Carroll. David Warburg, newly minted director of the . Marguerite d'Erasmo, a French-Italian Red Cross worker with a shadowed past, is initially Warburg's guide to a complicated Rome; while a charismatic young American Catholic priest, Monsignor Kevin Deane, seems equally committed to aiding Italian Jews

David Warburg, newly minted director of the U.S. War Refugee Board, arrives in Rome at war’s end, determined to bring aid to the destitute European Jews streaming into the city. Marguerite d’Erasmo, a French-Italian Red Cross worker with a shadowed past, is initially Warburg’s guide to a complicated Rome; while a charismatic young American Catholic priest, Monsignor Kevin Deane, seems equally committed to aiding Italian Jews. But the city is a labyrinth of desperate fugitives, runaway Nazis, Jewish resisters, and criminal Church figures. Marguerite, caught between justice and revenge, is forced to play a double game. At the center of the maze, Warburg discovers one of history’s great scandals—the Vatican ratline, a clandestine escape route maintained by Church officials and providing scores of Nazi war criminals with secret passage to Argentina. Warburg’s disillusionment is complete when, turning to American intelligence officials, he learns that the dark secret is not so secret, and that even those he trusts may betray him.

James Carroll delivers an authoritative, stirring novel that reckons powerfully with the postwar complexities of good and evil in the Eternal City.

heart of sky
How unfortunate that we've had so many wars in the last half of the twentieth century. Don't all those belligerent folks realize we haven't yet had time to thoroughly analyze all the nuances of World War II? There's no time to follow the distractions of more recent conflicts. Can't we all just get along for, say, the next hundred years, in order to focus our full attention on the big one?

World War II was the "good war." But the more I read about it, the more I wonder just how good it actually was. Lots of killing, of course, but that's always the down side of any conflict. After reading dozens (hundreds?) of tomes on the political, diplomatic, and social aspects of the war, I don't seem any closer to finding out who the good guys really were. Of course the Allied cause was just, but after the horrors of the Holocaust the Brits battled to keep the Jews out of Palestine. Meanwhile, Americans paved the way for certain Nazis to emigrate to the U.S., provided they helped us develop ever more destructive weapons. And how many Jews did we allow to emigrate to the U.S. during the war - one boat load? On the other hand, the Catholic church was pure as the driven snow - Nazis to Argentina, for example. Partisans good? Well, how about those who turned out to be Communists?

Since the author, James Carroll, left the Catholic priesthood in disgust, I was certain he would have a totally unbiased view of the church's role in the war. Surprisingly he seemed at least partially unbiased. Pope Pius XII a Nazi? Well, no, but I hoped for a definitive view on the Pope's role in the war and postwar periods. I want to get all these folks lined up as either black or white hats. No such luck. Indeed, the church did provide assistance to the Nazis during the war, but the idea was to help them crush the Communists. Just say no to Soviet control of the Eastern European nations, especially since they were primarily Catholic.

"Warburg in Rome" is a fascinating book. It takes a slice of World War II, then mixes fictional characters into a real-time scenario - Rome during and immediately after the war, the question of European refugees (mostly Jewish?), role of the church, U.S. interests, postwar chaos - even Cardinal Spellman makes a cameo appearance. The major characters - Warburg, Marguerite D'Erasmo, Monsignor Kevin Deane, Colonel Peter Mates - represent competing/cooperating elements in the mixture. Bordered on five stars, but some of the major characters weren't sufficiently developed - although the political/diplomatic angles were well covered.
Hamrl
James Carroll's book illuminates one of the darkest periods in modern history. The cynicism and denial that were implicit in the way that European Jewish survivors were treated in the years after the end of the war are ALMOST beyond belief. I found myself pausing while reading Warburg in Rome to verify certain historical events and found that the author put his fictitious characters in a milieu that was all too accurately portrayed. And then I happened to read Deborah E. Lipstadt's recent op-ed in the NYT entitled WHY JEWS ARE WORRIED. It provided a disturbing coda to this outstanding book. This is a very readable and accurate novel, I hope it gets the wide audience it deserves.
Biaemi
Thoroughly enjoyed the book, but to be honest, James Carroll is one of my favorite authors. My reading habits are eclectic in that
I read a wide mix of fiction and non fiction with a bit of focus on history. The Boston Globe reviewer commented that if Carroll had wanted to write a history book he should have done so rather than trying to bury history lessons in fiction or in supposed discussions or arguments between characters. To me, the point of good historical fiction is that the author stays close to the facts of history and then attempts to impart how these facts of history may have impacted the actions and feelings of people through the creation of hi/her characters. James Carroll did that in this book. A side note to my pleasure in the book comes from the fact that he did mention the Safe Haven established in Oswego, NY. The creation of this Haven was a too little done a little too late, but it was the only ever done to my knowledge anyplace at any time. I wasn't even born at the time but it is a part of the history of the city in which I was born. There is a museum there now dedicated to that history that is small quite excellent.
Kerdana
This is an important book...not as a result of its literary value, rather because it tells an important story, gleaned from a large number of references. It tells a terrible tale of the Catholic Church during and immediately after WW II, when the Church was passionately crazy about the godless Russian heathens and preferred the Nazis. The "Holiness" Pope Pius XII was "above it all" but
steely in supporting the Aussweg, the German name for their safe path out of Europe and into South America..

Interwoven within this, the Author puts in some characters who fight the losing battle against the stalwarts of the Church.
Gogal
This was so good that I read it twice. The description of Rome at the end of WWII, the scenes at the Vatican and the characters were excellent. I knew some of what the Vatican did to help Nazi criminals escape to Argentina, but the extent of the entire network was astonishing. The Croatian Nazis came as a shock to me - I had thought mostly of Germans. I am a Catholic and felt ashamed of the evil perpetrated by the church. I was glad that Carroll documented the good work of Bishop Roncalli, our late Pope John XXIII, in Budapest. I have read most of James Carroll's work and appreciate that he decided to write about this period of history.
Zeks Horde
This is a well researched book that touches the delicacies and complexities of the last days of World War II in Rome and in the Catholic Church. Carroll superbly captures the human and moral ambiguities faced by the characters in his novel. As I finished it, I could not help seeing the reverberations into today's world conflicts, especially in the Middle East.
Bolanim
Great read, pulls you back to the era.
A great historical fiction novel. I found myself going to google to research the Italian and Croation camps. The books went into detail about the rat line escape routes, and the use of Nazi war criminals by the United States in research and as a counterbalance to The Soviet Union in the cold war. James Carroll is a former priest and explains the role of the Vatican during and after the war. Good read which will hold your interest.
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