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eBook Cosm. ePub

by Gregory Benford

eBook Cosm. ePub
Author: Gregory Benford
Language: German
ISBN: 3453170873
ISBN13: 978-3453170872
Publisher: Heyne (April 1, 2000)
Subcategory: No category
Rating: 4.7
Votes: 124
Formats: docx mobi lrf docx
ePub file: 1978 kb
Fb2 file: 1795 kb

For iBookstore: iBOOKS For Kobo: KOBO And for all e-book formats: SMASHWORDS.

For iBookstore: iBOOKS For Kobo: KOBO And for all e-book formats: SMASHWORDS. Journey to the genre’s core.

What happened to all of Gregory’s books? We moved them. We created a whole new book section since your last visit. For iBookstore: iBOOKS For Kobo: KOBO And for all e-book formats: SMASHWORDS. An old fan humor piece.

Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy is one of the high-water marks of science fiction. It is the monumental story of a Galactic Empire in decline, and the secret society of scientists who seek to shorten the inevitable Dark Age with the science of psychohistory

Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy is one of the high-water marks of science fiction. It is the monumental story of a Galactic Empire in decline, and the secret society of scientists who seek to shorten the inevitable Dark Age with the science of psychohistory. Now, with the permission - and blessing - of the Asimov estate, the epic saga continues. Fate - and a cruel Emperor's arbitrary power - have thrust Hari Seldon into the First Ministership of the Empire against his will

Gregory Benford, Nebula Award-Winning Science Fiction author, books for hard Sci-Fi fans and Y.

Gregory Benford, Nebula Award-Winning Science Fiction author, books for hard Sci-Fi fans and Y.

Gregory Benford (born January 30, 1941) is an American science fiction author and astrophysicist who is Professor Emeritus at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine. Benford wrote the Galactic Center Saga science fiction novels, beginning with In the Ocean of Night (1977). The series postulates a galaxy in which sentient organic life is in constant warfare with sentient electromechanical life.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. It will soon be seen as a significant historical breakthrough. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied.

Gregory Benford is an American science fiction author and astrophysicist who is on the faculty of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Universi. See if your friends have read any of Gregory Benford's books. Gregory Benford’s Followers (406). More follower. regory Benford.

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It’s 1998, and a physicist in Cambridge, England, attempts to send a message backward in time. Earth is falling apart, and a government faction supports the project in hopes of diverting or avoiding the environmental disasters beginning to tear at the edges of civilization. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Gregory Benford has done much better (notably with Timescapes). I found his attempt to construct a believable African-American female academic physicist to be very disappointing. I also found the story to be too clever.

Karon
I'm sure that it's a perfectly good book, but unfortunately it's in German, and I don't speak or read German. Must have missed that when I ordered it.
Windforge
Benford's Cosm has exactly one thing going for it: it's the first (as far as I know) fictional treatment of the idea, from speculative cosmology, that universes might "reproduce", by budding off little "daughter" universes. People have (inevitably) taken off from there, to the idea that universes might "evolve" over time, be subject to some analog of natural selection, and so on, and that this might even help explain why this universe has properties that enabled it to give rise to us. I think this idea is wrong and/or incoherent in various ways, but it's still interesting, and might eventually lead to something firmer.
Unfortunately, this idea has a role in only a tiny fraction of Cosm, and the rest of the book has nothing to recommend it, and quite alot to make me wince.
Much of the book is about the personal life of the protagonist, a black female physicist and professor. This would be good reading if it were unusually well-written, or gave interesting insights into what it might be like to be that person, or described an unusually interesting life, or if it were written by someone in a similar position who had real-life experiences to relate to. But the prose is pedestrian, there are no particular insights, the character's life isn't very interesting outside of the immediate plot, and Benford is not a black female physicist. The conflicts in the book are superficial, the emotions are simple, and the love story is completely straightforward.
Benford is a professor of physics. But the parts of the book that might have given interesting insights into that life have been contorted in unconvincing ways by the demands of the plot. The protagonist is an untenured junior professor; but when she discovers an object with the obvious potential to revolutionize the entire field from particle physics to cosmology, her University is content to leave her in charge of it (because that's necessary to Benford's plot).
In real life, she would certainly have been given a junior courtesy position in the institute that would have been set up to study the object, headed by the most prestigious members of the department and the relevant government agencies. In the book, she and one post-doc are left with sole acccess to it, and she is able (for instance) to forbid important alumni (but not, not quite, the President of the U.S.) from being allowed to see it. The only theoretician she allows near it is one that she randomly encounters (and eventually falls for) at another University.
Now maybe my idea of how university physics departments work is just completely wrong, and Benford's is right. That seems utterly unlikely, though, and Benford does nothing to convince me of it.
Anyway, I could rail on for some time, but it's not really worth it. This book might have made a decent short story, but as a novel it's unremarkable, and not a really good use of time.
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