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eBook Hush: An Irish Princess' Tale ePub

by Donna Jo Napoli

eBook Hush: An Irish Princess' Tale ePub
Author: Donna Jo Napoli
Language: English
ISBN: 0689861761
ISBN13: 978-0689861765
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (October 23, 2007)
Pages: 320
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Young Teens
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 347
Formats: txt doc doc azw
ePub file: 1839 kb
Fb2 file: 1665 kb

Donna Jo Napoli is the acclaimed and award-winning author of many novels, both fantasies and contemporary stories. She won the Golden Kite Award for Stones in Water in 1997.

Donna Jo Napoli is the acclaimed and award-winning author of many novels, both fantasies and contemporary stories. Her novel Zel was named an American Bookseller Pick of the Lists, a Publishers Weekly Best Book, a Bulletin Blue Ribbon, and a School Library Journal Best Book, and a number of her novels have been selected as ALA Best Books. She is a professor of linguistics at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, where she lives with her husband.

Napoli, Donna Jo. I must have fallen asleep, they were gone so long. How stupid of me. Now I struggle to my feet, working the rope up the mast as I stand. Sheep are tumbling into the fodder. From down in the basin of the boat its hard to see much, but through the fuzzy dawn I make out men climbing into the ship with sheep draped across their shoulders. They plop them into this area, sometimes on top of one another. From their pungent odor I can tell these creatures just had their second shearing of the season

Donna Jo Napoli is the acclaimed and award-winning author of many novels, both fantasies and contemporary stories.

An irish princess’ tale. Atheneum books for young readers. New york london toronto sydney. ALSO BY DONNA JO NAPOLI: Beast Breath Bound. An imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division. 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York 10020. This book is a work of fiction. Any references to historical events, real people, or real locales are used fictitiously.

Hush: An Irish Princess' Tale is a 2007 young adult novel written by Donna Jo Napoli. It appears in numerous school and public library reading lists. The book depicts the world of the slave trade around the year 900 in Ireland

Hush: An Irish Princess' Tale is a 2007 young adult novel written by Donna Jo Napoli. The book depicts the world of the slave trade around the year 900 in Ireland. Set in c. 900 in Ireland, where kings are constantly fighting over land, fifteen-year-old Melkorka is the eldest daughter of an Irish king. As a princess, Melkorka has lived a life of luxury made possible through slave labor.

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Hush: An Irish Princess' Tale. Melkorka is a princess, the first daughter of a magnificent kingdom in mediæval Ireland - but all of this is lost the day she is kidnapped and taken aboard a marauding slave ship. Based on an ancient Icelandic saga, award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli has crafted a heartbreaking story of a young girl who must learn to forget all that she knows and carve out a place for herself in a new world - all without speaking a word. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Napoli's tale of an Irish Princess spirited away on a slave ship to Russia and back . HUSH is based on an Icelandic folk tale. Donna Jo Napoli has gone to great lengths to create a story for the princess/slave described in the tale

HUSH is based on an Icelandic folk tale. Donna Jo Napoli has gone to great lengths to create a story for the princess/slave described in the tale. Her writing draws you into the story; you can almost feel the cold air from the deck of the Viking ship.

Fifteen-year-old Melkorka is a beautiful princess. He knows that Bjarni has stolen the gems from Irish monasteries during one of his raids

Fifteen-year-old Melkorka is a beautiful princess. She lives in medieval Ireland and is the first daughter of King Myrkjartan. Her maidservants wash and dress her, and she is accustomed to having slaves do her bidding. He knows that Bjarni has stolen the gems from Irish monasteries during one of his raids. The Norseman also sends an offer to marry Princess Melkorka, promising the princess a life of luxury and ensuring the King’s family wealth and happiness. HUSH is a spellbinding story that combines folktale and imagination, told in the magical voice of Princess Melkorka, who discovers a way to hold power over her kidnappers.

Melkorka is a princess, the first daughter of a magnificent kingdom in mediæval Ireland -- but all of this is lost the day she is kidnapped and taken aboard a marauding slave ship. Thrown into a world that she has never known, alongside people that her former country's laws regarded as less than human, Melkorka is forced to learn quickly how to survive. Taking a vow of silence, however, she finds herself an object of fascination to her captors and masters, and soon realizes that any power, no matter how little, can make a difference. Based on an ancient Icelandic saga, award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli has crafted a heartbreaking story of a young girl who must learn to forget all that she knows and carve out a place for herself in a new world -- all without speaking a word.
Pryl
So, I really did not like this book. Sorry, I just didn't.

*Spoilers*

It's pace was rather slow, which I honestly don't mind, except that in this case, the book is 300 pages where nothing happens. The book doesn't even finish Melkorka's story. It ends with her reaching Iceland and finding out she's pregnant. She never meets her owner's wife and no one discovers she can speak.

