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eBook The Svalbard Passage: A Novel ePub

by Thomas Kirkwood

eBook The Svalbard Passage: A Novel ePub
Author: Thomas Kirkwood
Language: English
ISBN: 0025635603
ISBN13: 978-0025635609
Publisher: Macmillan Pub Co; 1st edition (September 1, 1981)
Pages: 307
Category: Thrillers & Suspense
Subcategory: Thriller
Rating: 4.2
Votes: 612
Formats: docx doc lit lrf
ePub file: 1689 kb
Fb2 file: 1237 kb

The Svalbard Passage book.

The Svalbard Passage book. This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923  . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Svalbard Passage: A Novel.

The Svalbard Passage by Thomas Kirkwood is a tense thriller set in the US, Norway and Svalbard during the Cold Wa. .The Solitude Of Thomas Cave, by Georgina Harding, is a novel about a sailor who bets his shipmates that he can overwinter in Svalbard

The Svalbard Passage by Thomas Kirkwood is a tense thriller set in the US, Norway and Svalbard during the Cold Wa.The Solitude Of Thomas Cave, by Georgina Harding, is a novel about a sailor who bets his shipmates that he can overwinter in Svalbard

Thomas Kirkwood, Novelist, Salida, Colorado.

Thomas Kirkwood, Novelist, Salida, Colorado. Thomas Kirkwood, Novelist. 25 February 2014 ·. The Svalbard Passage is a rare work of fiction: the power and dramatic intensity of the writing are matched by the authenticity of the writers' extraordinary knowledge of political reality; the result is a work of imagination and prophecy. Readers of John Le Carré, Richard Condon, Ken Follett, and Robert Ludlum will find it irresistible.

The Svalbard Passage is a masterful novel set in the US and Norway

The Svalbard Passage is a masterful novel set in the US and Norway. The intensity of the story, combined with the authors' knowledge of political reality, result in one of the best Cold War novels ever written. Readers of LeCarre, Follet, Condon and Ludlum will find it irresistible. Tense drama spectacular"-St. Louis Post Dispatch "Riveting and fascinating. -Lerner Newspapers "An absorbing tale the stuff of which movies are made. -Rocky Mountain News.

Through the weave of this richly atmospheric novel of suspense runs the stormy, sensual love story of Martin and Ulrike, lovers who come to maturity in the face of annihilation. Tense dram. pectacular. Riveting and fascinating. An absorbing tal. he stuff of which movies are made. Crackle. rousing good jo. -Akron Beacon-Journal.

See what Thomas Kirkwood (thomas kirkwood) has discovered on.Novels – Unique Thrillers by Thomas Kirkwood. What others are saying.

See what Thomas Kirkwood (thomas kirkwood) has discovered on Pinterest, the world's biggest collection of ideas.

Neige Noir ("Black Snow") is a 1974 novel by Canadian author Hubert Aquin about a newly married Montreal couple who travel to Svalbard. The Svalbard Passage by Thomas Kirkwood is a thriller set in the US, Norway and Svalbard during the Cold Wa.The Solitude Of Thomas Cave, by Georgina Harding, is a novel about a sailor who spends a whole winter in Svalbard

This is quite a good adventure/espionage novel. Nothing stunning here though.

This is quite a good adventure/espionage novel. We have Cold War adversaries, an interesting setting, a love story in the middle of the confrontation, and small, but exceptional, people making a different in geopolitical matters. Not sure how popular this book was in the day, but I see copies from time to time. Interest in Svalbard got me to read the book.

Informationen zum Titel The Svalbard Passage: A Novel von Thomas Kirkwood [mit Kurzbeschreibung und . The Svalbard Passage is a masterful novel set in the US and Norway.

Informationen zum Titel The Svalbard Passage: A Novel von Thomas Kirkwood The Svalbard Passage is a masterful novel set in the US and Norway. The intensity of the story, combined with the authors’ knowledge of political reality, result in one of the best Cold War novels ever written.

