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eBook Finn ePub

by Jon Clinch

eBook Finn ePub
Author: Jon Clinch
Language: English
ISBN: 0739484591
ISBN13: 978-0739484593
Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (2007)
Subcategory: No category
Rating: 4.8
Votes: 193
Formats: doc mbr rtf mobi
ePub file: 1645 kb
Fb2 file: 1455 kb

Wow. What an incredible feat Jon Clinch pulled off, especially for a first-time novelist.

Wow. It’s not often I run across prose as lovely and powerful as this. Clinch provides the reader with a startling portrait of a despicable human being and the influences that made Finn so. Flashback's to Finn's youth and dark nuances about possible abuse, physical and emotional, cause one to imagine what might have been had he had a normal upbringing. Clinch gives the reader a glimpse of that lost humanity when Finn rescues the young Mary, the girl who would become Huck's mother, from men who were about to abuse her.

Jon Clinch’s first novel, Finn-the secret history of Huckleberry Finn’s father-was named an American Library Association Notable Book and was chosen as . .See if your friends have read any of Jon Clinch's books. Jon Clinch’s Followers (218).

Finn" sets a tragic figure loose in a landscape at once familiar and mythic

Finn" sets a tragic figure loose in a landscape at once familiar and mythic. It begins and ends with a lifeless body-flayed and stripped of all identifying marks-drifting down the Mississippi. The circumstances of the murder, and the secret of the victim's identity, shape Finn's story as they will shape his life and his death

This is the official page for Jon Clinch, author of MARLEY, FINN, and KINGS OF THE EARTH. Jon Clinch’s new novel, Marley, is a noirish prequel to A Christmas Carol, revealing just how Scrooge became, well, Scrooge.

This is the official page for Jon Clinch, author of MARLEY, FINN, and KINGS OF THE EARTH.

Here comes Mr. Jon Clinch, 123 years later, to finally help us probe beneath Pap’s surface charm - his alcohol-soaked destitution; his petty thievery; his hatred of.It is not simply Clinch’s appropriation of Finn that vexes Finn

Here comes Mr. Jon Clinch, 123 years later, to finally help us probe beneath Pap’s surface charm - his alcohol-soaked destitution; his petty thievery; his hatred of Negroes; his coercive, violent, money-leeching treatment of his son, Huck - and discover, let’s face it, that the man had issues. By Page 5 of Finn, the title character is barbecuing strips of expertly flayed meat on the deep-woods campfire of a blind bootlegger. It is not simply Clinch’s appropriation of Finn that vexes Finn. Reimagining a great work of literature, or characters in it, can produce dazzling triumphs of illumination, as Tom Stoppard and others have demonstrated.

The floor slants alarmingly downward to his left where the Wallace P. Greene swept one of the pilings away, and already certain flotsam has begun to accumulate in that far corner by the entry to the. Bottles mainly but also clothing and trash and scraps of paper and something alive that rustles invisibly there even as he looks and listens. To his right is the door to the bedroom stairs, hanging open in a frame abristle with pulled nails that sprout like so many teeth.

Jon Clinch is an American novelist. Originally from upstate Oneida, New York, he graduated from Syracuse University and went on to teach American literature. Formerly creative director for various advertising agencies in the Philadelphia area, he now lives in Vermont. He has written stories which have been published in MSS magazine

Jon Clinch’s first novel Finn. the eloquence of the telling will never make the courageous reader wish for a gentler touch.

Jon Clinch’s first novel Finn.

Finn Clinch, Jon Random House (USA) 9780812977141 Финн : In this masterful debut by a major new voice in fiction, Jon Clinch takes us on a journey into the history and heart of one of American l.

Finn Clinch, Jon Random House (USA) 9780812977141 Финн : In this masterful debut by a major new voice in fiction, Jon Clinch takes us on a journey into the history and heart of one of American . Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 27 сен 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: конец октября - начало ноября При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Freaky Hook
Finn. Wow. What an incredible feat Jon Clinch pulled off, especially for a first-time novelist. I loved this book. It’s not often I run across prose as lovely and powerful as this.

