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eBook Pardon me, you're stepping on my eyeball!: A novel ePub

by Paul Zindel

eBook Pardon me, you're stepping on my eyeball!: A novel ePub
Author: Paul Zindel
Language: English
ISBN: 0060268379
ISBN13: 978-0060268374
Publisher: Harper & Row; 1st edition (1976)
Pages: 262
Subcategory: No category
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 801
Formats: lrf mobi txt azw
ePub file: 1935 kb
Fb2 file: 1948 kb

Pardon Me, You’re Stepping on My Eyeball! is a young adult novel written by Paul Zindel, first published in 1976.

Pardon Me, You’re Stepping on My Eyeball! is a young adult novel written by Paul Zindel, first published in 1976. The novel follows two alienated teenagers in Staten Island, 15-year-old Louis "Marsh" Mellow and Edna Shinglebox, as they cope with their family issues. Edna’s mother is agonized over her daughter's not having a sweetheart while Marsh reveals his father is committed to a psychiatric hospital in Los Angeles.

Paul Zindel, Sr. ran away with his mistress when Zindel was two, leaving . Many of his novels have zany titles, such as My Darling, My Hamburger, Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! or Confessions of a Teenage Baboon

Paul Zindel, Sr. ran away with his mistress when Zindel was two, leaving the trio to move around Staten Island, living in various houses and apartments. Zindel wrote his first play in high school. Zindel wrote a total of 53 books, all but one of them aimed at children or teens. Many were set in his home town of Staten Island. Many of his novels have zany titles, such as My Darling, My Hamburger, Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! or Confessions of a Teenage Baboon. My Darling, My Hamburger" specifically deals with teen sexuality, abuse with the home, teen pregnancy, and abortion. The Pigman, first published in 1968, deals with love and finding friends in odd places.

Similar books to Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! .

Similar books to Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! (Paul Zindel Classic Novels). Obviously the book being full of outdated terms and racist references framed like they're funny is also probably a reflection of some of the norms at the time, but it was still kind of a surprise to me how MANY of these there were when comparing to other books of the era. I felt no investment in the characters' relationships, felt no real understanding of their situations, and read everything with a bad taste in my mouth.

Start by marking Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball as Want to. .One of the major threads in this novel is politics.

Start by marking Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Another is advertising (in fact, the richest living character in the story is in advertising). The parenting is atrocious, but that manifests in obvious ways in the story. I could still say so much more about this book and the message Zindel sends out. The book ends (view spoiler).

Pardon Me, You're Stepping On My Eyeball Mass Market Paperback – August 1, 1993. by. Paul Zindel (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Pardon Me, You’re Stepping on My Eyeball! I Never Loved Your Mind. Loch : a novel, by Paul Zindel. Cavenger says you have photos, sketches of what we’re looking for in the lake, Erdon pressed. The Undertaker’s Gone Bananas. p. cm. Summary: Fifteen-year-old Loch and his younger sister join their. creatures sighted in a Vermont lake, but it soon becomes obvious that. I mean, I’ll be doing the stills and video, but if I could see what you’ve got, it might help me know what to expect. Was it Darwin or Pasteur who said chance favors the mind that’s prepared?

This book kept me laughing, yet it also explores the human mind. Zindel's words flow beautifully, and are spiced with all sorts of quirks

This book kept me laughing, yet it also explores the human mind. An awesome book, which I'd reccomend to anybody who didn't have a fear of strange titles. com User, June 16, 1998. I admit that I am getting a little old for young adult novels I started to read and and couldn't put it down. Zindel's words flow beautifully, and are spiced with all sorts of quirks

Many of his novels have zany titles, such as My Darling, My Hamburger, Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! or Confessions of a Teenage Baboon.

Many of his novels have zany titles, such as My Darling, My Hamburger, Pardon Me, You're Stepping on My Eyeball! or Confessions of a Teenage Baboon.

The novel follows two alienated teenagers in Staten Island, 15-year-old Louis "Marsh" Mellow and Edna Shinglebox, as they cope with their family issues.

Two alienated teenagers learn to cope with their personal problems by being honest with each other.
Sharpbinder
I read this story when I was in junior high school back in the 1970s. Zindel was my favorite writer. As I reread it in 2017 it makes me sad that kids nowadays read all that terribly predictable fanfic online instead of remarkable stories like this one and that's how they are first exposed to concepts of romance. This story deals with the awkwardness of teenage love and the problems of having insane parents and handles these dark subjects with a wry wit that always kept me coming back for more. (I do notice that Zindel really didn't like hippies, which I somehow didn't manage to pick up on when I read his books as a kid; really, though, that's my only problem with him.)
Kieel
I read this book in junior high and again in high school. I read it again now to see how my kids will like it. Just a fantastic book. Its dramatic, creative, original and hysterically funny. A great book for anyone who has suffered a tragedy or for any kid who had a tough time growing up or difficult times in their teenage years.
Memuro
Awesome
Jothris
this book was amazing
Kea
Some readers might find Paul Zindel novels outdated, but really his characters are timeless and wonderfully quirky.
Minnai
Just as described. ????????
Little Devil
Marsh and Edna are two misfits who learn about each other because of shared group therapy at school. Both feeling unsupported at home by their woefully incapable parents, they explore their relationship with lies, mental illness, social interaction, trust, and each other. But when Marsh seems to need more from Edna than she's willing to give on an issue regarding his father, tension reigns between them. Resolution may require drastic measures.

Given the largely positive response this book has in reviews, I'm thinking there must be something I'm not getting about it. To me it felt bizarrely disorganized, with character interactions that made no sense even if you assume that mental illness and substance abuse are figuring in. For the record, some folks in the story are canonically mentally ill, and that would be a great subject to explore if it didn't seem to be a bizarre norm throughout the story that everyone is acting in ways that do not seem to be connected to happenings or interactions, and even taking into account how old the book is, some of the authority figures' behavior in a school setting was alarming and questionable.

Obviously the book being full of outdated terms and racist references framed like they're funny is also probably a reflection of some of the norms at the time, but it was still kind of a surprise to me how MANY of these there were when comparing to other books of the era. I felt no investment in the characters' relationships, felt no real understanding of their situations, and read everything with a bad taste in my mouth.
I've owned this book since 1979 when I was 11 years old. I've gone back and read it multiple times, each time discovering something new as I got older and I just read it again this past weekend. It is really about love and friendship and honesty and overcoming pain and fear. It is about growing up too, and the things teenagers all deal with: trying to fit in, feeling misunderstood, feeling alone, pretending to be someone else in order to be accepted or liked. I love how flawed the two main characters are and yet I fell in love with both of them, especially Marsh, who is hilarious and filled with so much pain.

I do not agree with the publisher's summary of the book. I don't think Marsh believes the world hates him. He hates his life, he hates himself, and he just needs someone like Edna who is overcoming some of the same issues and can help him through it. It's about reaching out and trusting in someone, it is about being honest with yourself, it is about facing reality rather than avoiding it.
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