Though The Passage is a different sort of book, Cronin hasn’t lost his skill for creating deeply moving character portraits. The author of two previous novels, Cronin, in his third book, imagines the catastrophic possibilities of a vampiric bat virus unleashed upon the world

Though The Passage is a different sort of book, Cronin hasn’t lost his skill for creating deeply moving character portraits. Throughout, in moments both large and small, readers will find the kind of complicated and heartfelt relationships that Cronin has made his specialty. Though the cast of characters is large, they are never mere pawns. The author of two previous novels, Cronin, in his third book, imagines the catastrophic possibilities of a vampiric bat virus unleashed upon the world. Discovered by the . Military in South America, the virus is transported to a laboratory in the Colorado mountains where it is engineered to create a more invincible soldier.

A frightening confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union over a remote waterway between Norway and the Arctic Circle threatens to plunge the world into the ultimate conflict
Via
Cold war thrillers are one of my guilty pleasures and I was expecting a little-known gem after reading the other reviews. But this book was somewhat of a disappointment.

The dialogue seems forced and even stilted. For example, several Americans are asked to join a trip. After one accepts, another says, "I, also, of course." Now, have you ever heard an American say "I, also" instead of "me, too"?

The lead female character is also a problem. Almost none of her actions or dialogue rang true for me. She seemed liked nothing more than a clumsy device to move the plot along. If the plot required a tantrum, she threw a tantrum. What's worse, for a thriller, this book wasn't very, well, thrilling. The first half of the book seemed to drag, although it did pick up in the second half.

SEMI-SPOILER ALERT: I also disliked the ending, or should I say, the non-ending. When you stick with an author (or in this case, authors) for 307 pages, you deserve some sort of payoff.
Paxondano
This is quite a good adventure/espionage novel. Nothing stunning here though. We have Cold War adversaries, an interesting setting, a love story in the middle of the confrontation, and small, but exceptional, people making a different in geopolitical matters.

Not sure how popular this book was in the day, but I see copies from time to time. Interest in Svalbard got me to read the book. It's a quick read, good for the train or airplane.
Gom
This book to my thinking does something revolutionary: it synthesizes the best of British, American and European fiction. Perhaps this is because it has two authors, one European and the other American. Before I get into the book, let me give you an idea what I mean. British spy novels are often very well written and most amusing. But they are so British and so quirky that if you haven't spend a great deal of time in England, you will be reading a lot of things that seem a bit meaningless. European fiction is always well written, but it tends to be so deep and demanding of the reader that when you are tired and in need of entertainment, you often feel as if you are being asked to take part in a mental iron-man competition. Then there's American thriller fiction. It's certainly entertaining in the sense that you keep turning the pages. But the bestselling authors I've read are appallingly bad writers, the stories are contrived and banal, the characters are cardboard vehicles for the action, the plots follow a predictable formula and you finish the book wishing you had done the iron-man thing after all. Here's where the Svalbard Passage is different. You keep on turning the pages, you're never bored or forced to think too hard when you wish to relax. Yet when you finish you realize you've been taken on an incredible journey - and I mean, in every sense. This novel is like Thirteen Days in that it gives you a glimpse into the way politics really is. It's fiction, of course. There are Norwegian and American officials that avoid the stereotypes, there is an American professor and an obstinate but beautiful German journalist, there are two Russian characters whose descriptions are on a par with those done by the best British authors and there's the spectacular scenery of Svalbard. I, as a Norwegian, know this part of the world well, as do the authors. But most incredible is the story. It has the entertainment quality of an American thriller, the fine writing and unforgettable if quirky descriptiveness of an English story and the real-life depth (no predictable formulas here) of a work of European literature. You can't do a whole lot better than this. I commend the authors and urge you to read the novel. It's an experience you won't soon forget.
Roram
I'll admit it. I'm a true Kirkwood fan. This is another of his well-crafted taut thrillers. You're right there, smelling the sharp pine scent of the forest and feeling the cold wind buffeting you. I've put seeing the fjiords on my travel list after reading this book and immersing myself in this locale. It's tightly written, keeps the reader engaged, and makes me want more from Tom Kirkwood.
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