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eBook So Much for That ePub

by Lionel Shriver

eBook So Much for That ePub
Author: Lionel Shriver
Language: English
ISBN: 0007271077
ISBN13: 978-0007271078
Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS; ePub edition edition (2010)
Subcategory: No category
Rating: 4.1
Votes: 866
Formats: doc mobi lrf rtf
ePub file: 1997 kb
Fb2 file: 1852 kb

Home Lionel Shriver So Much for That. So with an eye to his true purpose-money-Shep had instinctively gravitated to where America kept most of it, and applied to the City College of Technology in New York.

Home Lionel Shriver So Much for That. So much for that, . For while Gabe Knacker faulted the character of his son the philistine for his worship of the false god Mammon, Shep believed fervently that money-the web of your fiscal relationships to individuals and to the world at large-was character; that the surest test of any man’s mettle was how he wielded his wallet.

Lionel Shriver's furious, unflinching new novel opens with Shep Knacker, a disillusioned small businessman, planning to escape to early retirement . Their discontent leaps off the page. So Much For That feels turbo-charged by anger.

Lionel Shriver's furious, unflinching new novel opens with Shep Knacker, a disillusioned small businessman, planning to escape to early retirement on a spice island off the coast of Africa ("He loved the notion of living in a place his spellchecker didn't recognise").

Lionel Shriver has written a very grown-up story that deals with serious subjects in a serious wa.

But his plans hit a snag when his wife, Glynis, is diagnosed with a particularly virulent strain of cancer. So Much For That" is about Shep who has been saving all his life so he can retire early to run away to a place where people bask in the sun and live on a dollar per day and he is now ready to go. And then his wife goes and spoils it all by saying something stupid like 'I have cancer'.

So much for expecting to to read an engaging and enlightening novel about the sad state of health care in America. It was riveting, but I never pursued other Shriver books. Instead I got an irritating polemic presented as a novel. The medical details are not for the squeamish, but the authenticity of the writing and the gut wrenching empathy you feel for the characters is amazing.

Shriver has a gift for creating real and complicated character. highly engrossing novel. San Francisco Chronicle From New York Times bestselling author Lionel Shriver (The Post-Birthday World, We Need to Talk About Kevin), comes a searing, deeply humane novel about a crumbling marriage resurrected in the face of illness, and a family’s struggle to come to terms with disease, dying, and the obscene cost of medical care in modern America. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Lionel Shriver (born Margaret Ann Shriver; May 18, 1957) is an American journalist and author who lives in the United Kingdom. She is best known for her novel We Need to Talk About Kevin, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2005 and was adapted into the 2011 film of the same name, starring Tilda Swinton. Shriver was born Margaret Ann Shriver on May 18, 1957, in Gastonia, North Carolina, to a deeply religious family (her father is a Presbyterian minister)

From New York Times bestselling author Lionel Shriver (The Post-Birthday World, We Need to Talk About Kevin), comes a searing, deeply humane novel about a crumbling . So Much for That - Lionel Shriver.

From New York Times bestselling author Lionel Shriver (The Post-Birthday World, We Need to Talk About Kevin), comes a searing, deeply humane novel about a crumbling marriage resurrected in the face of illness, and a family’s struggle to come to terms with disease, dying, and the obscene cost of medical care in modern America.

More Fiction & Literature . More by lionel shriver. The post-birthday world. We need to talk about kevin.

Shep Knacker, the protagonist of Lionel Shriver’s latest novel, So Much for That, believes his life will begin in earnest only when he quits the rat race and moves .

Shep Knacker, the protagonist of Lionel Shriver’s latest novel, So Much for That, believes his life will begin in earnest only when he quits the rat race and moves to Pemba, an island off the coast of Tanzania whose principal attraction is the low cost of living. Or, as Shep thinks of it, The third world was running a sale: two lives for the price of one. Never mind that he built his own company and then sold it for a million dollars. Shep persists in feeling like an indentured servant. What it lacks is a fullness of wisdom about its characters’ potential for growth.