And honestly, Mel drove me nuts the majority of the books. At the start, it was because she was so haughty. "How dare he compare the life of a servant to that of a prince?" "How dare he try and make my little sister see the evils of slavery?" "Slaves have no brains in their heads."

But then, while being praised as a strong female character, Mel really didn't do anything. Yes, she refused to speak to her first captor. But that was after she listened to her 8 year old sister which is the reason they were captured in the first place and missed her chance of escape, abandoning her sister to the freezing waters as a result. Yes, she keeps up a ruse to convince Clay Man that she's a magical creature, and helps her fellow slaves, but she doesn't escape and ultimately doesn't save anyone's life. And for a woman who at the beginning of the book was bent on becoming a warrior, it was a let down.

When she is sold to Hoskuld, she does absolutely nothing impressive or strong. Rather, she appears to be a victim of Stockholm's syndrome. This man rapes her - takes the very thing she herself says is most precious - night after night. Only for us to see her enjoying it - Hoskuld drunk, barely able to stand up - after a month or so. The book ends with readers to believe she's fallen in love with Hoskuld; her owner, rapist, slave-trader and a married man. She is even happy - not that she's pregnant - but that she's pregnant with <i>his</i> child. Perhaps Napoli was trying to paint a picture of Stockholm's syndrome, but it wasn't done very well. It was incredibly disturbing.

The fact that this story was never finished irks me. The author's note tells the end to the real story of Melkorka, but this story spends 300 pages on the boring middle and never ends. There is a companion book which tells the story of what happens to her sister after she jumps off the ship, but I was disappointed in this book that I won't be reading the next one. Will that one even finish the story?

There's a lot of rape in this book; not explicit, but enough for your imagination to paint the picture. And lots of slavery. But little action aside from the slave traders smacking their "cargo" about or capturing new slaves. And the few times where there would have been action - such as the beginning with Mel's brother - Mel is absent and only finds out about it at the end.

This book is not spell-binding, it's not a thriller, it's not even that well written. It's nothing that the reviews said it would be.
Brakora
This book starts out with a lot of promise: the premise is interesting, the travel element sets us up for a rich and varied setting, and the concept of endurance in the face of suffering is wonderful. The grammar is sound, some of the descriptive writing is nicely picturesque, and there are two points in the story that actually evoked some emotional response from me. However, the vast majority of this story fell flat in many ways. The first seven chapters or so are, in a word, dull. Lots of things happen, but we only find out about them after the fact or from some great emotionless distance. The main character/narrator starts out equally dull and even irritating, although I grant that at least that gives her room to grow and change. But the story itself wanders and slumps, with only tiny moments of interest and no real emotion. We read pages and pages about sitting around on a boat, walking, sitting around, getting stared at, sitting around, some other people are here and here are their names, the other people do some stuff but the main character doesn't seem to really care, some more sitting...it may be realistic, but it is incredibly difficult to read. Characters show up for about two pages, get a name almost in retrospect ("I smiled at That New Guy Just Introduced, because I had always liked him even though I've never mentioned him before now at all"). We go through pages of meeting and losing people in the space of a few paragraphs without getting to know or care about any of them, and at the end of the story, absolutely nothing has been resolved for anyone. Worst of all is the ending, where the main character reacts to a sudden revelation in a way that does not jive with her mannerisms and attitude throughout the rest of the book. It's like the author reached the end of her ideas, realized that nothing had been resolved, and said, "Well, okay, how about this: she's suddenly almost sort of not completely miserable for no apparent reason. So it's like a happy ending or something." Also, since this book is billed for YA readers, I should probably mention that the two spots where I had any real emotional response were at pretty horrible, heavy atrocities that might be tough for younger readers (or anyone with abuse triggers) to swallow.

The author has potential, but this story was disappointing.
Usanner
This was a lovely story. It is based on an Icelandic folk tale. It is about an Irish princess named Melkorka that ends up being abducted in the process of her family trying to keep her safe. Now Donna Jo Napoli does a wonderful job at retelling fairytale stories. I love the twist she puts on the classic tales. If you are looking for a happy ending be warned this may not be a book for you.
Melkorka was a princess that turned into a slave. In the story you really get a good look at different types of culture. Melkorka choose to become a mute under her new settings and you got to see her views grow and developed throughout the story.
‘HUSH’ was a heartbreaking tale that made me hurt alongside Melkorka. The only reason that I cannot give ‘HUSH’ five stars is because I felt that the beginning was drawn out. I felt that some of the pages used for the beginning could have been used to answer the loose ends at the end of the story. Now people have said this story doesn’t end like most fairy tales but I think for that reason I was drawn into it. This was a great fairytale/historical-fiction read and I recommend it for anyone.
Now I’m off to research a little more into the historical events that were presented.
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