Mark Twain’s works are sacred to me, yet in spite of the few surprises Clinch dealt, I took no offense at his playing in Twain’s venerable sandbox; in fact I found it quite enjoyable to ride along as he assembled the backstory of Huck’s Pap, and filled in some missing bits of timeline from Twain’s novel without subverting the continuity already established therein. An amazing accomplishment, as was the way Clinch managed to make me root for a protagonist as loathsome and despicable as they come.

There were many times when I just had to stop and admire a particularly wonderful sentence, and not without more than a dash of envy. Check these out:

"As he chews, methodical as some old ruminant, these baked-black berries beneath the latticework of their pale and tender crust speak also of innocence undisturbed, of childhoods spent around tables like this and around others less elevated and bountiful, of secrets buried beneath time and earth and flowing water …"

"Huck laughs as only a boy can, illuminating the river valley with an arc of sound that bends across the water like a handful of thrown coins."

"… and even in the forced absence of whiskey a vision passes before his eyes unbidden not of snakes nor of spiders but of the turgid Mississippi beneath his window on the Illinois side crossed and recrossed with a cumulative ghostly weavework of fishing boats’ accidental paths and steamboats’ cautious trajectories achurn with white foam beneath which and supporting all lies dark water and darker history."

Damn, I wish I’d written those gems.

I have a few quibbles such as his extremely sparing use of commas resulting in long run-on sentences that can be interpreted in different ways depending on where one’s mind supplies the beats the pauses the missing punctuation and serving mainly to.

Stop. I’m starting to write like him. But that brings up another quibble, his refusal to use the simple yet eloquent em-dash to represent the end of a sentence that has been cut off, and use of a period instead, which signifies an entirely different inflection.

Since Mr. Clinch is obviously well-versed in English, I assume that both of these were conscious stylistic decisions on his part, and I respect that, but still. A bit off-putting at times.

However, you’ll notice that I still gave the book five stars, and that’s because neither of these complaints detracted from the beautiful, evocative prose that made this book an absolute joy to read.

Nor was I bothered by his use of alternating timelines, one leading up to the murder of Mary and one following it, both advancing side-by-side at an equal pace. Some readers have said they found this difficult to follow; and it is. But to me, that’s part of the attraction of the book. I found it a pleasurable mental exercise to piece together the entire chronology as it was revealed a slice at a time. (Those who know me might not find this surprising, as it’s a literary trick I've used myself.)

As dark and harrowing as it was to witness Finn’s descent into alcoholism and depravity, it was at the same time totally captivating. This is the best book I’ve read in quite some time.
Naril
A best-selling author once told me, "It's okay to steal an idea as long as you make it better." I agree, but in this instance, I think Mr. Clinch comes up well short of the 'idea' Mark Twain planted in his classic novels about Huck Finn and life on the Mississippi. Kudos to Mr. Clinch for making the effort. He had the courage and was willing to take the risk. The concept was interesting, but the story did not involve me like Mr. Twain's.

Over a decade ago, Laura Kalpakian wrote a sequel, "Cosette" to Victor Hugo's masterpiece, "Les Miserables." I enjoyed it immensely. Her characters and her story line flowed smoothly from Hugo's work into hers. Such was not the case in "Finn." I never quite felt the revulsion I think I should have from the main character. Young Huck gets lost in the pages. I missed the story and couldn't quite come to grips with the fact that this disreputable character was the son of a judge and whose brother is an attorney. Where did Finn go wrong? Was it simply his love of whiskey? I missed it whatever it was.

I would not recommend that you go out of your way to read this book. If you are stuck in an airport, have a go at it, but I think there are too many other good books out there to read.
Ucantia
Clinch's consistent, unique style is definitely not for the sleepy reader, but lends itself beautifully to the era and become more and more comfortable as the story goes forward. All the pieces exist to explain Finn's constitution, but very little is obviously stated, making this book a refreshingly challenging read that pays off in spades.
Tetaian
I just don't think that Mark Twain would give it a thumbs up. Just overly bloody, sexual, off track, but most of all, not very well written. Sorry.
I really could not recommend this book. Enjoy the original Huckleberry Finn and forget the sequel.
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