Stanober
So much for expecting to to read an engaging and enlightening novel about the sad state of health care in America. Instead I got an irritating polemic presented as a novel. Page after page of spewed vitriol mouthed through Jackson, one of the most unrealistic characters ever. I found most of the characters one dimensional and just plain unbelievable. The protagonist is presented as saintly and long suffering cast against myriads of flat negative unlikeable characters. A horrible wife who is sarcastic and insulting but terminal so he can't tell her off, kids who are distant and sucking money out of him right and left, a sister who sees him as her meal ticket, a father ditto, a punk boss who is demeaning and insulting, friends who drop out of their lives like flies. The protagonist apologises and apologizes, scrapes and bows, pays up and pays up and hardly ever pushes back. I was really irritated at the author for explaining certain words to the reader straight out. I know what "knacker" means and you don't have to hit me over the head to "get" why the protagonist is named Knacker! As for the ending, well all I can say that the author has trouble knowing when and where to end the story. At the airport before the whole unbelievable trip would have been a good ending. But no, we are then presented with a cast of characters on a journey that strains credibility. Readers are often asked to suspend disbelief, but sometimes to do so is nearly impossible and I felt that way with this book and particularly the ending. That fairy tale ending was the last straw and I felt set up and insulted. So much for that.
Original
Several years ago I read "We need to talk about Kevin". It was riveting, but I never pursued other Shriver books. "So Much for That" is an absorbing, well researched, human drama about two families in metro NY -- each dealing with serious medical issues and the accompany toll that takes on finances, family dynamics and life outlook. The medical details are not for the squeamish, but the authenticity of the writing and the gut wrenching empathy you feel for the characters is amazing. Highly recommended.
lolike
Engrossing and thought provoking, the book starts out gently, but everything gradually snowballs to the climax. For much of the book, the characters are frustrated (each person in a different way), things get worse and worse. Every hope, every dream, everything seems to dwindle. The book is very interesting, hard to put down in fact—but was kind of depressing.

Shep Knacker is a well written character, a handyman who not only built up a thriving handyman business, but is also the man who takes care of everyone and everything in his private life. His wife, his children, his wife's family, his sister, his father, neighbors—everyone comes to Shep and every time he steps up to the plate and fixes it or pays for it or whatever is needed. He spent his adult life planning to get out of the rat race and sold his house and his business and saved over a million dollars for him and his wife to get away from it all and live in some other country where they can live like kings on a small amount of American dollars.

When he finally stops waiting and buys the plane tickets, his wife reveals that she has cancer. Shep once again puts his plans on hold, and starts taking care of everybody and paying for everything—again.

With each chapter, his nest egg dwindles, as does the health of his wife.

However, at almost the last moment, our hero Shep pulls everything out of the toilet, lol.

While the buildup through most of the book is frustrating (even aggravating), wow, does it ever have a strong finish!! Very satisfying ending, and I was left feeling very happy and fulfilled. So glad I read this book!

Oddly, this was very different from the first book I read by Lionel Shriver, We Need to Talk About Kevin, which is still one of the most disturbing and creepy books I have ever read. Much more satisfying ending with So Much For That.
Larosa
My husband has lived with terminal cancer for over 5 years. Their story resonates with me in a way few could. The characters said things I have thought but have rarely been so brave as to say aloud. It's not for kids or the feint of heart. I don't share the same value system as the families involved, but I felt great compassion for them. Cancer does not discriminate. If you want to know how devastating this disease is (particularly when it is terminal) this gives a being the scenes view of it.
Quemal
I opened this book with trepidation, having finished "We Need to Talk About Kevin" in January (but that is a topic for a different review). This was a witty, satirical skewing of the ludicrousness of the American health care system that, in addition to carrying a message, ended up being funny and fast-paced. The poor hero has decided to ditch it all and move to an island when his wife drops a health-care bomb on him. His new bottomline is that he's got to keep his job to keep his health insurance. I think this is a situation that most of us here in America can relate to with regard to keeping a job one does not want because of its benefits, however meager.

Somehow, Shriver manages to convey the depth of sadness tempered by humor in a way that totally, totally works. We take a journey along with a whacky cast of characters that includes a best friend with a botched male member enlargement, and a full cast of other characters unique in their zaniness. As I find typically with this author, none of the characters if very likeable, but then I don't think that is the author's priority. She makes us think and exercise that brain and at the end of the day, we're better for having gone through the motions. This was a quick, entertaining read that managed to be thought-provoking as well.
Tygrafym
Horrible things happening to good but flawed people. Asbestos-caused mesothelioma, hereditary dysautonomia, gambling addiction, selfish relatives, depression. The author must be a sadist. Kind of like Job's God. And then a redemptive ending that will keep you smiling for days, which makes all of the suffering bearable. Lionel Shriver also writes very well, so you don't have to cringe over the prose, just over the plot.
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